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"Taipei Times" featured Dyson Professor Joseph Tse-Hei Lee's piece "Cities on coasts must learn from Mangkhut"

09/21/2018

"Taipei Times" featured Dyson Professor Joseph Tse-Hei Lee's piece "Cities on coasts must learn from Mangkhut"

A vast area in coastal China was severely lashed by Super Typhoon Mangkhut over the weekend. A deadly storm that caused considerable disruptions and dozens of deaths in the Philippines, it brought drenching rains, powerful winds and massive waves when it made landfall in Hong Kong, Macau and China’s Pearl River Delta.

The frequency and intensity of tropical storms exposes the vulnerability of major cities in their path. Storm surges flooded low-lying neighborhoods in Hong Kong and Macau. Heavy rain triggered landslides, and fallen trees and power lines shut down highways and bridges.

Neighborhoods in Hong Kong and Macau looked like disaster zones after Mangkhut passed. Debris and broken windows were piled up in the streets. Residents lost electricity and were cut off from the outside world.

It was moving to see that firefighters and police officers worked together to rescue stricken residents.

Everyone has been grateful for the outpouring of compassion and support, but it is important for metropolises like Hong Kong, Macau, Shenzhen and Guangzhou to reflect on three lessons in disaster management in preparation for the future.

First, global climate change is making extreme weather the new normal everywhere. As the air warms up, the winds and downpours caused by typhoons become increasingly intense. A series of epic storms just brought everyone to their knees in the Philippines, and in North and South Carolina in the US.

Acknowledging this new climatic pattern, policymakers and real-estate developers along the Chinese coast should be more pragmatic in envisioning post-disaster redevelopment plans. Instead of compensating residents who lost homes and cars to Mangkhut, urban officials and developers should avoid building luxurious condominiums, skyscrapers and shopping malls in vulnerable flood zones.

Second, all municipal governments along the storm path must rethink the conventional framework of crisis management and initiate some institutional changes.

For decades, Macau has been flush with tax revenues from gambling. As the world’s wealthiest territory in terms of GDP per capita based on purchasing power parity (US$104,862 last year), its government’s massive budget surplus makes it the envy of any nation. Driven by a lax approach to governance, the ruling elites treat other residents like shareholders and give them generous cash handouts annually.

Hong Kong is more resilient to typhoons thanks to many decades of investment in underground drainage systems. Perhaps it is time for regional political and business leaders to use resources wisely, concentrating on sustainable infrastructure and weather-related disaster prevention.

Third, there was no outbreak of looting and crime in Hong Kong and Macau. Both territories remained calm and orderly. After the storm passed, volunteers came together to help victims.

Wherever self-mobilization took place in a disaster situation, it empowered local communities to take control of the problems. Regional authorities should welcome and encourage such compassionate and energetic efforts from civic society in a post-disaster recovery process.

One way is to formulate emergency evacuation plans and encourage everyone to be more self-reliant. Another is to divide emergency workers and medical professionals into small response teams with the tools and institutional support to deal with climate-related crises.

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Press Release: Six New York City Universities Work to Reduce Water Use

09/19/2018

Press Release: Six New York City Universities Work to Reduce Water Use

Participating Schools Will Join Hospitals, Restaurants, and Hotels in the New York City Water Challenge

In Addition to Fixture Retrofits, Universities Will Initiate Student Water Conservation Campaigns

New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) Commissioner Vincent Sapienza today announced the launch of the New York City Water Challenge to Universities. This is the fourth of New York City’s sector specific Challenges and builds off the success of previous Challenges to hotels, restaurants and hospitals. As part of the Challenge, the six participating universities will work to reduce their campus-wide average water consumption by 5 percent, which would be a savings of approximately 1.3 million gallons of water per month. DEP will host workshops to help the universities identify appropriate strategies for water conservation, including water auditing, upgrading domestic use water fixtures, and smart metering. In addition to fixture retrofits, the universities will also be initiating student water conservation campaigns. The challenge will last two years and conclude in August 2020. The participating universities are Fordham University, Long Island University: Brooklyn Campus, Pace University, St. John’s University, The New School, and Weill Cornell Medical. New York City is home to more university students than anywhere in the country. The lessons learned from the New York City Water Challenge to Universities will be utilized by DEP to develop a best practices guide for water management in higher education buildings.

