Our Faculty

Tom Liam Lynch

Associate Professor

School of Education

Location

Education


EdD , Columbia University, Teachers College , New York, NY , 2011
English Education

MA , Columbia University, Teachers College , 2003
Teaching of English

BA , Fordham University , New York, NY , 2002
Philosophy and English

Awards and Honors

  • National Council of the Teachers of English, 2007 - Paul & Kate Farmer Award for outstanding article in English Journal
  • Teachers College, Columbia University, 2007 - Walter Sindlinger Writing Award Winner
  • National Endowment for the Humanities, 2006 - National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow, “Paradise Lost and the Contemporary Reader”
  • New Visions, 2005 - New Visions Fellow
  • Fordham University, 2002 - Philosophy departmental honors

Publications


Lynch, T. (Un)Just lists: How to understand and communicate the problems of data-driven education. Managing Educational Technology: School Partnerships & Technology Integration.

Lynch, T. & Gerber, H. An ontological imperative in researching of digital phenomena. International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches.

Lynch, T. Buzz over scale: An autoethnographic study of “personalization” in a large urban online professional development program. Work in Progress.

Musti-Rao, S. & Lynch, T. Culturally responsive literacy instruction for students with special needs: Implications for best practice. S. Kim (Eds.), ESL education: Current issues and research-based teaching practices. .

Mayorga, E. & Lynch, T. Feeding souls: A critical analysis of how accountability data structures the life out of children, community, and cultures. Work in Progress.

Behizadeh, N. & Lynch, T. (2017). Righting technology: Theoretical misalignment and technological underperformance of large-scale writing assessment. Working Research.

Lynch, T. Telltale languages resound: A narrative inquiry into using software to teach literature. Work in Progress.

Musti, S. The opportunity gap app: Why addressing technological inequity is essential to supporting learning and social inclusion. Work in Progress.

Lynch, T. & Ardito, G. “It makes no sense, but at least I got it up and running.” A critical software analysis of teachers' reflection journals while learning to program in R. Work in Progress.

Lynch, T. (2016). ). Saving computer science education from itself. English Journal. English Journal. (Issue 105(6)) , pages 101-103.

Lynch, T. (2016). As blankness falls: How data shape the relationships between students, teachers, and the public. English Journal. (Issue 105(3)) , pages 98-100.

Lynch, T. (2016). Below the screen: Why multiliteracies research needs to embrace software. English Journal. (Issue 106(3)) , pages 92-94.

Gerber, H. & Lynch, T. (2016). Into the meta: Research methods for moving beyond social media surfacing. Academy of Legal Studies.

Lynch, T. (2016). Letters to the machine: Why computer programming belongs in the English classroom. English Journal. (Issue 105(5)) , pages 95-97.

Lynch, T. (2016). Pedagogy's patents: Opening the door on technology's history in our classrooms. English Journal. (Issue 106(2)) , pages 105-106.

Lynch, T. (2016). Readers of ones and zeros: A case for K-12 digital humanities education. English Journal. (Issue 105(4)) , pages 111-113.

Lynch, T. (2016). Woodless and wired: How digital learning scars the earth and what to do. English Journal. (Issue 106(1)) , pages 73-75.

Lynch, T. (2015). ). Mustard seeds and information feeds: A short history of students as data. English Journal. (Issue 105(1)) , pages 96-98.

Lynch, T. (2015). Counting characters: Quantitative approaches to literary study. English Journal. (Issue 104(6)) , pages 71-74.

Lynch, T. (2015). Feeling Walt Whitman: Introducing new literatures and the use of data visualization to interpret poetry. English Journal. (Issue 104(4)) , pages 100-102.

Lynch, T. (2015). Holy interfaces and the sanctity of software: A critical software analysis of rubrics as vehicles of reform. M. Tenam-Zemach & J. Flynn (Eds.), A rubric nation: A reader on the utility and impact of rubrics in education. Charlotte, North Carolina: Information Age Publishing. , pages 125-141.

Lynch, T. (2015). Inquiry in an age of query. English Journal. (Issue 105(2)) , pages 126-128.

Lynch, T. (2015). Reassessing how we “see” students: The blessing and blight of rubrics (and software) in education. English Journal. (Issue 104(3)) , pages 88-90.

Lynch, T. (2015). Software's smile: A critical software analysis of an educational technology specialist program. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education. (Issue 15(4)) , pages 600-616.

Lynch, T. (2015). Spreadsheets and sinners: How and why English teachers can claim their rightful place in STEM education. English Journal . (Issue 104(5)) , pages 98-101.

Lynch, T. (2015). The hidden role of software in educational research: Policy to practice. New York: Routledge.

Musti-Rao, S. & Lynch, T. (2015). Training for fluency and generalization of math facts using technology. Intervention in School and Clinic. (Issue 51(2)) , pages 112-117.

Lynch, T. (2015). Where the machine stops: Software as reader and the rise of new literatures. Research in the Teaching of English. (Issue 49(3)) , pages 297-304.

PRESENTATIONS


Lynch, T. (2017, April). American Educational Research Association Annual Conference. Literacies unseen: Why the sub-screenic world of computer code, data, and algorithms demands literacy researchers' attention. American Educational Research Association, San Antonio, Texas

Lynch, T. & Gerber, H. (2017, March). Mixed Methods International Research Association Annual Conference. New research methods for new times: Mixing social media analytics with qualitative methods. Montego Bay, Jamaica

Lynch, T., Weinraub, M., Kamdar, V. & Frumin, K. (2017, March). SXSWedu. Wired for job-embedded online learning. Austin, Texas

Lynch, T. (2017, March). Undergraduate Community Meeting. . Moby data: Using computer science to study literature.. Pace University. , New York, New York.

Lynch, T. & Behizadeh, N. (2016, November). International Conference on Urban Education. Reforming high-stakes, large-scale assessment practices though a policy of negotiated control.. San Juan, Puerto Rico

Lynch, T. (2016, November). National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention. How teachers learn to code: What the teaching of coding can learn from the teaching of writing. Presenter. In Advocating for New Literacies and Technology in Classrooms and Communities. Atlanta, Georgia

Lynch, T. (2016, April). American Educational Research Association Annual Conference. Click to submit: The problems of “technology” in educational research and a case for critical software studies. Washington, D.C.

Lynch, T. (2016, February). Best Practices Conference. 3X3s: A blended model for giving & getting efficient feedback. Pace University. , New York, New York.

Lynch, T. (2016, February). Collaborative Inquiry for Teaching and Learning Network Day. Teacher Leader Quality Partnership Grant. . Seeing red: Hi- and low-tech methods for giving better feedback to student writing. Pace University, Pleasantville, New York

Lynch, T. (2016, February). Pace Path 4PD Lecture Series. . We don't know what our writing does: Why we should teach and learn about languages, not technology.. Pace University, New York, New York.

Lynch, T. (2015, November). National Council of Teachers of English Annual Convention. Introducing new literatures: Quantitative analysis and data visualization in the teaching of literature. Minneapolis, Minnesota

Lynch, T. (2015, October). Code Acts in Education Conference. . Dis/embodied language/s: A critical software analysis of U.S. education reform.. University of Bristol., Bristol, United Kingdom.

Lynch, T. (2015, August). Global Capacities Summer Institute, Center for the Professional Education of Teachers. What distance makes us see: A critical software analysis of current large-scale assessment practices in the United States.. Columbia University, Teachers College., New York, New York.

Lynch, T. & Behizadeh, N. (2015, July). Conference on English Education Biennial Conference. Befriending the machine: The historical and future impact of technology on large-scale writing assessment in Re-thinking high stakes assessment in writing and teacher education. New York, New York.

Lynch, T. (2015, July). Conference on English Education Biennial Conference. Using data visualization to teach (the teaching of) content-area literacy in Reaching beyond traditional methods: New literacies and meaningful technology use in teacher education. New York, New York

Lynch, T. (2015, April). American Educational Research Association Annual Convention. Righting technology: Theoretical misalignment and technological underperformance of large-scale writing assessment. Chicago, Illinois

Lynch, T. (2015, April). American Educational Research Association Annual Convention. The sanctity of software in A rubric nation: Critical inquiries into the of rubrics on education. Chicago, Illinois

Grants, Sponsored Research and Contracts

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS

  • Commission on New Literacies, Technology, and Teacher Education [Member]
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