main navigation
my pace

Lienhard School of Nursing | PACE UNIVERSITY

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Haitian Times" featured Lienhard School of nursing's Carol Roye in "Precision Medicine and the Haitian-American Community"

07/29/2019

"Haitian Times" featured Lienhard School of nursing's Carol Roye in "Precision Medicine and the Haitian-American Community"

Precision medicine is on its way to becoming the medical treatment of the future, but people of color may get left out of it completely to the detriment of their health.

To rectify this, the Maranatha French Church of SDA, a prominent Haitian-American church in St. Albans, held a presentation by All of Us, a research group that wants to close the gap in how people of color are aided by the medical community.

The idea behind precision medicine is to come up with a drug protocol that works with an individual of a particular background and environment as opposed to using current medicine that only uses research from white males over 60, according to Carol Roye, an Associate Dean for Scholarship at Pace University. By getting the biological makeup of people from varying ethnic backgrounds, genders and settings medicine could be better personalized for distinct groups or individuals.

“You might find that certain medications for diabetes may be very helpful to this population and some of them might not be,” according to Roye. “They would have no way of knowing that unless they had this database and tried the different medications on people of Haitian descent.”

Conducting the study are nurses from The American Association of Colleges of Nursing in conjunction with Pace University’s Lienhard School of Nursing in Manhattan with a $20,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health, and their goal is to get one million samples from different populations.

“I was talking yesterday to a woman from Haiti who was there and every night she was taking Advil for eight days when she wasn’t feeling well,” said Roye on July 13. “When she came back [to New York] and her doctor took her blood test, he told her she had kidney failure. Her doctor told her to stop taking the Advil and her condition started to reverse. She wasn’t even taking too much. If we finish this study, something like that could be prevented.”

Helping to spread the word at the church was Jean Chris Romulus, the executive director of Heal Haiti, a non-profit that encourages young adults to get into healthcare to help save lives.

Romulus learned about the research being done at Pace from Heal Haiti founder Gretha Fievre, an educator at Pace and prominent leader at her church.

“Pace wanted an organization to include African-American people and it was easy for them to see my group always working to help the Haitian community and to see Gretha as a teacher at the institution to help do the outreach,” said Romulus. “We did a media blast and reached about 1,200 people and offered that service to the American Association of Colleges.”

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Psychiatry Advisor" featured Pace New York's Counseling Psychologist Faedra R. Dagirmanjian in "Sensible Strategies to Overcome Barriers to Depression Treatment"

06/20/2019

"Psychiatry Advisor" featured Pace New York's Counseling Psychologist Faedra R. Dagirmanjian in "Sensible Strategies to Overcome Barriers to Depression Treatment"

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is often stigmatized, so it is not surprising that the disease goes undiagnosed and undertreated in certain populations. Ethnic and racial minorities, as well as young people, may be challenged by their own attitudes toward seeking care for MDD. MDD is a major health burden globally — with 5% to 7% of the population reporting such symptoms annually — clinicians and researchers are seeking ways to reduce the burden of illness and provide access to treatment.

While MDD is more pervasive in the white population, blacks are more likely to experience long-term, chronic, and debilitating depression. As research is underway to better understand the cumulative effect of social oppression in ethnic and racial groups, risk factors known to contribute to poor mental health include low income, socioeconomic positioning, and unemployment.

To help clinicians make more appropriate treatment choices, the Patient-Centered Culturally Sensitive Health Care is an assessment tool that enables them to see health disparities and how they can provide more individualized care. Patients whose clinicians have used the tool reported higher satisfaction with their treatment.

Knowing that certain patients are less likely to seek help for depression may also alert clinicians to intervene sooner. Overall, 39% of black women and 30% of black men vs 51% of men who are not of African descent were likely to seek treatment.

A study of working-class men (N=12; mean age, 40.42 years) found that they have difficulty acknowledging depression and are consequently reluctant to seek treatment, due to the social stigma. The qualitative study conducted by psychologists James R. Mahalik, PhD, from Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, and Faedra R. Dagirmanjian, PhD, from Pace University, New York City, conducted in-depth interviews with men who worked in mostly male-dominated manual labor.

As to why the men did not seek help for depression or sadness, the main themes focused on weakness and loss of masculinity for doing so. Some examples of what provided  relief for the men included speaking with women about their problems and experiencing trust during discussions.

Read the full article. 