“These six universities are helping DEP to conserve one of our city’s most precious resources, our world renowned drinking water supply, by targeting ways to reduce their campus’ water consumption and promoting water conservation among their faculty and students,” said DEP Commissioner Vincent Sapienza. “I thank these schools for participating in the New York City Water Challenge and for making a commitment to become more sustainable members of our community.”

“The human family is increasingly becoming aware of the limits of our planet, including its supply of fresh water,” said Joseph M. McShane, S.J., president of Fordham University. “We are called to be good stewards of our water supply (and all natural resources) not merely for the good of our fellow New Yorkers, nor the entire population of the globe, but for all living things. Fordham is proud to be a part of this effort.”

“Long Island University is proud to partner with Department of Environmental Protection as a participant in the New York City Water Challenge to Universities,” said LIU President Dr. Kimberly R. Cline. “We are actively exploring innovative ways to reduce water use at Long Island University and developing engaging awareness campaigns to educate our student body on the importance of water conservation.”

“Pace University is committed to sustainability and proud to be a participant in the New York City Water Challenge,” said Pace President Marvin Krislov. “From the world-renowned environmental law program at our Elisabeth Haub School of Law to the work we do in New York Harbor with the Billion Oyster Project, we’re educating future environmental leaders. We’re pleased to support the New York City Department of Environmental Protection as it develops best practices for water management.”

“The earth is our common home and water is a most precious resource,” said St. John’s University President Conrado “Bobby” Gempesaw. “At St. John’s, environmental awareness and sustainability is an interdisciplinary mission and we are proud to join in the New York City Water Challenge to Universities and work to reduce water use.”

“The New School has a strong commitment to sustainability, and we are proud to join with the DEP and universities, restaurants, and hospitals across New York City to reduce water use,” said New School President David Van Zandt. “With our formidable talents in design and the social sciences, we look forward to working with the DEP and members of our university community to conserve one the city’s most valued resources: our drinking water.”

“Weill Cornell Medicine is committed to sustainability and we are proud to support this vital environmental initiative,” said Dr. Augustine M.K. Choi, the Stephen and Suzanne Weiss Dean of Weill Cornell Medicine. “We look forward to working with our faculty, students and staff on innovative ways to reduce our water consumption, helping to ensure a safe and reliable water supply for future generations of doctors, patients and all New Yorkers.”

To see updates from these schools and their students as they save water during the Challenge, follow @nycwater and #nycwaterchallenge.

Encouraging water-usage reductions in universities is just one part of DEP’s efforts to conserve water as part of a $1.5 billion initiative to ensure clean, reliable, and safe drinking water for more than nine million New Yorkers for decades to come. DEP is working to reduce citywide water consumption by five percent prior to the approximately 6-month shutdown of the leaking Delaware Aqueduct, which conveys roughly half of the city’s drinking water, in October 2022. The $1 billion project will repair two areas of leakage within the 85-mile Delaware Aqueduct, the longest tunnel in the world. The primary leak will be eliminated through the construction of a 2.5-mile bypass tunnel, which will be drilled 600 feet below the Hudson River from Newburgh to Wappinger.

In preparation for the shutdown, DEP has partnered with private property owners including businesses, hotels, restaurants and hospitals, and has developed a combination of conservation programs, such as the Toilet Replacement Program, Leak Notification Program, and Water Reuse Grant Pilot Program, to ensure an uninterrupted supply of water. DEP’s Municipal Water Efficiency Program identifies opportunities to conserve water at City-owned properties and facilities. As part of this program, DEP has already completed a partnership with NYC Parks to install activation buttons on spray showers at 400 playgrounds around the City that are saving 1.1 million gallons of water a day. More than 40,000 bathroom fixtures in 400 public school buildings were also being updated which will conserve approximately 4 million gallons of water each school day. To learn more about New York City’s Water Demand Management Program, visit DEP’s interactive online map highlighting the completed demand management projects across the city and DEP’s 2018 Water Demand Management Plan.

As a result of multiple sustained water conservation programs, overall water use in the city has declined from over 1.5 billion gallons a day in 1980 to roughly 1 billion gallons a day at present, while the City’s population grew from just over 7.1 million to 8.6 million in the same period.

