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"Local 10" featured Lubin School of Business professor Randi Priluck in "New app promises to spice up your Instagram Stories"

11/13/2019

"Local 10" featured Lubin School of Business professor Randi Priluck in "New app promises to spice up your Instagram Stories"

"It's really for people who care very strongly about what they look like online, and how they are perceived online," said Randi Priluck, a marketing professor at Pace University who studies social media. "Most people will just use the tools already available [on Instagram]."

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"CNN Business" featured Lubin marketing professor Randi Priluck in "They left Facebook to make an app that will spice up your Instagram Stories"

11/13/2019

"CNN Business" featured Lubin marketing professor Randi Priluck in "They left Facebook to make an app that will spice up your Instagram Stories"

"It's really for people who care very strongly about what they look like online, and how they are perceived online," said Randi Priluck, a marketing professor at Pace University who studies social media. "Most people will just use the tools already available [on Instagram]."

Read the CNN Business article.

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"360 Magazine" featured Lubin Professor Randi Priluck in "Twitter bans free speech?"

11/05/2019

"360 Magazine" featured Lubin Professor Randi Priluck in "Twitter bans free speech?"

Twitter has banned all political ads on its platform becoming a hero for a day. It was a surprising move given the reluctance of tech companies to get involved in the content posted on their sites. Like most such actions, the actual impact will hardly be noticeable. Since Twitter is the only site to ban political ads, people will still be exposed to paid content from candidates on other larger networks. According to ComScore, Facebook and Google have significantly more unique users in the US than Twitter, so people will still be exposed to online political advertising. Second, Twitter makes news when influential people tweet. The more outrageous the statement, the more likely the information will spread, not only on Twitter, but in traditional news outlets as well. Pairing that with the fact that people tend to trust paid less than organic content, the tweets will still hit their targets who will be even more likely to believe what they read.

So, is it a public good that Twitter is banning political ads or not? It’s certainly a relatively easy thing for Twitter to do. It is much more difficult to monitor the ads and determine their veracity. This process would require flagging suspicious content and hiring people to evaluate the messages. The problem is that banning all political ads means that candidates who do not have strong Twitter followings will be less able to reach audiences with their messages, thus giving even more power to the powerful.

Artificial intelligence techniques are improving and tech firms may have more tools in the future to effectively monitor. In 2018 Instagram announced that they are using a machine learning platform called DeepText to detect bullying language. This kind of technology could be applied to political ads to flag them for internal review. However, the platforms may be reluctant to adopt the monitoring technologies because of the potential for increased scrutiny of their businesses by political and governmental entities.

Read the 360 Magazine article.

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"Somag News" featured Lubin's Randi Priluck, professor and assistant dean at Pace University in "Instagram Brings New Feature to Fight Cyber Bullying "

10/04/2019

"Somag News" featured Lubin's Randi Priluck, professor and assistant dean at Pace University in "Instagram Brings New Feature to Fight Cyber Bullying "

Cyber ​​bullying has become a problem that affects almost everyone. Knowing that this is a big problem, Instagram, bullying users without realizing ‘restricting’ announced the new feature.

Instagram, which says it wants to lead the fight against online bullying in social networks, reveals a new feature. The latest feature, called “Restrict,” published on Wednesday, will help combat bullying. The feature has been tested since July.

The “Restrict” feature allows you to prevent others from seeing comments from this person. Restricted users cannot see if you are active on Instagram or whether they read their messages directly. Instagram users can also choose to show the restricted person’s comments to others by approving their comments. Randi Priluck, professor and assistant dean at Pace University, focused on social media and mobile marketing. “It’s better for Instagram to do nothing than to do anything. But the question is: How much will this work? ” said.

According to a 2018 study by Pew, fifty percent of young people in the United States are bullying or harassing online. According to another study by a non-profit bullying group, 42% of cyberbullying victims between the ages of 12 and 20 are bullying themselves on Instagram. According to Instagram, a ‘bully’, blocking, discontinuing or reporting, can end up in the unpredictable behavior of the bullying person. With the restriction feature, Instagram users can protect themselves without notifying the bully.

Co-director of the Cyber Bullying Research Center and a professor at Florida Atlantic University. We need to see to what extent the feature works and whether the critical mass of Instagram users is using it, said Sameer Hinduja. Instagram had previously developed a new tool with artificial intelligence to assess whether a comment was published or not before being published.

Read the full article.

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"KTLA" featured Randi Priluck, a professor and associate dean at Pace University in "Instagram Rolls Out 'Restrict' Feature to Help Fight Bullying"

10/04/2019

"KTLA" featured Randi Priluck, a professor and associate dean at Pace University in "Instagram Rolls Out 'Restrict' Feature to Help Fight Bullying"

“The fact that Instagram is doing something is better than nothing,” said Randi Priluck, a professor and associate dean at Pace University focused on social media and mobile marketing. “But the question is: How much will this help?”

Read the full article.

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"CNN Business" featured Lubin associate dean and social media and mobile marketing Professor Randi Priluck in "Instagram rolls out new feature to help fight bullying"

10/02/2019

"CNN Business" featured Lubin associate dean and social media and mobile marketing Professor Randi Priluck in "Instagram rolls out new feature to help fight bullying"

Earlier this year, Instagram head Adam Mosseri declared that the social network wants to "lead the fight against online bullying." On Wednesday, the social media platform announced a new effort in that daunting task: it's rolling out globally a feature called "Restrict," a tool it's been testing since July. When you "Restrict" another user, comments on your posts from that person are only visible to them, and not to other people. Restricted users also won't be able to see if you're active on Instagram at any given moment or if you've read their direct messages.

Users can also opt to make a restricted person's comments show up for others by approving their comments. "The fact that Instagram is doing something is better than nothing," said Randi Priluck, a professor and associate dean at Pace University focused on social media and mobile marketing. "But the question is: How much will this help?" Fifty-nine percent of US teens have been bullied or harassed online, according to a 2018 study from Pew. Another study conducted by a non-profit anti-bullying group found that 42% of cyberbullying victims between the ages of 12 and 20 said they were bullied on Instagram. Instagram's reasoning for developing Restrict is that young Instagram users may be wary of blocking, unfollowing or reporting a bully because it could make the situation worse. Blocking or unfollowing the person could also make it harder to keep tabs on the bully's behavior. If Restrict works as intended, it could offer a way for users to protect themselves without notifying the person who is bullying them. Instagram is launching Restrict mode worldwide.

Read the full article.

 

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"Digital Information World" featured Lubin School of Business and Associate Dean Randi Priluck in "Users Have Some Interesting Reactions To Instagram Hiding the Number of Likes- Say It Won't Solve The Issue"

08/29/2019

"Digital Information World" featured Lubin School of Business and Associate Dean Randi Priluck in "Users Have Some Interesting Reactions To Instagram Hiding the Number of Likes- Say It Won't Solve The Issue"

Being an avid Instagram user, have you ever wished to get more likes on your photo? While the answer would most probably be a hesitant ‘yes’, we all have been obsessed about the likes to a point that we know even follow the right time to post the picture on Instagram or even delete it when you don’t get likes in an impressive amount right within the first hour. But that is where things are actually wrong for your mental well-being.

People have gradually started to care about the likes on their Instagram post a bit too much and that is also giving birth to unnecessary stress that Instagram never wanted to promote among its users. So, taking the matter into its own hands, Instagram has announced to hide the number of likes for users across Canada, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Brazil, Australia and New Zealand. The company is using this move as a test to minimize the impact of perfect Instagram posts on users - which led to dangerous repercussions like more pressure on people regarding the validation of a post by friends and the ever increasing negative body image that was shattering the confidence of people.

The number of likes that you get on Instagram have actually started to make people more popular in real life as well. They feel good about themselves right within a few minutes as they get the validation from their followers right away about things they wear or stuff they do. Hence, if we go by the human nature, the more confident you are, the better you would be. But when people don’t get the likes, that is where the trouble begins. Based on the number of likes and opinion from the virtual world, people start to think small about themselves.

In response to this ever growing concern, Instagram decided to hide the total number of likes on photos and videos on the main feed, profiles and permalink pages. The owner of the account can still see the likes on his own photo but when checking out the posts of others, you will only get the name of someone you follow, who has liked the post “and others” as a replacement to number of likes. Users can still click on “others” to see who else have liked the photo but Instagram won’t show an exact number to that.

As this trick has generally been perceived well, a 27-year-old freelance photographer - Chris Grundy from Sydney Australia expressed her views about the change in a much better way by stating:

"It got to a stage where people didn't appreciate a photo for the content they saw. It was more about this person has 5,000 likes and judging a photo based on that ... and people were comparing themselves to others, which has led to a lot of mental health issues,"

However a strong argument to this came in by Sasha Fekula, an American currently living in Sydney, Australia, as she said that people are always still going to be more concerned about how many likes do they get - as Instagram still allows them to count it by going to the likes section themselves.

Randi Priluck, a professor and associate dean at Pace University focused on social media and mobile marketing, expressed the similar concern by telling that it can be great for teenagers where they won’t check out their level of popularity among other kids. However, the likes that they would be able to see is the actual reason of them being driven by rewards and feel neglected. It might encourage people to go for more authentic content instead of what will be liked, but the problem of validation would still remain the same.

Another user also admitted that the move hasn’t really affected the way she posts on Instagram. Erin Good shared.

"Especially living in New Zealand, I know if I post at 8 p.m. [my time], everyone back home is asleep, so I'm not going to post. I don't think I'll change that now that the likes are hidden. I think it's more about wanting people to see what I'm up to."

Instagram is waiting for more detailed results of this test before they roll out the change to other countries. Apart from that the company has also planned to tackle bullying this year with advanced features that would warn the user about their comments being offensive before they post it.

Even the action against bullying was also taken right after Niamh Quirke, a 26-year-old Instagram user who recently moved to New York from Ireland, shared her opinion about the process.

She told that hiding likes won’t mean hiding comments. Words can do more damage than likes and especially in a society where people are more about hate than love.

All in all, it’s good to see Instagram acknowledging what’s important for platform and mental peace of its users.

Read the article.

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