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Sally Dickerson | PACE UNIVERSITY

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WalletHub featured Dyson Professor Sally Dickerson in "2021 Most and Least Stressed States"

03/29/2021

WalletHub featured Dyson Professor Sally Dickerson in "2021 Most and Least Stressed States"

What tips do you have for fighting stress without spending money?

There are many ways to engage in stress reduction without spending money. Social support or feeling connected to others is one of the best ways to combat stress – and so reaching out to a friend or family member via phone, text, or video chat is a great strategy. Exercise is also wonderful for stress reduction; a free option would be taking a walk or going for a run (and being outdoors in nature can also be stress-reducing). Meditation, yoga, tai chi, and other mindful movement practices have been shown to reduce stress and improve mood – and there are some free apps that you can download to guide you through these techniques.

Should insurance companies cover treatments that help reduce stress?

There is a large body of research evidence documenting the negative effects of chronic stressors on disease incidence, morbidity, and mortality. Stressors can also lead to shifts in immunologic functioning and stress-related hormones that can have health implications. There are a growing number of empirically-supported interventions or treatments (e.g., meditation, yoga, cognitive-behavioral stress management techniques) that can reduce the impact of stressors on health outcomes. Decreasing rates of stress-induced disease are not only good for individuals in terms of their health and well-being, but it is also ultimately good for insurance companies.

Read the full WalletHub article.

 

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Bustle featured Dyson Professor Sally Dickerson in "The Guilt And Shame Pandemic"

01/14/2021

Bustle featured Dyson Professor Sally Dickerson in "The Guilt And Shame Pandemic"

Considering the damage that stress can do to the immune system, could feelings of intense guilt and shame also put you at greater risk during a pandemic? “There is some evidence linking either chronic or short-term experiences of shame with inflammation,” writes Sally Dickerson, a professor of psychology at Pace University who co-authored a study on the subject in 2004, in an email. But, she adds, it’s not clear whether these changes in inflammatory activity would be enough to alter disease course for someone with COVID.

Read the full Bustle article.