main navigation
my pace

Times Union | PACE UNIVERSITY

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Times Union featured Elisabeth Haub School of Law professor Bennett Gershman in "Issue of judicial discretion becoming focus of bail reform"

01/16/2020

Times Union featured Elisabeth Haub School of Law professor Bennett Gershman in "Issue of judicial discretion becoming focus of bail reform"

Bennett Gershman, a law professor at Pace University said judicial discretion just means a judge behaving reasonably.

“The judge is going to have to state a reason on the record why he believes bail might be in the public interest,” he said. “And those reasons are going to have to be weightier than perhaps reasons judges might’ve given in the past.”

Read the full Times Union article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Times Union featured Dean Horace E. Anderson Jr. in "Horace E. Anderson Jr. Named Ninth Dean of the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University"

12/18/2019

Times Union featured Dean Horace E. Anderson Jr. in "Horace E. Anderson Jr. Named Ninth Dean of the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University"

Horace E. Anderson Jr. has been appointed the ninth dean of the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University, President Marvin Krislov announced today.

Prior to this appointment, Anderson had been serving as Haub Law’s interim dean. The school has been thriving under his leadership, with increased enrollment and application numbers and successful new programs, such as the expansion of its part-time J.D. program to include an evening and weekend option. This year, for the first time, U.S. News & World Report recognized Haub Law as having the No. 1 environmental law program in the country.

“Horace is the right person to lead Haub Law to a strong and successful future," said Marvin Krislov, Pace's president. “His vision for Haub Law has brought great successes during his time as interim dean, including our new U.S. News ranking as the No. 1 environmental law program in the country. I know the faculty, staff, and students join me in congratulating him on this well-deserved new role.”

Read the full Times Union article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Times Union" featured the executive director of the Pace University Law School Energy and Climate Center, Karl R. Rábago's piece "Commentary: Remove state barrier to clean energy"

05/29/2019

"Times Union" featured the executive director of the Pace University Law School Energy and Climate Center, Karl R. Rábago's piece "Commentary: Remove state barrier to clean energy"

Recently, the U.S. reached an earth-shattering milestone when the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere rose above any previously recorded level in human history — and it's still climbing. This frightening reality means the battle against climate change and fight to save our planet has never been more urgent.

The problem? New York's broken Article 10 permitting and certification process by which renewable projects are supposed to be approved is jeopardizing the state's clean energy future.

Enacted in 2011, Article 10 was intended to create an expedited and unified process to move renewable energy facilities through the Department of Public Service's (DPS) siting board process. Article 10 was supposed to be an improvement on requiring project developers to apply for numerous state and local permits. By placing project licensing in the hands of a state body appointed by the governor, the statute acknowledged that these decisions are of statewide importance.

But instead of streamlining the process, Article 10 has become a roadblock mired in red tape, bureaucracy and NIMBY politics.

Forty-two wind and solar projects have initiated the Article 10 process since 2012. Only one has received a conditional approval and it still has yet to break ground. For any state — and certainly one that claims to be a national leader in clean energy — that's abysmal performance.

The major delays in the Article 10 process pose grave risks to New York's clean energy goals because the federal solar investment tax credit and the production tax credit will begin to sunset in 2020 under President Donald Trump. If projects can't clear the Article 10 gauntlet in time, they will leave money on the table or not go on at all.

Together, these licensing delays and financial risks are major blows to New York's clean energy agenda. And the only way the state can stay on track to achieve its ambitious commitments is to take immediate regulatory action to fix Article 10. We don't need to rewrite the whole law but it's past time to make sure it gets the job done.

Here are a few ways the state can step in:

First and most critically, the DPS must mandate that the required timelines under Article 10 are met. Every time. Too often, state agencies and developers get caught up in a back and forth paper shuffle that repeatedly delays projects by months and even years. This is despite the urgent need to deliver renewable electricity to our grid. Timelines set forth in the law should be followed, period.

Second, the DPS needs to conduct a thorough audit of the siting board regulations and propose amendments to reduce the complexity of Article 10. Local communities are not provided a framework to untangle the participation process, while renewable developers working to invest in the state are repeatedly confounded by the overly burdensome nature of the law. This is killing development.

Third, New York should spearhead a public awareness campaign on the economic benefits of renewable energy for rural communities. Wind and solar projects have the potential to create thousands of good-paying jobs and inject tens of millions of dollars into local communities to improve schools, roads and bridges and health care. There is no quick fix for rural communities hit hard by the recession, but there are new opportunities on the horizon. This one deserves a hard look.

