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Westchester Magazine featured Haub Law Dean Horace Anderson and Coordinator for Student Development and Campus Activities Suede Graham in "Local Westchester Leaders Reflect on Race"

10/14/2020

Westchester Magazine featured Haub Law Dean Horace Anderson and Coordinator for Student Development and Campus Activities Suede Graham in "Local Westchester Leaders Reflect on Race"

– Horace Anderson Jr. –

Dean, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, Pace University, White Plains

Over the last two months, I have cycled through a number of emotions related to the killing of George Floyd. I have felt anger at the police officer who kneeled on his neck for 8 minutes and 46 seconds and at the officers who watched it happen without intervening. I’ve felt pride for the mobilization of protests by people (across generations and racial/ethnic groups) to seek redress not only for Floyd’s death but also for the deaths of others at the hands of law enforcement and the treatment of Black people by our institutions in general.

I have felt anger again at those who have co-opted the protest moment for violent and destructive ends. I have felt fear for communities wracked by the current violence, having grown up in neighborhoods that took decades to recover from the rioting of the late 1960s. I have felt fear again for my friends in law enforcement, who I think exemplify a spirit of public service and community-mindedness that is common among the majority of law enforcement officers and that I believe is achievable throughout the system.

We are scrutinizing whom we honor with statues and monuments; we are questioning how we make hiring and purchasing decisions; and we are reexamining how we police. On the other hand, I have felt pessimistic about how much we will accomplish if we are satisfied with the quick and easy answer.

If we do not move beyond the tearing down of statues to a deeper understanding of the history that led to those statues being erected in the first place, we will accomplish little. If we accept mere cosmetic changes to how we provide economic opportunity for all, we will accomplish little. If we embrace careless language about “abolishing” police that obscures the real need to balance community safety and order with the individual rights of those who have encounters with police officers, then we will accomplish little.     

Along with all of those emotions, I have found myself asking questions, all under the heading of: Why now, and what now? What is there about this moment that has brought people to the streets, to legislative halls, and to boardrooms with such antiracist fervor? The issues were not new; people of color and their allies have been speaking out about them for centuries. Did the fact that so many of us have quarantined at home give us more time to reflect? Did our inability to distract ourselves with dinners out and baseball games and Broadway shows force us to grapple with that infamous video more than we would in “normal” times? Did mass unemployment make it easier for people to take to the streets and spend hours, days, or weeks protesting? Has reporting on the disparate and devastating racial impact of the novel coronavirus provided a timely confirmation that race still matters in the United States and that the spheres in which it matters, such as housing, healthcare, and public safety, are full of life-or-death consequences? Has the pandemic created in each of us a clearer understanding that ignoring problems will not make them go away, that politicizing them can endanger lives, that leadership matters, and that we each need to play our part in bringing about the change that will lead to better outcomes?        

It will take much more time to understand the Why now? but we need to proceed with the What now? As a father, teacher, and leader of an educational institution, I have a responsibility to facilitate a better world for my sons, my students, and my community. Actually, we all have that responsibility, and we should all be looking for ways, in our homes, workplaces, and social circles, to expand opportunity, insist on equity, and ensure that some good comes out of the George Floyd tragedy.

– Suede Graham –

Coordinator for Student Development and Campus Activities, Pace University, Pleasantville

I remember the first realization that my mother and I were a different color.

Sitting in the bed of my grandpa’s truck, on a hot July afternoon in a small Arkansas town, my 4-year-old eyes rummaged back and forth between my mother’s white thigh and my caramel-colored arms.

“Momma, why aren’t you brown like me?”

My mother, a blond-haired, blue-eyed Southern belle, sat in silence, not necessarily prepared to have the birds-and-the-bees conversation with her 4-year-old son. Nervously, she grabbed me by the hand, and we scurried inside the house to the kitchen. I sat at the kitchen table and watched as she retrieved two clean glasses from the countertop, a gallon of milk from the refrigerator, and a bottle of chocolate syrup from the cupboard. She began to fill the two glasses with equal amounts of whole milk but proceeded to pour and stir Hershey’s chocolate syrup into only one of the glasses. I watched as her concoction transitioned from notebook-paper white to a color quite similar to that of my arms, legs, face, and body.

