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"National Geographic" featured Karl R. Rábago, the director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center at the Pace Law School in " 3 tests the Green New Deal must pass to work"

02/15/2019 News Release Image

"National Geographic" featured Karl R. Rábago, the director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center at the Pace Law School in " 3 tests the Green New Deal must pass to work"

...“If the goal was to change the conversation and you believe changing the conversation changes actions, it’s already a giant check mark in the win column,” said Karl R. Rábago, the director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center at the Pace Law School in New York. He’s a useful guide, having been in the trenches for several decades on climate and clean-electricity policy, with much of that time spent in Texas—a state that is a giant oil, gas, and chemicals producer as well as the nation’s biggest producer of wind-generated electricity.

Of course, actions on the ground to reboot America’s energy system—built over more than a century around cheap fossil fuels—require cash, technology, rules and regulations. And that’s where my third step comes in.

Jacobson and Karl Rábago at the Pace Energy and Climate Center both pointed to an emerging model, called Community Choice Aggregation, through which clusters of towns can, in essence, become their own utility, buying all-renewable electricity from various sources through the grid.

More than half a dozen states, including New York, now allow this, said Jacobson. “This means you don’t have to put solar on your roof,” he said. “You can buy 100-percent renewables at pretty much the same cost. They’ve sprung up all over the place.”

Indeed, one of them, Renewable Highlands, is in my part of the Hudson Valley. A tweet by Jacobson led me to it, via a story about Marbletown, a community of 5,500 in the Catskills, which just joined.

Read the full article.