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Phyllis Mooney | PACE UNIVERSITY

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New York Post featured Pace University’s recovery internship program in "College students are turning to nonprofits for valuable intern opportunities"

03/01/2021

New York Post featured Pace University’s recovery internship program in "College students are turning to nonprofits for valuable intern opportunities"

When her teaching assistant internship got scrapped overnight last summer, Pace University student Vicky Trieu, 22, of Secaucus, NJ, didn’t miss a beat.

The child education major landed a replacement opportunity through a new Pace initiative, New York Recovery Internships, which pairs students with local nonprofit organizations. Trieu joined up with the Urban League, a civil rights and urban advocacy organization, for 28 hours each week.

“This came at a time that I unexpectedly needed it the most,” said Trieu, who worked on education research. Although it was not a teaching role, she said it “ultimately enabled me to grow as a future educator.”

Last year, Pace placed 65 of its students with 24 nonprofits, paying interns $15 an hour raised by the school.

Phyllis Mooney, executive director of career services at Pace, said, “This program is a highlight of my career. It’s growing two trees with one seed. Such a fantastic opportunity for the students and for the nonprofits who were impacted by COVID-19.”

In addition to gaining skills and helping nonprofits that typically rely on in-person events for fund-raising, interns got a glimpse into nonprofit careers. “Students think nonprofit means no money,” said Mooney. “Look at these nonprofits! Don’t eliminate nonprofits from your thinking. There is a future, this is great work, and it pays.”

Read the full NY Post article.

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College Recruiter featured Executive Director of Career Services Phyllis Mooney in "How do you recruit more diverse students and recent grads? Start by recruiting from more colleges."

09/30/2020

College Recruiter featured Executive Director of Career Services Phyllis Mooney in "How do you recruit more diverse students and recent grads? Start by recruiting from more colleges."

Phyllis Mooney, Executive Director of Career Services at Pace University, believes that if companies are serious about recruiting diverse talent, they can start by recruiting from a wider range of universities. According to Mooney, four strategies can help employers of college and university students and recent graduates hire and then retain a more diverse talent pool:

*Early engagement, very early engagement – Start building your brand with diverse student talent before they even get to college campuses.  Speak to the students about the opportunities in your organization, and what it takes to get in the most coveted and competitive spots.  Educate, inspire, and plant the seeds…even if COVID makes that more difficult!  For example, Pace hosted a virtual event in mid-July with EY targeting incoming first-year students and rising second-year students. The theme was why students should choose a career in accounting. The purpose of the event was to attract more talent to accounting while students were still undecided. In short, EY invested in its community by expanding the number of students choosing accounting, even though only some of those accounting students would choose EY.

*Sell your company – Top employers come to campus with the attitude that all students want to work for them and therefore the students need to sell themselves in a way that makes them stand out from all the others.  If great, diverse talent is what you are after, try flipping your thinking. Pitch your brand and programs to students. Tell them why they should choose your company over others. Follow up with the students in a way you traditionally expect them to follow up with you.

*Send more employees to campus – Along with your HR representatives, send more people from your ERGs to campus to meet students.  In addition to the technical questions, students will have many questions about the company culture, and want to figure out if they fit in.  Speaking to someone who will be able to relate to them, makes a huge difference.  

*Mentorship is critical for retention purposes – Invest in building a mentorship program. Choose your company mentors carefully, and train them to be successful at it.           

Read the full College Recruiter article.

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"Business Because featured Pace's Lubin School of Business in "4 Ways A Flexible MBA Helps You Master The Hybrid Workplace"

09/02/2020

"Business Because featured Pace's Lubin School of Business in "4 Ways A Flexible MBA Helps You Master The Hybrid Workplace"

1. You will gain virtual networking experience

Networking is crucial to any career. In fact, one LinkedIn survey found that around 85% of jobs are filled through networking, rather than formal applications. 

To succeed in today’s hybrid workplace, though, being able to build these connections virtually, as well as face-to-face, is a vital skill. 

By pursuing an MBA with an online component, students can practice doing just that—interacting with peers, alumni, and potential employers through virtual classes and events.  

For Jonathan Perez, a current MBA student in the new flexible MBA program at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business in New York, the chance to build a strong network has been a highlight.

“The connection to employers that I might not have got my foot in the door with otherwise was a big plus for me,” he explains.

With a background in the US Navy, Jonathan is using his MBA to pivot into human resources, completing the talent management specialization. 

During his final year of service with the Navy, he assumed a career counselling role, helping sailors who were retiring or under medical review transition into new careers. 

“That’s when I fell in love with different aspects of human resources,” he explains. 

When he graduates, Jonathan plans to work his way into an HR role with a government agency.

2. Career coaches will guide you through the changing world of work

Undertaking a flexible MBA also gives you access to a range of career services—on-campus or online—to support your transition to a hybrid workplace.

Helping MBA students at Lubin prepare is Phyllis Mooney, executive director of Career Services at Pace University. She and her team offer one-to-one coaching, online resources, and workshops.

“We recently put together a learning module on how to start off a job remotely,” Phyllis explains. During this module, students learned how to build rapport virtually, and get the most out of working from home.

“The key takeaway was to run the job as you would in an office,” she concludes. “Dress up, show up, participate in activities, and ensure you’re scheduling regular catch-ups with your manager.”

Read the full Business Because article.

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The Economist featured Executive Director of Career Services Phyllis Mooney in "How to manage up from home"

06/19/2020

The Economist featured Executive Director of Career Services Phyllis Mooney in "How to manage up from home"

Offer to help, too. Be generous and public with praise. Let everyone know when people around you do awesome things. This raises your peers’ profile and transitively raises your own. Ask your boss if you can “take something off their plate”. Doing so shows you can take on important work and can rise to a “level-up” challenge. “What important pre-crisis work is your manager not able to get to? Can you do the work, or learn it quickly? If yes, raise your hand,” suggests Phyllis Mooney, executive director of career services at Pace University.

Read the full Economist article.

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Patch featured President Marvin Krislov in "Pace University's Career Services Extends Help to Parents"

04/15/2020

Patch featured President Marvin Krislov in "Pace University's Career Services Extends Help to Parents"

Responding to the economic fallout from the global coronavirus pandemic that has wiped out jobs, decimated incomes and is threatening to push the economy into a recession, Pace University is now offering its career services resources to parents of students who have lost jobs, the University today announced.

In extending its full range of resources, relationships, recruitment and know-how to include parents adversely affected by economic fallout of this crisis, Pace's department of Career Services stands ready to help families in need find employment.

"Pace has a long tradition of creating opportunities for our students," said President Marvin Krislov. "In this uncertain time, we're very pleased to do the same for Pace families by extending Career Services placement expertise to parents of our students. We know that student success is directly tied to family stability, but, more important, it's the right thing to do at a time when people need us most."

In addition to providing career services to adults, Pace University is providing supplies for front-line health care workers, sending volunteers to much needed hospitals and medical centers in the region, and marshaling its resources to assist those who need help, Krislov noted.

This is the first time Pace Career Services is being offered beyond students and alumni population to include current parents. Historically, Pace has some of the strongest job placement outcomes among undergraduate and graduate students. It's one of the many reasons that Pace is ranked number one in upward economic mobility among four-year private universities according to a study conducted by Harvard University's Opportunity Insights.

Read the full Patch article.

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