main navigation
my pace

Pace University Students | PACE UNIVERSITY

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Daily Voice" featured two Pace University students Shea Vaughan-Gabor and Jason Marrs in "Pace University Students Go From Class To Screen In Los Angeles"

03/06/2019

"Daily Voice" featured two Pace University students Shea Vaughan-Gabor and Jason Marrs in "Pace University Students Go From Class To Screen In Los Angeles"

Two students from Pace University are making their network television debuts after landing coveted roles on the CBS series “NCIS.”

The students, Shea Vaughan-Gabor and Jason Marrs, received the roles during their time in the school’s LA Acting Intensive Program, a program for seniors that involves a three-week trip to Los Angeles for immersion into the world of Hollywood acting.

"I was incredibly impressed with the Pace Performing Arts BFA Acting students and their talent, work ethic, diverse backgrounds, and creative brilliance,” said “NCIS” Casting Director Jason Kennedy. “These young actors were so well-trained that their performance and audition technique rivaled many professional actors who come into the room.

"Excellent training as an actor is one thing, but being prepared and professional throughout the audition process is something that set these actors apart from recent graduates at other schools."

The student-actors say they’ve had a “wild” experience in Los Angeles, though they were initially a bit nervous while on the set. Both say that the school’s LA Acting Intensive Program helped to prepare them for the professional acting atmosphere, which is its exact goal.

“The LA Intensive was designed to give the students an immersive industry experience,” said Wendy Kurtzman, co-producer of the LA Intensive program and adjunct full professor, BFA Acting for Film, Television, Voice-overs and Commercials at Pace. “It exposes students to the professionals who will be hiring them.”

For more information about Performing Arts programs at Pace University, click here .

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Atlanta Journal Constitution" featured Pace University students Wesley Goodrich and Sam Casey in "Theater festival in Norcross launches with reading about Emmett Till"

01/16/2019

"Atlanta Journal Constitution" featured Pace University students Wesley Goodrich and Sam Casey in "Theater festival in Norcross launches with reading about Emmett Till"

Wesley Goodrich learned the story of Emmett Till as a child. Goodrich’s mother, a history teacher, made sure her son knew about the 14-year-old African-American boy from Chicago who was murdered by white men in 1955 while visiting relatives in Money, Miss.

By the time Goodrich left his Brooklyn neighborhood to study directing at Pace University in New York City, he firmly believed that history can help you make sense of the present. So in the summer of 2016 when Philando Castile and Alton Sterling, two black men, became victims of police shootings, Goodrich knew the past and the present were colliding.

“I remember feeling powerless and feeling like if it was happening to other people who looked like me, it would eventually happen to me,” said Goodrich.

It seemed to him a sentiment that many young black men must have felt in 1955 when Emmett Till was killed, accused of flirting with a white woman. “It was the first time the whole country had to confront racism in a tangible way after the Civil War,” Goodrich said. “They had to reckon with it when a 14-year-old boy is laying in a coffin in front of them.”

That summer, Goodrich was inspired to write “A Good Place to Raise a Boy,” a play that details the events leading up to Emmett Till’s death as well as the family’s grief and subsequent response. On Thursday, Goodrich brings a reading of the play to Atlanta as part of the first New Works Festival at Lionheart Theatre in Norcross.

The two-day festival, founded by Goodrich’s classmate and Norcross native Sam Casey, promises to bring a new type of theater experience to metro Atlanta. “The ultimate goal is to have festival viewers enjoy what used to be called experimental theater,” said Casey, who is also a senior at Pace University. Casey hopes to make the festival an annual event that brings young artists from New York City and eventually other cities around the country to work with artists in metro Atlanta and produce innovative theater.

The second day of the festival (Friday) will feature two short plays also by students at Pace University. “Sun (day)” is the story of the first U.S. colony on Venus, where the sun shines only once every seven years. The “Boo Hog” features a mysterious woman in the mountains of Appalachia who is either evil or misunderstood.

