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USA Today featured Lubin Professor Andrew Coggins in "Why are airlines still flying in and out of US coronavirus hot spots and will they continue?"

04/01/2020

USA Today featured Lubin Professor Andrew Coggins in "Why are airlines still flying in and out of US coronavirus hot spots and will they continue?"

To avoid conditions becoming more dire, Andrew Coggins, a clinical professor of management at Pace University, suggested measures such as taking the temperature of passengers before they board planes, to avoid halting flights. No U.S. airlines have announced such measures before takeoff.

“It’ll wreak havoc on the plane turn-around times, but it’ll signal to the passengers that the airlines take their health seriously,” Coggins said. “If you know or have indications that you may be sick, you should not fly!”

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USA Today featured Lubin Professor Andrew Coggins Jr. in "Diamond Princess, Grand Princess cruise line had high rates of illness even before coronavirus"

03/23/2020

USA Today featured Lubin Professor Andrew Coggins Jr. in "Diamond Princess, Grand Princess cruise line had high rates of illness even before coronavirus"

“Once someone made their final payment, if they can go from toilet to toilet, they are going to go on their cruise ship,” said Andrew Coggins Jr., a professor in the business school at Pace University in New York who specializes in the cruise industry.

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USA Today featured Lubin Professor Andrew Coggins in "'They're getting pummeled': Travel industry reeling from coronavirus concerns, anxiety"

03/11/2020

USA Today featured Lubin Professor Andrew Coggins in "'They're getting pummeled': Travel industry reeling from coronavirus concerns, anxiety"

Andrew Coggins, a clinical professor of management at Pace University, said fear is a cruise company's chief enemy. "It's probably more psychological, especially when the government comes out and says, 'Don't take cruises,'" he added. "The industry is pretty resilient. It's a question of how long this will last."

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USA Today featured Haub Law Professor Bennett Gershman in "Four career prosecutors are now the target of Trump's anger. Here's how they came up with a stiff sentence for Roger Stone"

02/13/2020

USA Today featured Haub Law Professor Bennett Gershman in "Four career prosecutors are now the target of Trump's anger. Here's how they came up with a stiff sentence for Roger Stone"

Bennett Gershman, a Pace University School of Law professor and a legal expert on prosecutorial misconduct, called Trump’s accusation "an absurd characterization." "The only way you could argue that," he said, "is if the prosecutors were acting in bad faith—they don’t believe that he (Stone) deserved this kind of punishment and they were making the sentencing recommendation for, let’s say, political reasons."

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USA Today featured Lubin School of Business professor Andrew Coggins in "As coronavirus spreads on cruise ships, what does it mean for cruisers and cruise lines? 'It's day-by-day'"

02/12/2020

USA Today featured Lubin School of Business professor Andrew Coggins in "As coronavirus spreads on cruise ships, what does it mean for cruisers and cruise lines? 'It's day-by-day'"

But are cruise lines doing the right things?

Andrew Coggins, professor at the Pace University Lubin School of Business and cruise industry analyst, called the blanket ban on China, Hong Kong and Macao passport holders "worrying."

"That smacks of racial/ethnic paranoia," he said in a statement. "Royal Caribbean has invested much time and treasure developing their China Market over the past 12 plus years. China is a proud and ancient country. Such a blanket ban will not go unnoticed."

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USA Today featured associate professor of Information Technology Professor Darren Hayes piece: "Unlocking Apple iPhones needs congressional guidance on court warrants"

01/22/2020

USA Today featured associate professor of Information Technology Professor Darren Hayes piece: "Unlocking Apple iPhones needs congressional guidance on court warrants"

Apple has historically assisted law enforcement, in possession of a warrant, with unlocking iPhones. Over time, that process changed whereby Apple would instead provide law enforcement with the evidence.

The case of the shooter in Pensacola, Florida, is interesting because iPhone unlocking solutions are available to law enforcement; GrayKey, from Grayshift, is one example.

While many law enforcement agencies and prosecutors may be content with reverting back to the old system of being provided with the evidence, the Department of Justice appears to be requesting some type of special access to decrypt the iPhone. There is no precedent to force a company to break its own encryption — hence the reemergence of the All Writs Act.

It begs the question: Do we really want to weaken encryption?

In a post-Snowden era, Apple, and other corporations, appear less willing to cooperate with government requests. Apple has removed itself from the decryption process.

Apple could still assist law enforcement by disabling security protocols on an individual iPhone to allow unlimited attempts to guess the password, making access to a phones data easier for the FBI.

Apple has not explicitly said it has opposed the idea of assisting law enforcement. In fact, Apple CEO Tim Cook previously hinted that congressional legislation may be the way forward for the two companies to formalize their cooperation.

We need congressional legislation to provide guidance about how companies must comply with court-approved warrants. Asking Apple to revert to providing evidence to investigators, without requesting an encryption backdoor, might be the best compromise.

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"USA Today" featured Elisabeth Haub School of Law professor Bennett Gershman in "'I've been dying for 25 years': How a cop has stalled his child sex abuse trial for decades"

11/22/2019

"USA Today" featured Elisabeth Haub School of Law professor Bennett Gershman in "'I've been dying for 25 years': How a cop has stalled his child sex abuse trial for decades"

Bennett Gershman, a former prosecutor and now Pace Law School professor, said the courts have made it clear the burden is on prosecutors and leans heavily toward disclosure. Failing to disclose is not a game to be won, Gershman said, but a duty designed to protect the integrity of the court system.  

“It’s dishonest if that’s the way they’re presenting the obligation of Brady,” he said.  

Gershman said the lack of tracking and policies about disclosing officers’ misconduct is troubling because it’s at the heart of the legal system’s promise to provide every defendant a fair trial – a standard  prosecutors are sworn to protect.  

“If you're putting a witness on the stand – whoever the witnesses, but particularly a police officer – and you have doubts about his credibility, doesn't that raise a question of whether you're prosecuting a guilty or an innocent person?” Gershman asked.

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