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Politico featured Pace University in "POLITICO New York Education"

06/18/2020

Politico featured Pace University in "POLITICO New York Education"

Pace University is offering a new Master of Science in Quantitative Economic Analysis.

 

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"Politico" featured Elisabeth Haub School of Law distinguished fellow in criminal justice Mimi Rocah in "Justice’s election-year conundrum: How to probe team Trump"

12/02/2019

"Politico" featured Elisabeth Haub School of Law distinguished fellow in criminal justice Mimi Rocah in "Justice’s election-year conundrum: How to probe team Trump"

“We’ve done investigations based on a lot less than what we’ve heard already,” said Mimi Rocah, a former assistant U.S. attorney from the Southern District of New York.

“I’m inherently suspicious, which is sad,” said Rocah, a distinguished fellow at Pace University’s law school who specialized in organized crime cases while working at SDNY from 2001 to 2017. “I would not have been suspicious of that, but I am because of Trump’s weaponization and Barr’s weaponization of DOJ for political purposes.”

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'Politico" featured Elisabeth Haub School of Law's Distinguished Criminal Justice Fellow Mimi Rocah in "‘Thin to win’: How Democrats are building the case against Trump"

11/05/2019

'Politico" featured Elisabeth Haub School of Law's Distinguished Criminal Justice Fellow Mimi Rocah in "‘Thin to win’: How Democrats are building the case against Trump"

Leaked testimony also shows that House investigators have been homing in on whether Trump directed his advisers to pressure Ukraine into a quid pro quo—a finding that could be key to the impeachment inquiry’s popularity with the public, said Mimi Rocah, a former federal prosecutor in the Southern District of New York.

“You could have an abuse of power without having bribery and a quid pro quo,” Rocah said. “Just asking a foreign power to intervene in our election is an abuse of power.”

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"Politico" featured the Elisabeth Haub School of Law's Environmental Law Program professor Karl Coplan in "Get ready for the climate marathon"

09/05/2019

"Politico" featured the Elisabeth Haub School of Law's Environmental Law Program professor Karl Coplan in "Get ready for the climate marathon"

...Most of the Democratic candidates back implementing a Green New Deal and renewing the United States' commitment to the Paris climate agreement, and they’ve set a timeline to cut emissions. But tonight could offer more insight into where the candidates differ. Karl Coplan, professor of law in the Environmental Law Program at Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law, told ME nuances could emerge like on how they'd deal with nuclear energy or natural gas, their plan's impact on gas prices and whether they'd implement a carbon tax.

Coplan pointed specifically to the importance of getting more clarity on how candidates will actually put their proposals into effect. "There's kind of a mixed history in environmental legislation generally about congressional goals without implementation measures," he said, listing the Clean Water Act as an example. A lot, he said, depends on "just how tough the implementation measures are going to be." 

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"POLITICO Magazine" featured Pace Law professor Mimi Rocah in "The Surprises in the Mueller Report"

04/19/2019

"POLITICO Magazine" featured Pace Law professor Mimi Rocah in "The Surprises in the Mueller Report"

Mueller’s writings on obstruction suggest he believed ‘the final decision should go to Congress’

Mimi Rocah is a distinguished fellow in criminal justice at Pace Law and a legal analyst for MSNBC and NBC News.

The most surprising thing I’ve learned so far from the unredacted portions of the Mueller Report is how significant the case of obstruction of justice is against Trump, and just how badly Barr mischaracterized the report, both in his four-page letter to Congress and Thursday morning at his press conference. Barr clearly tried to give the impression that it was an open question on obstruction that Mueller simply didn’t reach. But I don’t read it that way. I read Mueller’s decision on obstruction to be that there was a lot of evidence of obstruction and evidence of criminal intent (which Mueller indicated in his explanation for why he didn’t pursue the interview with Trump), and that the final decision should go to Congress.

This seems to be the most potentially consequential part for the presidency, because I think it requires Mueller’s immediate testimony and potentially the beginning of impeachment hearings if we don’t want this behavior repeated in future presidencies.

One redaction that looks important starts on volume 1, page 51. The section titled “Trump Campaign and the Dissemination of Hacked Materials” is largely redacted due to the potential bring “harm to ongoing matter.” Which matter is that, and will we see the results of that publicly at some point?

***

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"Politico Magazine" featured Pace Haub Law School Professor Mimi Rocah in "Has the President Been Exonerated?"

03/25/2019

"Politico Magazine" featured Pace Haub Law School Professor Mimi Rocah in "Has the President Been Exonerated?"

We asked top legal experts to decode the attorney general’s summary of the Mueller report—and what it means for Donald Trump.

Attorney General William Barr’s summary of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report is already being interpreted in conflicting ways. In a letter to Congress on Sunday afternoon, Barr conveyed that Mueller “did not find that the Trump campaign or anyone associated with it conspired or coordinated with Russia” in the 2016 election. According to Barr, on the question of whether President Donald Trump obstructed justice, the special counsel’s report neither concludes that the president committed a crime, nor exonerates him. But Barr and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein concluded themselves, based on Mueller’s report, that there is not enough evidence to charge Trump with obstruction. By Sunday evening, the president and his fans were celebrating. “No Collusion, No Obstruction, Complete and Total EXONERATION. KEEP AMERICA GREAT!” tweeted @realDonaldTrump. But many of his critics argued that it is impossible to say whether Trump is wholly innocent without seeing the underlying information in Mueller’s report—not to mention that other investigations into Trump’s dealings are ongoing.

So, what should we believe now that we’ve gotten a glimpse into Mueller’s findings? Politico Magazine surveyed some of the smartest legal minds out there—prosecutors, professors and more—and asked: Is the president in the clear? Here’s what they told us.

‘We need many more details’

Mimi Rocah is a distinguished fellow in criminal justice at Pace Law and a legal analyst for MSNBC and NBC News.
I’m not satisfied at all with Barr’s summary—it leaves too many unanswered questions. And so, I do not think anyone can credibly say right now that Trump has been “exonerated” in the way that Trump would like to claim. In particular, it seems that a lot of prosecutorial discretion was used by Barr and Rosenstein to conclude that Trump did not commit the crime of obstruction of justice. They put reliance on the fact that no underlying crime was established. But prosecutors charge obstruction even without an underlying crime frequently. And the conclusion that his obstructive behavior was “without a nexus to a pending or contemplated proceeding” seems odd in the face of an ongoing FBI investigation. We need many more details to understand those conclusions. Even the statement as to the Russian conspiracy is vague—the “investigation did not establish that members of the Trump campaign conspired or coordinated” with Russian about the election. What does “did not establish” mean? I have consistently said that I would have faith in Mueller’s findings and conclusions. But we don’t have those yet.

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