Award-winning director Joanie McElroy will lead Atlanta-area actors in a reading of “A Good Place to Raise a Boy.” McElroy noted how the play highlights Mamie Till’s foresight in using her son’s death as a moment to teach the world. “In the play, Ruby Hurley says to Emmett’s mother, ‘Your son woke the country up,’” McElroy said. More than a half-century later, Emmett Till’s death continues to inform generations of Americans.

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Pleasantville Patch" featured two Pace University students Sydney Korman and Terrie Soule in "Pace Students Address UN General Assembly"

11/01/2018

"Pleasantville Patch" featured two Pace University students Sydney Korman and Terrie Soule in "Pace Students Address UN General Assembly"

The two Pace University students called for greater participation of youth, women, survivors of violence and people from the 'Global South.'

Two Pace University students delivered a statement to the United Nations General Assembly last week calling for greater participation of youth, women, survivors of violence and people from the 'Global South,' which is comprised of Africa, Latin America, and Asia including the Middle East, in peace and security policymaking.

Pace students Sydney Korman and Terrie Soule delivered the address in which they said, "Disarmament education can and should emphasize the humanitarian, human rights and environmental consequences of arms, militarism and armed conflict. It should seek to empower the next generation of leaders to seek peace and alternative conflict resolution processes rather than relying on violence and war."

Korman is a Women and Gender Studies and Political Science double major and Soule is a Peace and Justice Studies and Women and Gender Studies major at the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace. When asked about the experience, Soule said, "Disarmament education and involving youth in peace making are essential processes for creating a more sustainable and peaceful future."

"We are very proud of our students calling for the world's leaders to listen to the voices of young people," said Emily Welty, director of the Peace and Justice Studies program. "They challenge us all to work for a more just, peaceful and sustainable world."

Both students delivered their statement on behalf of nine academic and advocacy organizations including Article 36, Federal University of Pampa, Mine's Action Canada, Pace University's Disarmament Institute, the Peace Education Art, Communication Institute, Peace Boat, Soka Gakkai International, Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, and the World Council of Churches.

The students' professors, Welty and Matthew Bolton, worked with students with the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) and were part of the team recognized with the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize award. Professor Bolton runs the International Disarmament Institute at Pace University. Pace was recognized in a report by UN Secretary-General António Guterres earlier this year as playing "a globally recognized leading role in disarmament education."

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"News12" featured Florence, a 19-year-old Pace University student, in "Outrage erupts over Trump plan to reverse transgender identity"

10/23/2018

"News12" featured Florence, a 19-year-old Pace University student, in "Outrage erupts over Trump plan to reverse transgender identity"

PLEASANTVILLE - LGBTQ supporters around the nation and in the Hudson Valley are expressing outrage over the latest Trump administration plan to define gender as biologically determined at birth.

According to a memo obtained by the New York Times, the Department of Health and Human Services is proposing Americans identify as the gender listed on their birth certificates.

If implemented, the new White House definition would reverse Obama-era policies that allowed at least 1.4 million transgender people to choose how they identify.

Florence L., a 19-year-old Pace University student, says she has spent her entire life understanding her identity. She say she's a proud transgender woman, but she's concerned her rights to health care will be erased under the Trump Administration. “I'm proud of being trans because I don't think there's another option. It took a lot of people a very long time to get us to where we are now.”

LGBTQ supporters, including celebrities and politicians, have also expressed concerns on social media. The trending topic around Transgender Rights includes this tweet from Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand which states, "I want all transgender Americans to know that we will not let anyone erase you."

Florence hopes the Trump Administration’s plans to revoke LGBTQ rights will ultimately be rejected. “Because it's trying to change how people think about something that impacts so much of how the world works and how we look at the world.”

Watch News12.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Fox5" featured Pace University students talking to Emmy-Award winning journalist Linda Schmidt about what the Kavanagh hearings meant to them in "Talking about sexual assault"

10/01/2018

"Fox5" featured Pace University students talking to Emmy-Award winning journalist Linda Schmidt about what the Kavanagh hearings meant to them in "Talking about sexual assault"

Many Pace University students have been closely watching the proceedings. The students said we are, once again, having the wrong conversation about drinking and possible sexual assault. They don't think drinking is the problem.

Watch Fox5 news clip.