Bottom line: The growing threat of climate change demands big investments in renewable energy to protect our planet and safeguard our future. But under the current Article 10 timelines and existing processes, Cuomo's Green New Deal will not reach its goal of 100 percent carbon-free electricity by 2040. We can't afford to compromise our clean energy future. New York must seize the moment — and the power of wind and solar — and fix Article 10 now.

Karl R. Rábago is the executive director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center at Pace University's Elisabeth Haub School of Law in White Plains.

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Times Union" featured Pace University's Law School in "Schenectady's proposed straw ban debated"

05/08/2019

"Times Union" featured Pace University's Law School in "Schenectady's proposed straw ban debated"

...The ban on plastic straws in the Bethlehem school district took effect April 29. Additionally, the Starpoint district in Lockport has also enacted a ban. And Syracuse University and Pace University Law School have banned plastic straws, opting instead for paper.

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Times Union" featured Pace University in "Your best shot"

02/14/2019

"Times Union" featured Pace University in "Your best shot"

Last month, students from Ravena-Coeymans-Selkirk High School participated in the Albany Academy FIRST Tech Challenge competition. According to the school, they were awarded the Collins Aerospace Award for the most innovative and creative robot design solution and were invited to participate in the regional competition at PACE University on Feb. 10, where their team placed fifth overall.

Read the article.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Times Union" featured Haub Law Professors Michael Mushlin and Bennett Gershman piece "Is justice best served by never-ending punishment?"

04/17/2018

"Times Union" featured Haub Law Professors Michael Mushlin and Bennett Gershman piece "Is justice best served by never-ending punishment?"

Michael B. Mushlin and Bennett L. Gershman are professors of law at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University.

Forty-seven years ago Herman Bell, along with two other men, ambushed and fatally shot New York City police officers Joseph Piagentini and Waverly Jones outside a housing project in Harlem. The officers were chosen for death simply because they were police officers. Bell was convicted of murder and sentenced to 25 years to life in prison, where he has been incarcerated in maximum security for the past four decades.

During this time Bell has aged from an angry and belligerent young man to an elderly and mature man who has been a constructive force for improving the condition of his fellow prisoners and bettering the life of those in the outside world. He is genuinely remorseful for the terrible pain he caused and is dedicated to making the remaining years of his life useful and meaningful for others.

In granting Bell parole, the parole board decided he has been punished enough and is entitled to release. The board's decision was based on Bell's lengthy period of confinement, his good record in prison, his genuine pain and sorrow for his heinous crime, and the almost nonexistent risk of recidivism. Indeed, New York's Department of Corrections and Community Supervision's own data reflects Bell's minimal risk to public safety; people over 65 with murder-related convictions have the lowest risk of recidivism. The board's decision also may have been influenced by a powerful letter in which Jones' son expressed forgiveness for Bell's killing his father and said that paroling Bell would bring Jones's family "joy and peace." Denying Bell parole, he wrote, "would cause us pain as we are reminded of the painful episode each time he appears before the board."

It is noteworthy that New York's parole board was reconstituted by Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who appointed new board members who in turn promulgated new regulations designed to make parole less vindictive and more focused on rehabilitation. The board's decision to parole Bell underscores the board's new approach. In the past, release on parole was rare. Today parole is more available to people who legitimately have earned it.

The decision to parole Bell has generated understandable opposition from many quarters, including New York City Mayor Bill DiBlasio, the Patrolmen's Benevolent Association, and Piagentini's family. Indeed, Diane Piagentini, Joseph Piagentini's widow, supported by the police union, has petitioned the state Supreme Court to rescind the April 17 parole, claiming that "parole is not appropriate for cold-blooded cop-killers."

We, and over a hundred organizations, believe the board did the right thing. The board emphasized that rehabilitation is a meaningful goal in our penal system and that continued vengeance needs to be tempered with justice and mercy. Otherwise parole becomes a meaningless abstraction.

We understand but strongly disagree with the position of Diane Piagentini and the police unions. This was a horrible crime committed many years ago during incendiary times by a young man with a warped political ideology. He has been in prison for over 44 years. He is a changed man. He has expressed remorse and will be a constructive force for society's betterment. Will keeping him in prison until he dies contribute to public safety? Should hatred and vengeance continue to drive our penal system? Or is justice and humanity better served by paroling him?

Read the article.

 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed