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Pace University in Pleasantville earns a honey of a designation

08/17/2020

Westfair Online featured Pace University in "Pace University in Pleasantville earns a honey of a designation"

Pace University has announced that its Pleasantville campus is now a certified affiliate of the Bee Campus USA program.

The program, which is conducted by the Xerces Society of Invertebrate Conservation, is designed to increase public awareness of the role that pollinators in the ecosystem – more than 150 domestic food crops depend on pollinators for their sustainability.

In the new semester, Pace create educational signage about pollinators and plans to host several pollinator-focused events. Pace students will also produce a documentary called “Bee Aware” that highlights the role bees play in the pollination process.

“Becoming a Bee Campus is important to Pace as it shows our commitment to creating a sustainable campus that will function both as healthy ecosystem for native plants and animals and as a living laboratory for students,” said Dyson College of Arts and Sciences Associate Professor Michael J. Rubbo.

“We plan on creating pollinator gardens where pollinators – bees, butterflies, beetles – can find sources of food and where students can study pollinators and develop solutions for their conservation.”

The Bee Campus USA program incorporates more than 90 locations across the country.

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Westfair Online featured Pace University in "Rockland Community College and Pace University in dual admission pact"

08/04/2020

Westfair Online featured Pace University in "Rockland Community College and Pace University in dual admission pact"

Rockland Community College (RCC) and Pace University have signed a dual admission agreement that will enable associate degree graduates from RCC to matriculate into Pace at a junior level.

Students from RCC must have a minimum grade point average of 2.5 and either an Associate of Arts, Associate of Science or Associate of Applied Science degree in order to transfer to Pace. and a minimum grade point average of 2.5 will be guaranteed acceptance to Pace University. Students graduating from RCC will have their lower level general education/core requirements waived if they transfer to Pace.

As part of the agreement, Pace will offer scholarships of up to $25,000 to eligible RCC transfer students who graduate with a GPA of 3.2 or higher to study at either the Pleasantville or Manhattan campuses.

“We are thrilled to join with Rockland Community College, our neighbor across the Hudson, in this important and forward-looking agreement,” Pace President Marvin Krislov said. “This partnership will allow us to help RCC students achieve their dreams, and we are eager and excited to continue helping provide all our students opportunities to succeed in the ever-changing global economy.”

RCC President Michael A. Baston said, “With this agreement, students will have the opportunity to go from one of the top community colleges in the state of New York to one of the state’s top four-year institutions. This is one example of the meaningful academic partnerships that RCC is building in our region which will allow our students to move on to the next phase of their educational journeys so that they can prosper in meaningful careers.”

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Westfair Online featured Elisabeth Haub School of Law Professor Elissa Germaine in "Pace law professor Elissa Germaine named to SEC committee"

05/20/2020

Westfair Online featured Elisabeth Haub School of Law Professor Elissa Germaine in "Pace law professor Elissa Germaine named to SEC committee"

When the Securities and Exchange Commission’s Investor Advisory Committee meets May 21, one of its new members will be a professor from Pace University’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law.

Elissa Germaine, who is an authority on securities law, was among those welcomed to the committee in a May 15 announcement by SEC Chairman Jay Clayton. “I welcome and look forward to working with this accomplished and diverse group of new committee members,” Clayton said.

The other new members in addition to Germaine are: Cien Asoera of Edward Jones; Theodore Daniels of the Society for Financial Education and Professional Development; Lori Lucas of the Employee Benefit Research Institute; Christopher Mirabile of Angel Capital Association; and Salyam Khanna of the NYU School of Law who will join the committee in July.

The committee was established under the Dodd-Frank Act to advise the SEC on areas such as regulation of securities products, trading strategies, fee structures, disclosure effectiveness, and initiatives to protect investors.

Germaine is executive director of Haub Law’s John Jay Legal Services and director of its Investor Rights Clinic.

“I look forward to working with the other members of the Investor Advisory Committee to help the SEC protect investors and promote confidence in the U.S. securities markets,” said Germaine.

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Westfair Online featured Veterans Director Peter Riley in "Peter Riley: Congress passes legislation allowing vets on GI Bill to get full benefits"

03/27/2020

Westfair Online featured Veterans Director Peter Riley in "Peter Riley: Congress passes legislation allowing vets on GI Bill to get full benefits"

The job of educating students amid the coronavirus pandemic has become increasingly complicated for higher education as classes move online and social distancing drastically changes campus life for the foreseeable future.

While so many students are being adversely impacted and must be taken care of, it’s especially important that our student veterans don’t fall through the cracks.