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Women in Higher Education" featured Dr. Harriet Feldman of the College of Health Professions, Pace University in "Nursing Educator Builds Future Generations"

04/10/2018

"Women in Higher Education" featured Dr. Harriet Feldman of the College of Health Professions, Pace University in "Nursing Educator Builds Future Generations"

As the United States faces a nursing crisis, Dr. Harriet Feldman of the College of Health Professions/Lienhard School of Nursing Pace University NY works to educate not only nurses who will fill crucial roles in contemporary health care, but also develop nursing educators who will keep the field thriving. Throughout her years at Pace, Feldman, who is dean and professor of the nursing school, has sought innovative ways to grow the nursing profession as well as increase diversity.

Early Career
Like many women in the mid-1960s, after high school Feldman enrolled in a nursing program. Shortly before graduating the diploma program, a faculty member suggested she continue her education and pursue a bachelor’s degree. Wanting to get to work, she took a job, but also decided to take one course. That course made her want to continue her education.

As Feldman progressed, leaders in nursing kept encouraging her to push further—earning bachelor’s and master’s degrees. She didn’t see herself as a future leader, but she enjoyed the education and found a passion for nursing. Toward the end of her master’s program, she was asked if she wanted to teach, so she did a bit of it while finishing her master’s and then became a full-time instructor.

After getting married and starting a family, she went back into clinical practice, but part of her role was teaching hospital staff. Feldman began to see the bigger picture—not only was she having an impact on the patients with whom she directly interacted, but, through training others, she was having an impact on many other patients as well. She made the decision to commit to a career in nursing education—earning a doctorate and taking on greater and greater leadership roles.

Changes in Nursing
Since the late 1960s, Feldman has been a proponent of moving nursing forward and giving the profession greater prestige. The first graduate course she taught was in change theory.

“I had taken a similar course myself, but teaching it was such a different kind of experience—preparing for it, working closely with the students,” says Feldman. “That set the stage for my interest in making change for the greater good. My path early in my career and even now is because I’m a risk-taker. I like the idea of making an impact and doing something to help this profession.”

In 1993, Feldman became dean of Pace’s Lienhard School of Nursing, and with that, her influence solidified. Thanks to forward-thinking educators, nursing has evolved, starting with more stringent educational requirements to become a registered nurse. Today’s nursing requires more critical thinking and evidence-based practice.

“The thing that’s changed the whole landscape is the technology that we use in health care,” Feldman says. “I don’t mean just the electronic records, but the equipment. The changes help inform people so they can make better decisions.”

Pace was an early adopter of technology in the curriculum,\ such as blackboard sites. This enabled the development of hybrid (mixing online and onsite) graduate courses as well as online courses. Feldman keeps informed on technological advances and tries to introduce them at Pace as soon as possible.

Feldman says faculty members have been committed to making Pace’s nursing program stellar. Data is gathered and analyzed on student success. The professors have been open to revising curricula and approaches so as to maximize student outcomes—the goal being 100 percent success on licensure exams. It’s also important to ensure the faculty have all the tools they need.

“I send them to conferences regularly for development in terms of teaching strategies and content,” says Feldman. “People have said how welcome they feel here and how the culture is so supportive.”

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Westchester County Business Journal" featured Pace College of Health Professions Health Center in "Pace opens expanded university health care center in Pleasantville"

04/09/2018

"Westchester County Business Journal" featured Pace College of Health Professions Health Center in "Pace opens expanded university health care center in Pleasantville"

Pace University made history in 1978 when it opened the first-ever nurse-managed medical facility on the campus of a U.S. college. Forty years later, the school celebrated the anniversary and renewed its commitment to the program with the completion of a new and expanded health care center.

Pace held a ribbon cutting Thursday, April 5 for the new 2,000-square-foot health center space inside the Paton House, which also hosts Pace’s career services office. The health care center features four patient exam rooms, a procedure room and lab. It also has a larger reception area than the previous location, which was in the college’s Goldstein Fitness Center.

About 1,700 patients – a mix that is mostly students but also includes staff, faculty and even alumni – are treated by the school’s health center annually. With that number growing, Pace College of Health Professions Dean Harriet R. Feldman, said it was time to expand.

“We needed a lot more space because we were seeing a lot more students,” said Harriet R. Feldman, dean of Pace’s College of Health Professions. “This space is about three times the size of what we had before, and we’re already starting to see more students show up at the door.”

The previous location had also become a bit too noisy for a health care facility, Feldman said. Renovations to the fitness center last year placed a weight room directly above the health center, requiring staff to work through barbell-induced thuds.

The new location puts the health center near three residence halls. “It’s easy access for the students,” Feldman said. “They don’t have to go down the hall and through the gym. They’re right next door.”

The health center is staffed by three nurses, including two nurse practitioners whom receive assistance primarily from student employees. The staff can treat most common illnesses, prescribe or refill medications, order lab and radiology tests and refer students to specialty care.

