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USA TODAY Network featured Seidenberg’s Blue CoLab Director John Cronin's opinion piece "Irene Dickinson: The woman who shut down Indian Point | Opinion"

05/12/2021

USA TODAY Network featured Seidenberg’s Blue CoLab Director John Cronin's opinion piece "Irene Dickinson: The woman who shut down Indian Point | Opinion"

Bursts of sun broke the winter chill, warming the 200 anti-nuclear activists gathered in Buchanan to protest the Indian Point nuclear plants. Skull-and-crossbones picket signs dotted the air. A congresswoman and state assemblyman addressed the crowd: nuclear power is a threat to the environment; the government should invest in alternative energy. Chants of “shut it down” punctuated the speeches. The year was not 2021. It was February 29, 1976. John Cronin is director of Blue CoLab at Pace University, and the former Hudson Riverkeeper.

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The USA TODAY Network featured President Marvin Krislov teaming up with Westchester Community College President Belinda Miles in their op ed "Far too many students earn credits without completing a degree: Here’s how to change that"

04/20/2021

The USA TODAY Network featured President Marvin Krislov teaming up with Westchester Community College President Belinda Miles in their op ed "Far too many students earn credits without completing a degree: Here’s how to change that"

By Marvin Krislov and Belinda Miles: 

Today’s college students are not who you think they are.

One-third of them are more than 25 years old, according to data released last summer by Higher Learning Advocates, a nonprofit supporting student success. Nearly two in five are part-time students, that report said, and only about one in six live on campus.

What’s more, nearly 40% of today’s undergraduates are enrolled at two-year community colleges, according to the report. Some 35% will transfer to at least one different institution during their college career. About 20% are parents.

At the same time, the pandemic has caused college students to delay completing their degrees. The Strada Education Network has found that one in four college students are considering delaying graduation. And, worryingly, some 36 million Americans not currently enrolled in college have some credits but no degree, according to data from the National College Attainment Network.

For the most part, college today is no longer a four-year residential experience for a group of young people recently graduated from high school. Instead, it’s a wide-open, diverse, and dynamic landscape. And the more we embrace that reality, the more we can give today’s students the support they need to earn their college degrees.

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USA Today Network featured Dyson Professor Kiku Huckle in "Amid heat on Andrew Cuomo, Democrats face pressure to weigh in. Here's why"

03/05/2021

USA Today Network featured Dyson Professor Kiku Huckle in "Amid heat on Andrew Cuomo, Democrats face pressure to weigh in. Here's why"

Whether Democrats who don’t join the push can be susceptible to a primary challenge or see it as an issue in marginal districts will depend on the next few weeks and if more accusations are detailed, said Kiku Huckle, political science professor at Pace University. She expects that the effect on Democratic candidates at the ballot box will be minimal if the scandal doesn’t grow with elections not until 2022. “Really extreme voters would be the ones who are going to be more susceptible to basing their votes for other elected officials based on their response to Cuomo as the situation stands at this point,” Huckle said.

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USA Today Network featured Cindy Kanuser, executive director of the Women's Justice Center in "Gov. Cuomo scandal: Women often face fraught path in reporting sexual harassment"

03/03/2021

USA Today Network featured Cindy Kanuser, executive director of the Women's Justice Center in "Gov. Cuomo scandal: Women often face fraught path in reporting sexual harassment"

Cindy Kanusher, executive director of the Women's Justice Center at Pace University in Westchester County, said the response to the inappropriate behavior showed that while society has come a long way, work still needs to be done. 

The #MeToo movement, she said, has helped women come forward to report sexual harassment and assault by helping to eliminate the stigma with reporting the behavior. 

“We’re making the changes," Kanusher said. "The law is coming around. There are laws now against workplace sexual harassment. Our domestic violence laws have changed and our sexual assault laws have changed.” 

“But,” she said, “the violence against women persists.” 

 

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USA TODAY NETWORK featured Lubin Professor Philip Cohen's piece "America needs respect for tax law and order. Here's why | Opinion"

10/15/2020

USA TODAY NETWORK featured Lubin Professor Philip Cohen's piece "America needs respect for tax law and order. Here's why | Opinion"

Philip G. Cohen is a retired vice president-tax and general tax counsel for Unilever United States, Inc. and is now a professor of Taxation at Pace University's Lubin School of Business. The views expressed herein are his own and don't necessarily represent those of any organization which he is or was associated.

Both President Donald J. Trump and Vice President Joe Biden have signaled federal income tax policy changes are on the table if elected president in November — and each offer markedly different plans.

Their proposals couldn’t be more polar. Trump, for example, has indicated that he would like the corporate tax rate to be even lower than the 21% rate currently in effect, having already been reduced as part of 2017 tax legislation from 35%. He also wants to make permanent taxpayer friendly changes for individuals made by that same 2017 law that are due to expire after 2025. Furthermore, he would like to reduce the tax rate for capital gains for individuals from a top rate of 20% to 15%. 

Given our ballooning budget deficit, these should be non-starters.

Biden’s tax wish list, on the other hand, includes seeking an increase to the corporate tax rate from 21% to 28%, implementing a minimum 15% tax based on global book income of $100 million or more, and enacting a 10% surtax on companies that send jobs overseas in order to sell products back to the U.S. He also aims to increase the federal income tax owed by individuals with taxable income above $400,000, as well as remove the tax rate preference for capital gains and qualified dividends for those taxpayers with taxable income above $1 million.  Some of these proposals merit consideration although Biden should focus attention to trying to repeal some incredibly complex and unsound international tax changes made as part of the 2017 tax legislation and close some egregious loopholes in our tax laws.

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