Steven Garcia, a U.S. Marine veteran attending Pace University in Pleasantville, was worried that the monthly housing allowance he receives under the GI Bill could have been significantly reduced now that students can no longer attend classes in person.

A senior majoring in accounting, Garcia served from 2010 to 2014 and was stationed in Japan, Afghanistan and Camp Lejeune in North Carolina. He was one of thousands of veterans who feared that if Congress and the president did not act quickly, they could lose a substantial amount of housing allowance benefits under the GI Bill.

That won’t happen as Congress has passed a bill and the President signed it. It’s precisely the type of quick mobilization that is required during these unprecedented times.

Here’s some backstory.

In New York, Gov. Andrew Cuomo declared a state of emergency. Responding to an environment that is changing daily, if not hourly, and for the safety and security of students, staff and faculty, Pace University – like colleges and universities across the country – made the decision to move all classes to an online/interactive format.

The switch to online classes, however, put in jeopardy GI Bill funding that many of our veterans depend upon. As a result, many Pace student veterans could have lost more than $2,000 a month in benefits due to circumstances beyond their control. That sum would have been reduced because of the way the Veteran’s Administration approves a school’s program. There are effectively three options for a program to be approved for VA education benefits: distance; hybrid; and in-residence education.

“Living in Westchester is very expensive,’’ said Garcia, 28, who lives in Cortlandt Manor with his mother. “Without this assistance half of veterans would not be able to pay car payments, mortgages and bills.”

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Westfair Online featured the Elisabeth Haub School of dean Law Horace E. Anderson Jr. in "Horace E. Anderson Jr. named dean of law school at Pace University"

12/18/2019

Westfair Online featured the Elisabeth Haub School of dean Law Horace E. Anderson Jr. in "Horace E. Anderson Jr. named dean of law school at Pace University"

Horace E. Anderson Jr. is no longer the interim dean of the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University; today he is the dean.

College President Marvin Krislov lauded Anderson, saying, “His vision for Haub Law has brought great successes during his time as interim dean, including our new U.S. News ranking as the No. 1 environmental law program in the country. I know the faculty, staff, and students join me in congratulating him on this well-deserved new role.”

Under his leadership as interim dean, the law school has been thriving, with increased enrollment and application numbers and new programs, such as the expansion of its part-time juris doctorate program to include evening and weekend classes, Pace University said in a statement.

“There is no better job than inspiring the future lawyers and leaders of tomorrow, and it all goes back to Pace’s mission of Opportunitas,” said Anderson, who becomes the ninth dean of the law school. “My parents immigrated to this country from Jamaica 50 years ago. I was the first person in my family born in the United States and the first to attend law school. Thankfully, I had role models and mentors who inspired and supported me. Every day I am honored to educate and guide our law students. A Haub Law degree transforms lives and families and prepares our students to make change in the world.’’

Anderson serves as the faculty adviser to the Black Law Student Association. During his time as dean and associate dean, the college said in a statement, Anderson “has also focused on students’ professional development and emotional health, emphasizing the importance of their cultivating a professional identity and learning to manage stress as they prepare to enter the legal profession.”

Anderson joined the faculty of the law school in 2004. He served as the school’s academic dean from 2011 until his appointment last year as interim dean.

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Westfair Online featured provost Vanya Quinones piece "Keeping Pace: Don't forget higher education's economic contributions"

12/10/2019

Westfair Online featured provost Vanya Quinones piece "Keeping Pace: Don't forget higher education's economic contributions"

Institutions of higher education continue to be economic drivers, not just in Westchester County, but across New York state.

Private not-for-profit colleges and universities in New York accounted for $88.8 billion in economic activity with approximately $2.2 billion spent on construction, buildings and infrastructure, according to a 2018 report from the Commission on Independent Colleges and Universities (CICU) in New York.

The CICU found that 25 college and university campuses in the Hudson Valley generated $5.2 billion in economic activity, supporting more than 26,000 jobs.

Pace University plays an important economic role in this region. A report released by Pace showed that its two Westchester campuses, one in Pleasantville and the Elisabeth Haub School of Law in White Plains, contributed nearly $360 million to the regional economy and were responsible for more than 1,500 jobs in 2017, the latest year for which data was available.

If you take a ride along Bedford Road in Pleasantville, it might not be apparent that in recent years Pace University has undergone a transformation on its 200-acre campus.

Pace has invested hundreds of millions of dollars in campus infrastructure, building a new student center, residence halls and athletic fields along with other amenities to enhance the student experience.

For every dollar an institution like Pace, a business or a nonprofit spends on goods and services, more are circulated throughout the economy, creating income and opportunities for construction workers, architects, engineers, food vendors and any number of businesses large and small.

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