DEP manages New York City’s water supply, providing more than 1 billion gallons of water each day to more than 9 million residents, including 8.6 million in New York City. The water is delivered from a watershed that extends more than 125 miles from the city, comprising 19 reservoirs and three controlled lakes. Approximately 7,000 miles of water mains, tunnels and aqueducts bring water to homes and businesses throughout the five boroughs, and 7,500 miles of sewer lines and 96 pump stations take wastewater to 14 in-city treatment plants. DEP has nearly 6,000 employees, including almost 1,000 in the upstate watershed. In addition, DEP has a robust capital program, with a planned $19.4 billion in investments over the next 10 years that will create up to 3,000 construction-related jobs per year. For more information, visit nyc.gov/dep, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter.

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"CBS News" featured director of the Pace University Small Business Development Center Andrew Flamm in "Launching a new business: First key steps"

09/18/2018

"CBS News" featured director of the Pace University Small Business Development Center Andrew Flamm in "Launching a new business: First key steps"

...If you've been working on a side hustle that you're planning to turn into a business, those answers may be more readily available, said Andrew Flamm, director of the Pace University Small Business Development Center, which provides workshops and advisers to small-business owners and startups.

"The folks who are at an earlier stage -- whether they're doing a side hustle or maybe they're a graphic designer at night and baking cupcakes for the church group on weekends -- they have a proof of concept that's working, and they've kind of sampled with clients," Flamm told CBS MoneyWatch.

For those just starting out with their idea, Flamm said it may take more digging to tap into exactly who your customer is. "The simultaneous process might be being able to look at what your customers might be interested in, but also thinking about the different components of the business plan," Flamm said.

He added: "Who am I, what do I offer? Look at your target market and make sure it actually aligns with what [the product] is going to be."

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"City & State" featured President Marvin Krislov in "The Westchester Power 50; 11-50"

09/17/2018

"City & State" featured President Marvin Krislov in "The Westchester Power 50; 11-50"

The most influential people in the Hudson Valley.

In the era of President Donald Trump, the national political debate has grown increasingly divisive. Voters are shifting to the extremes, leaving fewer Americans in the middle. But there are places where independent-minded voters still play an important role – and in New York, one of those places is Westchester County.

The county’s history as a swing district – after two terms with Republican Rob Astorino as county executive, it went strongly for Democrat George Latimer last year – gives it outsized importance in state politics and policymaking. Politicians like Gov. Andrew Cuomo – who lives in Westchester when he’s not in Albany – must keep the county’s needs in mind on the campaign trail. It’s no surprise that state Sen. Andrea Stewart-Cousins, who is hoping to lead Senate Democrats back to the majority, hails from Westchester.

In this special issue of City & State, we take a closer look at the lesser-known – but no less influential – movers and shakers of Westchester County. Since we cover politicians on a day-to-day basis, we limited this list to those who are not strictly in government but instead influence it from the outside.

We partnered on this project with Suzanne Colucci, an award-winning television journalist based in Westchester. We reached out to insiders and experts to compile this list, ranking each person based on their accomplishments, their sway in political and policy matters, their economic clout, their philanthropic efforts, their ties to powerful politicians and the constituencies they represent. It’s worth noting that the people on it are predominantly white and male, which simply reflects our best attempt at identifying the power structure as it is. We sought to balance that by presenting an additional – and more diverse – list of younger figures on the rise. We’re pleased to present the Westchester Power 50.

30. Marvin Krislov, President, Pace University

Marvin Krislov took the reins at Pace University last year, becoming its eighth president. He is a dynamic force leading an institution with 13,000 students in New York City and Westchester. The former president of Oberlin College and former vice president and general counsel at the University of Michigan is also an accomplished attorney and legal scholar, having worked in the U.S. Labor Department during the Clinton administration. Krislov has long fought for college inclusiveness and student diversity.

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Press Release: Pace University Education Professor Receives National Technology Initiative Fellowship Award

09/13/2018

Press Release: Pace University Education Professor Receives National Technology Initiative Fellowship Award

Pace Professor Tom Lynch recognized for his innovation in embedding computer science into English classes

Pace University School of Education Associate Professor Tom Liam Lynch, Ed.D., was selected by the National Council of Teachers as the recipient of the National Technology Leadership Initiative Award.

