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Phyllis Mooney | PACE UNIVERSITY

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College Recruiter featured Executive Director of Career Services Phyllis Mooney in "How do you recruit more diverse students and recent grads? Start by recruiting from more colleges."

09/30/2020

College Recruiter featured Executive Director of Career Services Phyllis Mooney in "How do you recruit more diverse students and recent grads? Start by recruiting from more colleges."

Phyllis Mooney, Executive Director of Career Services at Pace University, believes that if companies are serious about recruiting diverse talent, they can start by recruiting from a wider range of universities. According to Mooney, four strategies can help employers of college and university students and recent graduates hire and then retain a more diverse talent pool:

*Early engagement, very early engagement – Start building your brand with diverse student talent before they even get to college campuses.  Speak to the students about the opportunities in your organization, and what it takes to get in the most coveted and competitive spots.  Educate, inspire, and plant the seeds…even if COVID makes that more difficult!  For example, Pace hosted a virtual event in mid-July with EY targeting incoming first-year students and rising second-year students. The theme was why students should choose a career in accounting. The purpose of the event was to attract more talent to accounting while students were still undecided. In short, EY invested in its community by expanding the number of students choosing accounting, even though only some of those accounting students would choose EY.

*Sell your company – Top employers come to campus with the attitude that all students want to work for them and therefore the students need to sell themselves in a way that makes them stand out from all the others.  If great, diverse talent is what you are after, try flipping your thinking. Pitch your brand and programs to students. Tell them why they should choose your company over others. Follow up with the students in a way you traditionally expect them to follow up with you.

*Send more employees to campus – Along with your HR representatives, send more people from your ERGs to campus to meet students.  In addition to the technical questions, students will have many questions about the company culture, and want to figure out if they fit in.  Speaking to someone who will be able to relate to them, makes a huge difference.  

*Mentorship is critical for retention purposes – Invest in building a mentorship program. Choose your company mentors carefully, and train them to be successful at it.           

Read the full College Recruiter article.

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"Business Because featured Pace's Lubin School of Business in "4 Ways A Flexible MBA Helps You Master The Hybrid Workplace"

09/02/2020

"Business Because featured Pace's Lubin School of Business in "4 Ways A Flexible MBA Helps You Master The Hybrid Workplace"

1. You will gain virtual networking experience

Networking is crucial to any career. In fact, one LinkedIn survey found that around 85% of jobs are filled through networking, rather than formal applications. 

To succeed in today’s hybrid workplace, though, being able to build these connections virtually, as well as face-to-face, is a vital skill. 

By pursuing an MBA with an online component, students can practice doing just that—interacting with peers, alumni, and potential employers through virtual classes and events.  

For Jonathan Perez, a current MBA student in the new flexible MBA program at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York, the chance to build a strong network has been a highlight.

“The connection to employers that I might not have got my foot in the door with otherwise was a big plus for me,” he explains.

With a background in the US Navy, Jonathan is using his MBA to pivot into human resources, completing the talent management specialization. 

During his final year of service with the Navy, he assumed a career counselling role, helping sailors who were retiring or under medical review transition into new careers. 

“That’s when I fell in love with different aspects of human resources,” he explains. 

When he graduates, Jonathan plans to work his way into an HR role with a government agency.

2. Career coaches will guide you through the changing world of work

Undertaking a flexible MBA also gives you access to a range of career services—on-campus or online—to support your transition to a hybrid workplace.

Helping MBA students at Lubin prepare is Phyllis Mooney, executive director of Career Services at Pace University. She and her team offer one-to-one coaching, online resources, and workshops.

“We recently put together a learning module on how to start off a job remotely,” Phyllis explains. During this module, students learned how to build rapport virtually, and get the most out of working from home.

“The key takeaway was to run the job as you would in an office,” she concludes. “Dress up, show up, participate in activities, and ensure you’re scheduling regular catch-ups with your manager.”

Read the full Business Because article.

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The Economist featured Executive Director of Career Services Phyllis Mooney in "How to manage up from home"

06/19/2020

The Economist featured Executive Director of Career Services Phyllis Mooney in "How to manage up from home"

Offer to help, too. Be generous and public with praise. Let everyone know when people around you do awesome things. This raises your peers’ profile and transitively raises your own. Ask your boss if you can “take something off their plate”. Doing so shows you can take on important work and can rise to a “level-up” challenge. “What important pre-crisis work is your manager not able to get to? Can you do the work, or learn it quickly? If yes, raise your hand,” suggests Phyllis Mooney, executive director of career services at Pace University.

Read the full Economist article.

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Patch featured President Marvin Krislov in "Pace University's Career Services Extends Help to Parents"

04/15/2020

Patch featured President Marvin Krislov in "Pace University's Career Services Extends Help to Parents"

Responding to the economic fallout from the global coronavirus pandemic that has wiped out jobs, decimated incomes and is threatening to push the economy into a recession, Pace University is now offering its career services resources to parents of students who have lost jobs, the University today announced.

In extending its full range of resources, relationships, recruitment and know-how to include parents adversely affected by economic fallout of this crisis, Pace's department of Career Services stands ready to help families in need find employment.

"Pace has a long tradition of creating opportunities for our students," said President Marvin Krislov. "In this uncertain time, we're very pleased to do the same for Pace families by extending Career Services placement expertise to parents of our students. We know that student success is directly tied to family stability, but, more important, it's the right thing to do at a time when people need us most."

In addition to providing career services to adults, Pace University is providing supplies for front-line health care workers, sending volunteers to much needed hospitals and medical centers in the region, and marshaling its resources to assist those who need help, Krislov noted.

This is the first time Pace Career Services is being offered beyond students and alumni population to include current parents. Historically, Pace has some of the strongest job placement outcomes among undergraduate and graduate students. It's one of the many reasons that Pace is ranked number one in upward economic mobility among four-year private universities according to a study conducted by Harvard University's Opportunity Insights.

Read the full Patch article.

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"U.S. News & World Report" featured Pace's executive director of career services Phyllis Mooney and international student Rounak Agarwal in "Learn About Internships for International Students"

05/15/2019

"U.S. News & World Report" featured Pace's executive director of career services Phyllis Mooney and international student Rounak Agarwal in "Learn About Internships for International Students"

As an international student from India, Rounak Agarwal started looking for internships during his sophomore year at Pace University in New York, where he is majoring in economics with a minor in business analytics. Agarwal, a rising senior, has had two internships so far in the financial services industry, as a finance intern at Playfair Planning Services and mortgage analyst at Emigrant Bank.

He says his internship at the bank, where he has worked as a paid intern since September 2018, has been a good opportunity since he wants to start his career in the financial services industry. "This internship provided me with great knowledge into the mortgage and lending areas," Agarwal says.

As prospective international students search for and apply to U.S. colleges, they may want to start thinking about internships. For students who have not yet enrolled, here are some things to know about how internships work in the U.S.

Eligibility. Experts say eligibility for internships is based on the visa status a student plans to get.

"F-1 students are eligible to intern off campus, which is called Curricular Practical Training, CPT, after two full academic semesters at the university, not including summer sessions," says Phyllis Mooney, executive director of career services at Pace University.

Mooney says if a student has completed a previous degree in the U.S. and has already been issued an F-1 visa for that degree, he or she does not have to wait two academic semesters to start an internship. She says students transferring in from another college do not have to wait either, unless they enter Pace with only one semester from a previous institution, in which case they would only wait for one semester versus one full academic year.

Mooney says for those who are on a J-1 exchange visitor visa, eligibility works slightly differently.

Read the full article.

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"The Examiner" featured Pace University's Career Services ribbon cutting in "Pace Unveils New Center to Help Students Realize Career Goals"

10/10/2018

"The Examiner" featured Pace University's Career Services ribbon cutting in "Pace Unveils New Center to Help Students Realize Career Goals"

Pace University held a special celebration last week showcasing a new building aimed at helping students acquire internships and advancing their careers after college.

Representatives from Pace University were joined by students, faculty and elected officials last Wednesday as they unveiled their new career center located on the Pleasantville campus. The new 3,500 –square-foot space in Paton House boasts the latest technology and relaxed, private interview rooms where advisors work with students on job placement.

Phyllis Mooney, executive director of career services at Pace, said she has wanted to open this facility for seven years. With a previous career services office that was difficult for students to access, she said advisers would have to travel the campus to meet with students in various buildings.

“Now we’re here in a centrally located space and that was really important,” Mooney said. “We’re accessible to every single student and we’re just so accessible that they’re with us through their entire journey at Pace and beyond.”

The renovated 18th century stone barn, directly across from student housing, features bright, open spaces, sound-proof glass, full-wall sliding doors and modern furnishing. The roughly 14 private rooms designed for career services contains computers, desks, and virtual technology to be used for interviews with potential employers. The building also has conference rooms and gender-neutral bathrooms.

“We really brainstormed on what this facility should look like and we wanted it to be different,” Mooney said. “We wanted a very open and transparent space with spaces in the middle where students, advisers and executive boards can collaborate. It was designed for the students with the assistance of students in mind.”

Read the full article.