“You are just like me, Suede, with just a little bit more sweetness in you.”

To my curious mind, that all made sense. But now, as a 27-year-old Black man in America, I wonder to myself: When did that “sweetness” my mother presented to me turn into a setback?

My mother and father divorced by the time I was 2, and we soon relocated to a town full of people who looked more like my mother and not like me. In my earlier years, I never realized and grasped the idea that I was a different color than many of my friends. As I grew into a young teenager and then into an adult, navigating life in predominantly White spaces became awkward and oftentimes confusing. Being too White for the Black kids but too Black for most of the White kids, I felt the need to look, talk, dress, and act a certain way. Hannah Montana once had a song titled “The Best of Both Worlds,” but what does one do when your two worlds neither collide nor coincide?

Being biracial, specifically as a Black-and-White individual in America, understanding your identity can be elusive and arbitrary. Race can often be used to define so many aspects of our lives, and we feel as if we are forced to make a choice. We did not choose our skin color, but the world chooses to cast upon us judgments and prejudices simply because of our darker complexions.

A big part of the biracial experience in America is being treated, or not being treated, like a Black person. Because of my darker skin tone, I identify more, and live this life, as a Black man. I walk into a room and immediately search for someone in the room who may look like me.

I love my Blackness. I love my culture. I love my hair. I find joy in the things that make me unique and different.

I just wish our nation loved my people the same way that I do.

Read the full Westchester Magazine article.

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914Inc.-Westchester Magazine featured vice president of human resources Matt Renna in "Like It or Not, Remote Work is Here to Stay"

09/01/2020

914Inc.-Westchester Magazine featured vice president of human resources Matt Renna in "Like It or Not, Remote Work is Here to Stay"

When faced with similar issues, Matt Renna, vice president of human resources at Pace University, says his institution also found creative ways to address them. “In cases where there were challenges, such as workers needing computers, we allocated resources and prioritized employees in need,” he says. “While I wasn’t surprised, I was amazed at the resiliency of the Pace community to overcome this challenge. In some cases, colleagues lent iPads and laptops to each other.”

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Westchester Magazine featured Pace University Pleasantville in "How and When Westchester’s Colleges and Universities Are Reopening"

07/28/2020

Westchester Magazine featured Pace University Pleasantville in "How and When Westchester’s Colleges and Universities Are Reopening"

Pace University

Pleasantville
Pace will begin its fall semester on August 24 with a combination of in-person, online, and hybrid classes. Students will leave for Thanksgiving by November 24 and not return to campus, rather conducting their finals online from November 30 through December 5, the last day of the semester.

The return to campus will begin in phases, with essential staff returning first, followed by residential life and student-facing positions, and on-campus students moving in beginning August 14. All students and faculty must complete online health training prior to returning to campus.

Face coverings and social distancing will likewise be enforced, along with provision of additional sanitizing stations and 25% room capacity in all classrooms and lab spaces. Dining halls will eliminate self-serve options, reduce capacity, and sanitize every 30 minutes. Residence halls will feature reduced capacity and group residents as “Family Units,” which may dispense with social distancing guidelines when together. Guests will not be permitted, nor will visitation between dorm rooms (even on the same floor).

NCAA sports will proceed with their seasons, for the time being. The fitness center, however, will remain closed.

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Westchester Magazine featured Pace University President Marvin Krislov in "Here’s What’s New in Westchester Higher Education"

06/11/2020

Westchester Magazine featured Pace University President Marvin Krislov in "Here’s What’s New in Westchester Higher Education"

– Pace University –
Adapting and Changing

Facing the COVID-19 pandemic, Marvin Krislov, president of Pace University, promised that he and his administration would be “vigilant, proactive, and responsible, and keep our focus on the best interests of our students, faculty, staff, and communities. These are remarkable and unprecedented times that are requiring us to work, learn, and live in new ways.”

