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Pauline Mosley | PACE UNIVERSITY

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"The New Yorker" featured Pace University’s Camp CryptoBot in "A Summer Camp for the Next Generation of N.S.A. Agents"

08/16/2019

"The New Yorker" featured Pace University’s Camp CryptoBot in "A Summer Camp for the Next Generation of N.S.A. Agents"

...On the last Monday in July, as news broke that a hundred million Capital One bank accounts had been breached, I attended Camp CryptoBot, at Pace University’s Westchester campus, the only cyber camp affiliated with the Navy. A few years ago, the camp director, Pauline Mosley, a professor of information technology, found herself sitting next to an admiral at a conference and used the opportunity to deploy her pre-digital networking skills.

Camp CryptoBot, like all N.S.A. cyber camps, is funded jointly by the N.S.A. and the National Science Foundation, and is free to participants. It attracts students from Westchester’s wealthy communities and from districts that are hurting, homeschooled students and others from parochial schools. There are also students with special needs. Mosley, who is African-American, is particularly focussed on bringing girls, especially girls of color, to the camp. She sits on the boards of G.O.O.D. for Girls, and has done outreach with Girls Inc. and Latino U College Access. “I align myself with organizations that appeal to young women,” she told me. “We have to educate women that cybersecurity is not a man’s domain.” Almost all the camp instructors were women; many of them were women of color.

“What’s the password?” John Sarlo, a retired science teacher, asked at the door to the Stephen J. Friedman multipurpose room, in Wilcox Hall. (The answer was the name of the campers’ high school; thirty-one schools, most from the tri-state region, were represented.) In a goofy nod to the camp’s benefactor, students were offered black fedoras, dark glasses, and cardboard briefcases stamped with the words “Top Secret.” Inside was a blank index card, two poker chips, two pens, a card game called Cyber Realm, a number of popular—if inscrutable—ciphers to decode encrypted messages, and a laminated card that had encoded the phrase “the quick brown fox” to read “uif rvjdi cspxo gpy.” Campers would soon have the opportunity to use one of the ciphers to figure out which of four groups they’d been assigned to—Hawks, Eagles, Ravens, Falcons—and another one to decode the tasks required to solve a hacking mystery.

Just after nine, two Navy officers, in dress whites, interrupted an awkward game of Simon Says (Simon was a former vice-president of security and risk management for MasterCard) and announced that the school had been hacked. “Your assignment,” they said, “is to find who did this.” To unmask the hacker, the students would have to build two remotely operated underwater vehicles; they would use one, outfitted with a camera, to view coded messages submerged in the college pool, and use the other to retrieve those messages in sequential order, decrypt them, and launch a drone to find more encrypted messages, and then identify the hackers and take down their network. The naval officers were on hand, in part, to help the teams construct the underwater vehicles, called SeaPerches, which were developed by the Office of Naval Research and M.I.T. to encourage young Americans to become engineers. In the world of professional cybersecurity, it typically takes about a hundred and ninety-six days to identify a breach, and then another sixty-nine to contain it; the campers had four days. In undertaking the task, Petty Officer James Fields, a twelve-year naval-operations specialist, said, “You will learn how to protect yourself and your country.”

A hundred and fifty-three students applied for the Pace camp. There would have been more applicants, but, with only fifty open slots, Mosley did not want to have to send out more rejection letters than necessary, so she shut down the application process. “The criterion is first come, first served,” she said. “It’s not about G.P.A. or honors classes. Not every school has those. It’s really about: How interested are you? We’ve got to spend our money wisely.” The maximum N.S.A. GenCyber grant is a hundred thousand dollars. The Pace camp gets significantly less than that—about sixty-seven thousand dollars.

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"The Examiner" featured Seidenberg's Camp CryptoBot in "Pace's Cybersecurity Camp Inspires Next Generation"

08/14/2019

"The Examiner" featured Seidenberg's Camp CryptoBot in "Pace's Cybersecurity Camp Inspires Next Generation"

Utilizing underwater robots, aerial drones and cutting-edge coding techniques, 50 high school students from throughout the region have gained hands-on cybersecurity experience as part of Pace University’s Camp CryptoBot.

