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"WCBS 880" featured Pace University student Mia Stella in "New York State Legislators Propose Banning Texting While Walking"

05/21/2019

""WCBS 880" featured Pace University student Mia Stella in "New York State Legislators Propose Banning Texting While Walking"

People distracted by their smartphones while crossing the street could soon face hefty fines in New York.

Assemblyman Felix Ortiz and State Sen. John Liu are sponsoring a bill that would fine people caught texting while crossing the street $25 to $50 for the first offense.

“The bill is not just about enforcement. It's really more to remind New Yorkers that ‘hey, crossing the street while texting is a really, really bad idea,’” Liu said.

Repeat offenders caught within an 18-month period could be fined up to $250 for each additional instance.

Still, New Yorkers seem more ambivalent.

“I think that’s just the habit. We’re all attached to our phones,” said 18-year-old Pace University student Mia Stella, “I think that regardless if there's laws on it...if you're gonna get fined, I think people are still gonna do it regardless.”

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"WCBS Radio 880" featured Pace Law Professor Bennett Gershmanin "'Fatal Attraction' Killer Carolyn Warmus Granted Parole"

05/07/2019

"WCBS Radio 880" featured Pace Law Professor Bennett Gershmanin "'Fatal Attraction' Killer Carolyn Warmus Granted Parole"

...Ben Gershman is a law professor at Pace Law School who has followed the case since day one. He says things might be different if the case was tried today.

"There was no evidence, direct evidence that she did it. There was a lot of evidence that sort of separated her from the killing. It was a very close case," he said.

The case was dubbed the Fatal Attraction killing after the 1987 movie.

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"WCBS 880" featured Pace University's Dyson Criminal Law Professor Kimberly Collica-Cox in "Stories From Main Street: Using Dogs To Help With Incarcerated Mothers' Parenting Skills"

10/22/2018

"WCBS 880" featured Pace University's Dyson Criminal Law Professor Kimberly Collica-Cox in "Stories From Main Street: Using Dogs To Help With Incarcerated Mothers' Parenting Skills"

VALHALLA, N.Y. (WCBS 880) -- Smiles are hard to come by behind bars, but at the Westchester County Jail, some friendly dogs are changing all that.

Buddy the Labradoodle gets big hugs, and Mambo the black Lab gets plenty of love too.

“It’s a big morale booster – not only for the prisoners, but also for the staff. Everyone gets excited when they see the dogs come in,” said Pace University Criminal Law Professor Kimberly Collica-Cox.

As WCBS 880’s Sean Adams reported in this week’s edition of “Stories from Main Street,” Collica-Cox has won a National Jefferson Award for her unique parenting course for incarcerated mothers.

“I think the dogs bring out a level of caring and nurturing that you often don’t see in the corrections environment. It’s very hard for them to trust others that are here,” she said. “You can open up with the dogs, right? The dogs are very loving. They’re nonjudgmental.”

Drugs landed Rachel in jail. It’s difficult being separated from her 8-year-old son, and the dogs cheer her  up.

“They give us a lot of kisses,” she said. “They calm us down when you pet them – you know, it makes you feel better.”

Jeanette is serving a sentence for driving while intoxicated.

“It’s just a little life and innocence to the jail; comfort,” she said.

Dr. Collica-Cox aims to instill good parenting skills, so as to help  the women mend their relationships with their children and their families.

“And we use the dogs as an example, you know, of how to implement rules and what happens when we don’t implement rules, and then sort of segue into how we implement rules with children, so since the children can’t be here, they serve as a nice avatar – for example, right – in replacement from the children,” Collica-Cox said.

With help from Dr. Collica-Cox and the dogs, Rachel is determined to get back to her son.

“I think it’s going to make all of us better moms, you know? This is a dark place, you know, so it’s a light in a dark place,” Rachel said. “It helps us come out and come together as parents.”

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