“It’s pretty much all of your primary care services,” Feldman said.

The health center also acts as a clinical setting for nursing students in the Pace College of Health Professions.

Feldman said students typically have insurance through family plans or through the school. The university opened the health center as part of its celebration of 40 years on campus. Pace was the first in the country to use nurse practitioners to operate its health center, which Feldman said has become a model for the rest of the country.

Pace also plans to open a new health center on its New York City campus later this year.

Read the article.

Read the newspaper article (PDF).

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

"Daily Voice" featured Dean Harriet Feldman and Associate Director of University Health Care Karen Martin in "Pace Opens New Health Care Center On Pleasantville Campus"

04/09/2018

"Daily Voice" featured Dean Harriet Feldman and Associate Director of University Health Care Karen Martin in "Pace Opens New Health Care Center On Pleasantville Campus"

From left to right, Pace Dean Harriet R. Feldman, Karen Martin of UHC, Ellen Rich, Jamie Newland, Andréa Sonenberg. (back row) Lillie M. Shortridge-Baggett, UHC Director Audrey Hoover, and Marykate Aquisto of state Sen. Terrence Murphy's office.

Pace University opened a new and enlarged health care center on its Pleasantville campus on Thursday, April 5, celebrating the 40th anniversary of its University Health Center.

The first nurse-managed academic health care service on a university campus in the United States, UHC opened its doors at Pace in 1977. A novel concept at the time, the use of nurse practitioners is now common practice in primary care.

UHC offers a wide range of primary health care services and its leading-edge care continues to be a model, nationally and internationally.

The new Pace location, which moved from the Goldstein Fitness Center to the Paton House, is approximately 2,000-square-feet with four patient exam rooms, a procedure room, larger reception area and a lab.

More than 1,700 patients, including students, staff, faculty, alumni, and their families are treated there each year.

UHC’s nurse practitioners can treat most common illnesses, prescribe or refill medications, order lab and radiology tests, and refer to speciality care. Considered in network to multiple health care insurance providers, UHC also acts as a clinical setting for nursing students and preceptorships.

“This new facility will allow us to see more patients in a more comfortable setting and we have already begun to see an increase in patients,” said Harriet R. Feldman, dean of Pace’s College of Health Professions. “We are carrying on a great tradition of patient-centered healthcare in a new, more modern facility that will better serve our campus community.’’

In honor of the milestone, Dean Feldman and Karen Martin, associate director of University Health Care, accepted a proclamation from the office of state Sen. Terrence Murphy.

The day’s activities began with a conference “University Health Care at 40: Emerging Trends in Primary Care,” which examined the evolution of the role of nurse practitioner and successful trends in health care. The conference included a panel of nurse practitioners who helped build and shape UHC throughout the years.

Read the article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed

News Item

Dean Harriet Feldman, College of Health Professions and Lienhard School of Nursing, featured in "Diverse Issues in Higher Education" on "Meeting Nursing Demands Through Diversity"

02/26/2018

Dean Harriet Feldman, College of Health Professions and Lienhard School of Nursing Dean featured in "Diverse Issues in Higher Education" on "Meeting Nursing Demands Through Diversity"

Diverse Issues in Higher Education: "Meeting Nursing Demand Through Diversity"

by Lois Elfman

From "Diverse Issues:"

...At the College of Health Professions and Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University, two home grown faculty members have already taken their spots. They are teaching undergraduate students and are working on developing their research. Pace’s “grow our own” specifically targets minority students.

“We recently started a Ph.D. program and we have about 10 students in that program,” says Dr. Harriet Feldman, a professor and dean of Pace’s nursing school. “Two of them are [currently] clinical faculty (teaching clinical practice and working with students in the field). Assuming everything goes well, they will reach their Ph.D.s in a few years and be able to enter tenure-track roles, whether here or somewhere else.”

Ross says that, when she was an undergraduate nursing student at Coppin State University, the professors created a love for the profession and a desire to continue the school’s legacy.

“When professors create that desire in the students to give back to the university and to their community, that’s when those students want to come back and teach,” says Ross, who also strongly voices the opinion that, if faculty positions paid salaries commensurate with clinical work, more people in the nursing workforce would pursue teaching.

To help build motivation among Pace students, education courses are in the graduate curriculum. At present, approximately half the students in the school of nursing are underrepresented minorities.

“We’re planting seeds,” says Feldman, who is also launching a distinguished lecture series to provide exposure for the nursing program to diverse individuals. “We’ve also built an environment where people want to teach. We have terrific outcomes in terms of our students finding employment and passing licensure and certification exams.”

Read the full article.

News & Events

Sort/Filter

Filter Newsfeed