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"U.S. News and World Report" featured the College of Health Professions assistant professor and founding director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program Christen Cupples Cooper in "9 Healthy Holiday Snacks"

11/25/2019

"U.S. News and World Report" featured the College of Health Professions assistant professor and founding director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program Christen Cupples Cooper in "9 Healthy Holiday Snacks"

While the holiday season may be the most joyous time of year, it's not necessarily the easiest if you're trying to maintain a healthy eating regimen. The challenges are real – but they're also manageable, says Christen Cupples Cooper, an assistant professor and founding director of the Nutrition and Dietetics Program at Pace University in Pleasantville, New York.

"Just because candy canes, chocolates, cookies and holiday fare line almost every aisle of every store this time of year doesn’t mean you need to buy and consume these products," Cooper says. "Keep the holidays framed in your mind as a celebration and regard food as one element, but not the centerpiece of the entire holiday season."

You can limit holiday snacking by keeping your distance from the food table and focusing on talking to family and friends instead of grazing, she suggests. And if you are going to snack, opt for healthy options.

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"U.S. News & World Report" featured Lewis J. Altfest, a professor of finance at Pace University's Lubin School of Business in "How to Make Dividends Work for You"

11/06/2019

"U.S. News & World Report" featured Lewis J. Altfest, a professor of finance at Pace University's Lubin School of Business in "How to Make Dividends Work for You"

“Saving dividends in cash for future investment in other assets or depositing in a tax-advantaged retirement account like a 401(k) when you haven’t maxed out your allowed amount is an excellent choice,” says Lewis J. Altfest, a professor of finance at Pace University's Lubin School of Business.

Aside from reinvestment – “an excellent approach,” Alfest says – "others such as investments in growing developing markets can be rewarding as well and can work in tandem with more conservative high-dividend-payout companies.”

There are also less conventional ways to use your dividends, such as to stem needless financial loss.

If you've run up a high-interest credit card balance, for example, applying a one-time dividend disbursement to wipe it out could multiply its value. Suppose you have a $1,000 balance at 19% interest and would otherwise pay off just $50 a month. If you eliminate all that debt by using a $1,000 dividend return, you'll save $212 in interest charges: a significant amount, given that any investor would be thrilled with a return in excess of 20%.

While such a scenario eliminates the compounding that comes with reinvesting, it still produces a financial benefit by the numbers. And that at least compares very well to another use that puts the “end” in dividends.

Says Alfest: “Spending them mindlessly prior to retirement doesn’t add up.”

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"US News & World Report" featured Pace University in "How International Students Can Practice English"

09/10/2019

"US News & World Report" featured Pace University in "How International Students Can Practice English"

Learn English From U.S. Instructors, Locals or Mentors

Prospective international students may also want to consider learning American English through a summer program on a U.S. university campus.

"One of the best ways for international students to improve their English-language speaking skills is to participate in an English-language intensive program," Cashel says.

She says many U.S. colleges – such as Pace University in New York, Yale University in Connecticut and Columbia University in New York – have such programs during the summer.

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U.S. News & World Report" featured Bruce Bachenheimer, a clinical professor of management at Pace's Lubin School of Business in "Is an MBA Worth It? How to Decide"

05/21/2019

"U.S. News & World Report" featured Bruce Bachenheimer, a clinical professor of management at Pace's Lubin School of Business in "Is an MBA Worth It? How to Decide"

...Bruce Bachenheimer, a clinical professor of management at Pace University's Lubin School of Business in New York City, says that project-based learning activities in MBA courses allow students to practice solving real business problems. Ultimately, this can help students become more creative thinkers, and he says this type of education tends to have a lasting impact.

Bachenheimer adds that an MBA can offer a formative experience that helps a student shape his or her professional identity. "An MBA can be much more than the knowledge and skills acquired through coursework; it can truly expand you and your world," he wrote in an email.

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"U.S. News & World Report" featured Pace's executive director of career services Phyllis Mooney and international student Rounak Agarwal in "Learn About Internships for International Students"

05/15/2019

"U.S. News & World Report" featured Pace's executive director of career services Phyllis Mooney and international student Rounak Agarwal in "Learn About Internships for International Students"

As an international student from India, Rounak Agarwal started looking for internships during his sophomore year at Pace University in New York, where he is majoring in economics with a minor in business analytics. Agarwal, a rising senior, has had two internships so far in the financial services industry, as a finance intern at Playfair Planning Services and mortgage analyst at Emigrant Bank.

He says his internship at the bank, where he has worked as a paid intern since September 2018, has been a good opportunity since he wants to start his career in the financial services industry. "This internship provided me with great knowledge into the mortgage and lending areas," Agarwal says.

As prospective international students search for and apply to U.S. colleges, they may want to start thinking about internships. For students who have not yet enrolled, here are some things to know about how internships work in the U.S.

Eligibility. Experts say eligibility for internships is based on the visa status a student plans to get.

"F-1 students are eligible to intern off campus, which is called Curricular Practical Training, CPT, after two full academic semesters at the university, not including summer sessions," says Phyllis Mooney, executive director of career services at Pace University.

Mooney says if a student has completed a previous degree in the U.S. and has already been issued an F-1 visa for that degree, he or she does not have to wait two academic semesters to start an internship. She says students transferring in from another college do not have to wait either, unless they enter Pace with only one semester from a previous institution, in which case they would only wait for one semester versus one full academic year.

Mooney says for those who are on a J-1 exchange visitor visa, eligibility works slightly differently.

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"US News" featured Lubin School of Business Professor of Management Eric H. Kessler in "Investor Patience Is Key When Bad News Happens"

04/17/2019

"US News" featured Lubin School of Business Professor of Management Eric H. Kessler in "Investor Patience Is Key When Bad News Happens"

"Perception is reality: It matters whether investors think a company is great," says Eric H. Kessler, the Henry George Professor of Management at Pace University's Lubin School of Business. And that's potentially worse news on top of Boeing's bad news, since spooked investors have a knack for fanning flames before the executive suite can put out the fire.

"Investors make systematic, predictable errors when making such judgments," Kessler says. "For example, and potentially relevant to this case, people typically put too much weight on recent, colorful information – like crashes – that easily come to mind." And let's face it, air disaster stories tend to make for a more compelling read than the fine print in the quarterly report about earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization.

"So even if the fundamentals are sound there still might be irrational overreactions due to the prevalence of this mental shortcut," Kessler says.

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