Inspired by a mission to motivate younger students to pursue cybersecurity – especially women and those from underserved areas – the camp is supported by the National Security Agency (NSA) and the National Science Foundation as part of the national GenCyber program. Earlier in July, Pace University also hosted a two-week cybersecurity workshop for teachers to help facilitate the integration of cybersecurity concepts into lessons and after-school activities.

“Pace University’s commitment to cybersecurity education benefits the whole nation. Everything we do today has a cybersecurity component to it,” said NSA National Cryptologic School Commandant Diane M. Janosek. “GenCyber gives students the opportunity to learn about the role cybersecurity plays in their daily lives and encourages them to consider working in this field.”

“By 2020, it’s estimated that up to 2 million unfilled cybersecurity positions will exist in the United States. From national security to personal privacy, this shortage poses a critical threat to our society – but also an opportunity for students,” said Professor Pauline Mosley, who spearheaded the camp on behalf of Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. “Pace University is committed to closing that gap by inspiring younger students to pursue cybersecurity and by equipping teachers with the resources they need to incorporate these lessons.” 

In addition to hands-on labs, Camp CryptoBot also taught students to understand safe online behavior and how ethics applies to cybersecurity. The five-day camp was free for all accepted students, including free breakfast and lunch.

Fourteen-year-old Nickole Leite, who attends Yonkers Middle/High School, said that although things like cipher codes are complicated at first, once you get to know them each becomes simplified and very secretive – something she’s been drawn to since she was a young child.

“When I was little I used to read a lot of mystery books, so learning about different kinds of codes before decrypting and encrypting them is like something out of a movie,” Leite said. “To know it’s real life and I know how to do this is amazing!”

Sponsored by the National Security Agency and the National Science Foundation, GenCyber offers summer cybersecurity camps free-of-cost to students and teachers in grades K-12.  Since 2014, more than 12,000 students and 3,000 teachers have attended GenCyber camps. In 2019, 122 GenCyber camps will be held at 76 institutions across 38 states, D.C. and Puerto Rico, reaching more than 3,000 students and 800 teachers.

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"Yonkers Rising" featured Pace University's Camp CryptoBot in "Pace's Cybersecurity Camp Inspires Next Generation"

08/14/2019

"Yonkers Rising" featured Pace University's Camp CryptoBot in "Pace's Cybersecurity Camp Inspires Next Generation"

Utilizing underwater robots, aerial drones and cutting-edge coding techniques, 50 high school students from throughout the region have gained hands-on cybersecurity experience as part of Pace University’s Camp CryptoBot.

Inspired by a mission to motivate younger students to pursue cybersecurity – especially women and those from underserved areas – the camp is supported by the National Security Agency (NSA) and the National Science Foundation as part of the national GenCyber program. Earlier in July, Pace University also hosted a two-week cybersecurity workshop for teachers to help facilitate the integration of cybersecurity concepts into lessons and after-school activities.

“Pace University’s commitment to cybersecurity education benefits the whole nation. Everything we do today has a cybersecurity component to it,” said NSA National Cryptologic School Commandant Diane M. Janosek. “GenCyber gives students the opportunity to learn about the role cybersecurity plays in their daily lives and encourages them to consider working in this field.”

“By 2020, it’s estimated that up to 2 million unfilled cybersecurity positions will exist in the United States. From national security to personal privacy, this shortage poses a critical threat to our society – but also an opportunity for students,” said Professor Pauline Mosley, who spearheaded the camp on behalf of Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. “Pace University is committed to closing that gap by inspiring younger students to pursue cybersecurity and by equipping teachers with the resources they need to incorporate these lessons.” 

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"American Digest News" featured Seidenberg’s Camp Cryptobot in "Pace University’s Cybersecurity Camp Inspires Next Generation in the Face of a Massive Professional Shortage"

08/07/2019

"American Digest News" featured Seidenberg’s Camp Cryptobot in "Pace University’s Cybersecurity Camp Inspires Next Generation in the Face of a Massive Professional Shortage"

High school students learn to code using underwater robots and aerial drones during weeklong camp program sponsored by the National Security Agency and the National Science Foundation

Utilizing underwater robots, aerial drones and cutting-edge coding techniques, 50 high school from throughout the region have gained hands-on cybersecurity experience as part of Pace University’s Camp CryptoBot.