The national honor highlights Lynch’s efforts to embed computer science in English Language Arts classrooms. “Mixed literary analyses” go beyond the average English lesson. Teachers challenge students to write literary essays that use traditional data from a text and include quotes, but also use quantitative data such as how many key words appear in a body of work. With computerization changing career trajectories of this generation, Lynch aims to equip students with a toolkit to flourish in today’s rapidly changing workplace and become the best possible innovators, creative thinkers, and problem solvers.

Pace University Provost Vanya Quiñones said Lynch exemplifies what makes Pace faculty so innovative. “We are very proud of Professor Tom Lynch,” said Quiñones. “His award demonstrates Pace faculty’s ongoing commitment to educating America’s next generation of ambitious doers and strivers. Professor Lynch and his colleagues are preparing Pace students for success by challenging the norms.”

Lynch says merging computer science and English will level the playing field. “If we are serious about computer science being taught to all children, not just in those schools who can afford to do so, we have to find ways to embed computer science into core content-areas,” said Lynch. “Computer science can deepen and expand subjects like English. When we do that, we ensure computer science is made equitably and sustainably available to all.”

The assignments were piloted in the spring at Pace High School as part of Lynch’s work as co-director of Babble Lab: A Center for Digital Humanities Pedagogy and Research. Assistant Professor Kelley Kreitz, Ph.D., of the Dyson College of Arts and Sciences at Pace, is co-director. The lab is funded by the Pace Fund.

Prior to Pace, Lynch was an English teacher and school district official for the New York City Department of Education. Lynch led the implementation of a $50 million online/blended learning program in over 100 schools called iLearnNYC. He also designed and guided the initial implementation of WeTeachNYC, a digital resource repository and learning environment for the city’s 80,000 teachers. Tom’s research sits at the intersection of software theory and English education. His book, “The Hidden Role of Software in Educational Research: Policy to Practice,” was released by Routledge in 2015. Lynch received his bachelor’s degree from Fordham University, his master’s and doctorate of Education from Columbia University in New York.

The award was issued by the tech division of the National Technology Literary Initiative, English Language Arts Teachers Educators (ELATE). Lynch will accept the award and present his work to his peers at an annual education conference in Las Vegas, Nevada in March of 2019.

About the National Council of Teachers of English

The National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) is devoted to improving the teaching and learning of English and the language arts at all levels of education. They promote the development of literacy, the use of language to construct personal and public worlds and to achieve full participation in society, through the learning and teaching of English. http://www2.ncte.org/

About the School of Education

For more than fifty years, Pace University’s School of Education has prepared students to not only meet the requirements for teaching certification, but to also be agents of change committed to student success and lifelong learning. Through small classes and early fieldwork experiences, School of Education graduates are ready to start making a difference in the world before they even graduate. School of Education students receive the tools they need to be successful educators from faculty who are nationally and internationally renowned for active engagement in progressive research activities. Our students begin observations the first semester of sophomore year, which is one year earlier than most schools, and we strive to provide courses in a variety of new specialty areas to improve engagement, especially for students with diverse learning styles and learning differences. https://www.pace.edu/school-of-education/

About Pace University
Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. A 2017 study by the Equality of Opportunity Project finds that Pace graduates are out-earning their parents and peers, bucking a nationwide trend for millennialswww.pace.edu.

 

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"Westchester County Business Journal" featured Pace University students Hansali Tavarez, Brandon Morales and Madison Olavarria in "Pace students awarded State Department scholarships"

09/13/2018

"Westchester County Business Journal" featured Pace University students Hansali Tavarez, Brandon Morales and Madison Olavarria in "Pace students awarded State Department scholarships"

Three Pace University students have been awarded Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarships from the U.S. State Department, which will enable them to study overseas. The program was initiated in 2001 and named after the late Rep. Benjamin A. Gilman of New York who was instrumental in creating it. Gilman retired from Congress in 2002 after having served for 30 years, which included serving as chairman of the House Foreign Relations Committee.

Sophomore Hansali Tavarez will study in Vietnam. She is taking political science at Pace Dyson College of Arts and Sciences. Senior Brandon Morales will study at Hong Kong Baptist University. He is a student of business management at Pace Lubin School of Business. Senior Madison Olavarria will be at Korea University in South Korea for the academic year 2018-2019. A double major, she is studying economics and computer science. 