As the university moved to remote learning and remote work, he promised the school would “continue to fulfill our mission of preparing our students to succeed and make positive contributions in the world around them.”

Pace is changing to meet the needs of its students. “People are living and working longer, and therefore traditional models of education will change as a result,” Krislov says. “We must educate a changing workforce and create options for lifelong learning that are practical, convenient, and attainable, and provide a good return on investment.”

Using technology for distance learning was front-of-mind even before the coronavirus. “Today’s students, whether working professionals, adult learners, or traditional college students, need programs that are flexible and fit into their busy schedules,” he says. “We’re leveraging technology to enhance the educational experience, providing programs both online and in-person that are flexible, faster, and more competitively priced.”

Pace is also adding to its curriculum. Its Elisabeth Haub School of Law has a new part-time scheduling option, called the Flex JD, which includes evening and weekend classes, to make a law degree more accessible to working professionals. Haub Law has also added a climate-change career track for students focusing on environmental law and is adding courses that focus on environmental, social, and governance criteria.

The College of Health Professionals has added nine programs in the past five years, in areas such as nursing, nutrition, adult acute care, occupational therapy, and psychiatric mental health. The university is investing in and adding advanced programs in AI and data analytics at the Seidenberg School of CSIS. And Pace’s Lubin School of Business also offers a flexible MBA that reduces the time and cost that students typically invest in a traditional MBA program.

The university is investing heavily in job readiness, with career-services professionals, career fairs, internships, and workshops on résumé writing, professional branding tips, and how to negotiate a competitive salary. “Nearly 20 percent of Generation Z and young Millennials say they might choose not to attend college. They question whether a college degree is actually worth the cost,” Krislov says. “We know we must prove our value and ensure that the value proposition we offer pays dividends over a lifetime.”

Read the full Westchester Magazine article.

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Westchester Magazine featured Pace University President Marvin Krislov in "Here’s What the Westchester Economy Should Look Like in 2020"

03/03/2020

Westchester Magazine featured Pace University President Marvin Krislov in "Here’s What the Westchester Economy Should Look Like in 2020"

As Westchester enters a new decade, its college campuses are adapting to changing patterns in enrollment and areas
of study.

At Pace University, which has locations both in Westchester and New York City, “our enrollment is growing in the graduate arena,” explains Marvin Krislov, the school’s president. But that same growth doesn’t apply at the college level: “Undergraduate growth will be a little more steady,” Krislov says.

That gap might be filled by adult learners, however: “Over the next five to 10 years, more people will be going back to school,” Krislov explains. To accommodate this influx, Pace recently launched a flexible JD program at its law school in White Plains that’s designed for people who work full-time or part-time.

The programs that attract students are changing, too. Krislov says that Pace’s health curricula — from nursing and nutrition to adult care — are  expanding.  

Read the full Westchester Magazine article.

 

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Westchester Magazine featured Pace University in "HILLARY AND CHELSEA CLINTON TALK ABOUT NEW BOOK AT PACE UNIVERSITY"

12/16/2019

Westchester Magazine featured Pace University in "Hillary and Chelsea Clinton Talk about New Book at Pace University"

Hillary and Chelsea Clinton talk about their new book "The Book of Gutsy Women: Favorite Stories of Courage and Resilience” and some of their personal heroes on December 18 when they make their last stop of the tour for 2019 at Pace University. The program, starting at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6) in the Ann and Alfred Goldstein Health, Fitness and Recreation Center, will be moderated by actress and singer Vanessa Williams. Tickets for the program are $40 and $20 for students with valid ID.

The book, published by Simon & Schuster, looks at the lives of women in history who have made a difference, ranging from social activists and political figures to writers and Olympians. Among those highlighted in the book are Eleanor Roosevelt, Amelia Earhart, Harriet Tubman and Billie Jean King. But one of the favorites is trailblazing Representative and Senator from Maine, Margaret Chase Smith, who denounced Sen. Joe McCarthy and became the first woman to seek a major party's presidential nomination.

Read the Westchester Magazine article.

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