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"Patch" featured Seidenberg’s Camp Cryptobot in "Pace University’s Cybersecurity Camp Inspires Next Generation in the Face of a Massive Professional Shortage"

08/05/2019

"Patch" featured Seidenberg’s Camp Cryptobot in "Pace University’s Cybersecurity Camp Inspires Next Generation in the Face of a Massive Professional Shortage"

Utilizing underwater robots, aerial drones and cutting-edge coding techniques, 50 high school students from throughout the region have gained hands-on cybersecurity experience as part of Pace University’s Camp CryptoBot.

Inspired by a mission to motivate younger students to pursue cybersecurity – especially women and those from underserved areas – the camp is supported by the National Security Agency (NSA) and the National Science Foundation as part of the national GenCyber program. Earlier in July, Pace University also hosted a two-week cybersecurity workshop for teachers to help facilitate the integration of cybersecurity concepts into lessons and after-school activities.

“Pace University’s commitment to cybersecurity education benefits the whole nation. Everything we do today has a cybersecurity component to it,” said NSA National Cryptologic School Commandant Diane M. Janosek. “GenCyber gives students the opportunity to learn about the role cybersecurity plays in their daily lives and encourages them to consider working in this field.”

“By 2020, it’s estimated that up to 2 million unfilled cybersecurity positions will exist in the United States. From national security to personal privacy, this shortage poses a critical threat to our society – but also an opportunity for students,” said Professor Pauline Mosley, who spearheaded the camp on behalf of Pace University’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. “Pace University is committed to closing that gap by inspiring younger students to pursue cybersecurity and by equipping teachers with the resources they need to incorporate these lessons.” 

In addition to hands-on labs, Camp CryptoBot also taught students to understand safe online behavior and how ethics applies to cybersecurity. The five-day camp was free for all accepted students, including free breakfast and lunch.

Fourteen-year-old Nickole Leite, who attends Yonkers Middle/High School, said that although things like cipher codes are complicated at first, once you get to know them each becomes simplified and very secretive –something she’s been drawn to since she was a young child. 

“When I was little I used to read a lot of mystery books, so learning about different kinds of codes before decrypting and encrypting them is like something out of a movie,” Leite said. “To know it’s real life and I know how to do this is amazing!”

Sponsored by the National Security Agency and the National Science Foundation, GenCyber offers summer cybersecurity camps free-of cost to students and teachers in grades K-12.  Since 2014, more than 12,000 students and 3,000 teachers have attended GenCyber camps. In 2019, 122 GenCyber camps will be held at 76 institutions across 38 states, D.C. and Puerto Rico, reaching more than 3,000 students and 800 teachers. 

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"Lo Hud" featured Pace University’s Camp CryptoBot in "High School students create and code underwater robots at Pace University’s Camp CryptoBot"

08/05/2019

"Lo Hud" featured Pace University’s Camp CryptoBot in "High School students create and code underwater robots at Pace University’s Camp CryptoBot"

Teams of students compete with underwater robots at Pace University's Camp CryptoBot in Pleasantville on Thursday, August 1, 2019.

A team makes last minute changes to their underwater robot at Pace University's Camp CryptoBot in Pleasantville on Thursday, August 1, 2019.

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"News 12 Westchester" featured Seidenberg’s Professor Pauline Mosley and her Camp Cryptobot in "Cyber camp teaches high schoolers how to keep their technology safe and secure"

08/05/2019

"News 12 Westchester" featured Seidenberg’s Professor Pauline Mosley and her Camp Cryptobot in "Cyber camp teaches high schoolers how to keep their technology safe and secure"

Pace University held a cyber camp to teach high schoolers how to keep their technology safe and secure. Camp Cryptobot aimed to teach the importance of cybersecurity, as well as show off cool technology.

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