Barry L. Stinson, Pace University’s assistant vice president of international programs and services, said, “The heart of the Gilman award is about diversity – in terms of the students who are going abroad as well as their destinations. Our Pace awardees exemplify both and we are so proud of their accomplishments.”

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"Playbill" featured Pace University's School of Performing Arts Amy Rogers Schwartzreich and Nedra McClyde in "13 Tips to Nail Your College Audition"

09/12/2018

"Playbill" featured Pace University's School of Performing Arts Amy Rogers Schwartzreich and Nedra McClyde in "13 Tips to Nail Your College Audition"

As illustrated by Playbill’s Schools of the Stars column and the annual Big 10, undergraduate programs at colleges and conservatories offering degrees in the performing arts have hit a boom—and with good reason. Just as it behooves a future accountant to be an accounting major, it makes sense for artists to study their craft, its history, practical techniques, and more before entering the world of professionals.

Performing arts programs include an addendum to that common app: the audition. Here Playbill consults six educators and coaches, who sit on the other side of the table during college auditions, offer their best advice for conquering the process to nail your call and find the right fit.
But all agree that this process is about showing who you are and revealing your potential, rather than your perfection.

Types of songs that work well and don't work well
"Songs that are immediately actable; songs that you connect to personally; songs that are in the 'sweet spot' of your voice; songs that make you feel powerful and grounded; songs that are written for people your age; songs that are open or exude joy; songs that can teach us about you in some way; songs that are about change or embarking on something new; songs that have an epiphany in them; songs about helping other people in some way.

"Songs that have repetitive lyrics and notes do not work well; songs about an experience that you cannot relate to or empathize with; songs that are a pity party; songs that are out of your range or vocal style; songs that don’t have a dramatic narrative; songs that require 'high comedy'; songs that have non words in them; an aria or songs from operetta (unless requested ); the newest song that no one has heard; songs that have a lisp or accent; songs that identify you as crazy; songs that tell me you are a star."
Amy Rogers Schwartzreich, director and founder of the B.F.A. Musical Theater Program at Pace University in New York City and author of forthcoming book The Ultimate Musical Theater College Audition Guide: Advice from the People Who Make the Decision (out February 1, 2019).

"Choose more material than you need. By the time auditions come around you should have at least four monologues and six songs. Keep in mind that you’re going to be traveling around the country to audition so make sure you have songs that you can sing even if you’re sick or have allergies. We call those pocket songs. You should be able to pull these out no matter how you’re feeling.

"Read the plays that you choose pieces from. Know the shows you’re choosing music from. Be prepared to discuss the composers, shows, or playwrights if asked. There’s nothing more revealing than asking a potential student about a show that they’re singing a piece from and they don’t know the show."
—Michael McElroy, associate chair/head of vocal performance undergraduate drama NYU Tisch School of the Arts, founder/musical director/arranger for Broadway Inspirational Voices, and Broadway performer.

"If you are not 100 percent certain you’ll hit that note, choose a different song. We love a wide range, but we also love when you hit the right notes. And choose material that is extremely personal that you can have a real connection to. Then find a teacher or a coach or a friend that can run through that material with you over and over to ensure that you’re being completely honest and open."
Nedra McClyde, full-time faculty member at Pace University's School of Performing Arts and former instructor at The New School of Drama and NYU's Playwrights Horizons Theater School, Broadway and television performer. 

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"Broadway World" featured Pace University's Vanessa J. Herman in "D.C. Area Theaters To Present THE THE BETSY DEVOS CONFIRMATION HEARING"

09/12/2018

"Broadway World" featured Pace University's Vanessa J. Herman in "D.C. Area Theaters To Present THE THE BETSY DEVOS CONFIRMATION HEARING"

As the school year begins across the country, Broadway Producers Fran Kirmser and Chris Burney team up with area D.C. theater organizations to present AMERICAN SCOREBOARD's back-to-school performance of The Betsy DeVos Confirmation Hearing for The Secretary of Education to take place at The Mead Center for American Theater at Arena Stage, 1101 Sixth Street SW, Washington, D.C. on September 17th, 2018 at 6pm. This will mark the first visit of Kirmser and Burney's American Scoreboard educational program to the D.C. area.

AMERICAN SCOREBOARD is an ongoing series that reflects the issues that face the current administration, President Trump and the American people today. Conceived and produced by two-time Tony Award winning Broadway Producer Fran Kirmser and created and produced by Tony Nominee and University Professor Christopher Burney, AMERICAN SCOREBOARD are readings of timely verbatim Senate hearing transcripts presented in the theater performed by stage and screen actors.

"Theater provides the perfect platform for American Scoreboard to present, as conceived, verbatim readings of US Senate hearings. The tech-free, respectful and intimate environment of the theater encourages audiences from both sides of the aisle to simply listen to the language of our government leaders," says producer Fran Kirmser.

Casting for the D.C. production will hail from a collaborative process with the education programs at Signature Theater, Imagination Theater and Studio Theater. The young actors being cast to play the US Senators will be announced shortly. Says producer Chris Burney, "Being able to work with students passionate about the political process shows the power of story to engage audience for social change and provides hope for the future."

AMERICAN SCOREBOARD's first readings were presented at HB Studio Players Theater on January 24, 2017. It highlighted the topic of corporate fraud from the hearing of Wells Fargo. The second reading, The Tom Price Confirmation Hearing, was presented on March 1st, 2017, and the third installment on The Investigation of Russian Interference in the 2016 Election with Clint Watts was presented on June 26th, 2017. Gun Violence was read via podcast appearance on January 16th, 2018. The Betsy DeVos Confirmation Hearing was originally co-produced with Pace University in the Fall of 2017 at the 700 seat Schimmel Center in New York, New York.

"Pace University was proud to partner with American Scoreboard for this series that brought education policy in this country into vivid life for our faculty, staff and students. The work being done by American Scoreboard is important and an innovative way to engage our students and the viewer in today's political process," said Vanessa J. Herman, Government & Community Relations, Pace University.

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"Backstage" featured Pace University's Performing Arts Grant Kretchik and JV Mercanti in "Why You Should Audition for Acting School"

09/12/2018

"Backstage" featured Pace University's Performing Arts Grant Kretchik and JV Mercanti in "Why You Should Audition for Acting School"

September means going back to school, and it might have you saying, “This time next year, will I be enrolled at an acting college?” To audition for a higher performance institution, you don’t need to have it all figured out. In fact, sometimes the audition process itself will be the exact clarity you need to decide whether to further your creative pursuits. But no matter what, you shouldn’t let the audition itself deter you from figuring it out. Below, industry and Backstage Experts answer everything you need to know about auditioning for acting school.

Auditions can tip the scales in the right direction.  
“The audition process can be revealing and a good opportunity not to quit, but to evaluate what you need to follow this path. You can love acting while finding other ways to keep it in your life. If you struggle to get into a program, explore other ways to satisfy your love for it. You can be an actor anywhere. Still, my favorite place to act is at the Ritz Company Playhouse in Hawley, Pennsylvania, because that’s where I got my start when I didn’t know as much and acted only because I love it. I still fantasize about going back there and acting for the pure joy. All this to say, I turn away talented hopefuls often and maybe even ‘the next Meryl.’ So only you will know if you should continue. Do not let any of us take your dreams away. Fight for what you love and go towards it. Remember, if there is doubt in your mind, it’s also really worth examining.” —Grant Ketchik, associate director of Pace University’s School of Performing Arts, head of its BFA acting program, and Backstage Expert

Nerves are one thing; underpreparedness is another.
“Many college programs will find a way to calm you down before your audition by offering a group warmup or talking to you and getting to know you before you start your audition material. They understand that being nervous is part of the process. If you’re nervous because you haven’t thoroughly prepared the audition material, chose it at the last minute, or didn’t read the play the monologues have come from, they will be less forgiving. The more prepared you are, the more you will be able to trust yourself, take a deep breath before you walk into the audition room, and keep your cool.” —Tom Morin, professional actor, NYC-based acting coach, and Backstage Expert

Hate monologues? You’re not alone.
“Monologues are horrible animals. We all hate doing them, we all hate looking for them, listening to them—but they’re a convenient way to get to know another person who wants to be an actor. We can see if you have talent, any sense of instincts, a creative imagination, if you’re able to access emotion freely—and I don’t mean a frenzy of emotion, but allowing yourself to come from a real place. Anything apart from that is distracting.” —Lucien Douglas, faculty member at University of Texas at Austin

Take the reins.
“Handle the business part yourself. Sign in, give your paperwork, and ask pertinent questions. Parents and coaches are excited for you but avoid letting them dominate a Q&A. It’s important that we interact with you and understand you are mature, thoughtful, and engaged enough to ask your own questions.” —Grant Kretchik, associate director of Pace University’s School of Performing Arts, and JV Mercanti, head of acting for the musical theater program at Pace University’s School of the Arts.

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"Playbill" feature Pace University in "Big 10: The 10 Most Represented Colleges on Broadway in the 2018-2019 Season"

09/11/2018

"Playbill" feature Pace University in "Big 10: The 10 Most Represented Colleges on Broadway in the 2018-2019 Season"

Looking at colleges? Interested in following in the footsteps of some of today's Broadway performers? See where they studied in case it might be a good fit for you, too!

As part of Playbill’s Back to School week (#BwayBacktoSchool), we have combined past Schools of the Stars features that track where members of the casts for each Broadway show went to college, along with a bit of added research, to present the ten colleges currently most represented on Broadway (plus a few honorable mentions). This list represents not only Broadway shows that are currently open, but a few shows that have announced casting for the 2018-2019 season. Check them out and see if your school (or the school you’re possibly considering) is on the list!

Editor’s Note: This is not intended to be a comprehensive account of working Broadway alumni from each university. The information used to create this list was gathered from actor bios published within Playbill Magazine and Schools of the Stars at the beginning of the 2018–2019 season, and is reflective of its September 10, 2018, publication date. Please also note that Playbill is only ranking college alumni currently on Broadway and not creating our own ranking system. At time of publication, the casts for Broadway productions of Ain’t Too Proud, Be More Chill and Beetlejuice were not yet announced.

(Tied for 9th)

Pace University: Alok Tewari (The Band’s Visit), Charlie Franklin (The Book of Mormon), Spencer Clark (Frozen), Lindsey Brett Carothers (Gettin’ the Band Back Together), Anthony Lee Medina (Hamilton), Sean Green Jr. (Hamilton), Zelig Williams (Hamilton), Christine Shepard (Head Over Heels), Kevin Csolak (Mean Girls), Kerstin Anderson (My Fair Lady), Daniel Yearwood (Once on this Island), Matt Farcher (Pretty Woman), Gabi Campo (The Prom), Brandon Kalm (Waitress), Jeff Heimbrock (Wicked)

The Juilliard School: Evan Todd (Beautiful), Nick Westrate (Bernhardt/Hamlet), Brittany Bradford (Bernhardt/Hamlet), Renée Fleming (Carousel), Corey John Snide (Carousel), Christopher Vo (The Cher Show), Daniel Breaker (Hamilton), Kyle Weiler (Hamilton), Katie Kreisler (Harry Potter), Tom Alan Robbins (Head Over Heels), Kamille Upshaw (Mean Girls), Joelle Gates (The Phantom of the Opera), Drew Wildman (Summer: The Donna Summer Musical), Frederick Weller (To Kill A Mockingbird), Michael Urie (Torch Song)

University of North Carolina School of the Arts: Davie Thomas Brown (The Book of Mormon), David Bushman (Chicago), Paul Whitty (Gettin’ the Band Back Together), Brian Abraham (Harry Potter), Daniel Stewart Sherman (Kinky Boots), Brian C. Binion (The Lion King), Courtnee Carter (Once on this Island), Isaac Powell (Once on this Island), T. Oliver Reid (Once on this Island), Jonathan Gould (School of Rock), Brian Ray Norris (SpongeBob SquarePants), Wesley Taylor (SpongeBob SquarePants), Allan K. Washington (SpongeBob SquarePants), Lucas Hedges (The Waverly Gallery), Sterling Masters (Wicked)

Northwestern University: Brad Weinstock (Aladdin), Amber Owens (Aladdin), Mary Beth Peil (Anastasia), Katrina Lenk (The Band’s Visit), Adam Kantor (The Band’s Visit), Ben Estus (The Book of Mormon), Madeline Weinstein (Harry Potter), Alex Weisman (Harry Potter), Erik Lochtefeld (King Kong), Scott Mikita (The Phantom of the Opera), Carrington Vilmont (The Phantom of the Opera), Jim Weitzer (The Phantom of the Opera), Ned Noyes (The Play That Goes Wrong), Anna Eilinsfeld (Pretty Woman), Antonette Cohen (Wicked)

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