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"News12" featured "Pace University journalism students to cover Puerto Rico"

03/13/2018

"News12" featured "Pace University journalism students to cover Puerto Rico"

A group of Pace University journalism students plans to head to Puerto Rico in an effort to shed light on the continuing hardships residents of the island are facing following the slow recovery after Hurricane Maria.

About a dozen students are preparing to head out next Tuesday and cover what appears to be the biggest story of their fledgling careers.

But it's also going to be educational.

"Students learn how to tell a story from start to finish," says Maria Luskey, who has overseen the school's documentary program for the past 15 years.

Past trips have sent students to Costa Rica, Brazil and Cuba. The school had planned to go to Puerto Rico earlier, but the storm forced Pace to cancel those plans.

Months later, with the recovery lagging and many on the island left isolated and ignored, the school decided to try again.

"These are 3.5 million American citizens who are in a desperate and dire situation, that months after the hurricane, they still need our help," says Gabriel Rivera, a Bronx native who has relatives in Puerto Rico.

In the next two weeks, News 12's Aime Rodriguez will be following the class to Puerto Rico for updates.

Watch News12.

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Statement from President Marvin Krislov on the passing of Erivan Haub

03/12/2018

Statement from President Marvin Krislov on the passing of Erivan Haub

“On behalf of the trustees, students, faculty, and staff of Pace University, I mourn the passing of Erivan Haub, a longtime friend and philanthropic supporter of Pace and especially our law school,” said Pace President Marvin Krislov. “Erivan’s passion for the United States and for the environment, inspired by his mother, Elisabeth, led to the Haub family’s long and successful partnership with Pace. We present the annual Haub Award for Environmental Diplomacy, and in 2016 we were honored to name our law school the Elisabeth Haub School of Law, in recognition of our long partnership and a generous gift from the Haub family. We send our deepest condolences to the Haub family, and most of all to Liliane Haub, Erivan’s daughter-in-law, who serves as a Pace trustee. Erivan’s leadership, friendship, and generosity will not be forgotten.”

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"Pleasantville Patch" featured "Pace University Students Learn 1st Lesson: New York is Our Campus"

03/12/2018

"Pleasantville Patch" featured "Pace University Students Learn 1st Lesson: New York is Our Campus"

More than 300 admitted Pace University students from 25 states slept at the American Museum of Natural History last week, highlighting that Pace students have the greatest campus – New York City. Typically admitted students stay in residence halls but this year they experienced their own "Night at the Museum."

"Pace students get much more than what's learned in the classroom, said Robina Schepp, Vice President of Enrollment Management and Placement at Pace. "Students graduate from Pace with the skills and training that prepare them for the real world. Here, the City is our campus, and what better way to experience the City then spending a night at one of the most iconic institutions in New York—The American Museum of Natural History."

The overnight experience at the Museum of Natural History included dinner, orientation, exploration of the museum rooms, tours, animal presentations, and a space show. The group arrived back at Pace after breakfast at the Museum. As part of the admitted student experience, Pace also showcases college life at the university, including offering students a chance to attend classes for a day.

Participants in the admitted student event learned more about Pace and its academic programs, toured the campus, met future classmates, students, alumni, and deans, as well as enjoyed panel discussions and presentations. The future Pace students had the option of attending a university activities fair with representatives from various academic programs, student clubs and organizations, housing, financial aid, residence life, career services, study abroad, counseling, the center for academic excellence and more.

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Press Release: Inaugural Dean’s Distinguished Lecture Series at Pace University Brought Together Thinkers and Leaders to Discuss Diversity and Inclusion

03/09/2018

Press Release: Inaugural Dean’s Distinguished Lecture Series at Pace University Brought Together Thinkers and Leaders to Discuss Diversity and Inclusion

NEW YORK, March 9 – The inaugural College of Health Professions Dean’s Distinguished Lecture Series at Pace University, a discussion of diversity and inclusion, was held March 5 at Pace’s lower Manhattan campus.

 “I believe diversity is one of the most pressing issues facing all of us today – in healthcare, in higher education, and across society,” said Harriet R. Feldman, dean and professor of the College of Health Professions. “We have in common a need to ensure diversity and inclusion in our workplaces, our schools, and our lives.”

“We are barraged daily with headlines and controversies, policy proposals and angry protests, on so many issues that relate directly to diversity and inclusion issues,” said Feldman. “I have had a longstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion, both personally and professionally. I could not be more proud of the progress we have made during my 25 years at Pace, both within our College and the University as a whole, to educate so many dedicated and diverse students, faculty, and professionals.”

The event was attended by more than 120 community members and brought together an expert panel of thinkers and leaders in the health professions to discuss diversity and inclusion. The Dean’s Distinguished Lecture Series at Pace will be an annual event bringing important topics forward for discussion.

Pace President Marvin Krislov quoted statistics that demonstrate Pace’s commitment to diversity. “We’re fully committed to diversity and inclusion at Pace,” said Krislov. “We’re proud of our diverse student body, and we’re actively working to further diversify our faculty and staff. Diversity and inclusion are keys to the best education, preparing students to succeed in the workplace.”

Dr. Rumay Alexander led the panel. Alexander is chief diversity officer and associate vice chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and president of the National League for Nursing.

Alexander was joined by four panelists:

*Pace President Marvin Krislov.

*Professor Randolph McLaughlin, a civil rights attorney and professor at Pace’s Elisabeth Haub School of Law. 

*Pace College of Health Professions Professor Joanne Singleton, an accomplished clinician, educator and researcher.

*Cornell Craig, Assistant Dean for Diversity and Inclusion and Director of Multicultural Affairs at Pace.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. A 2017 study by the Equality of Opportunity Project ranks Pace University first in the nation among four-year private institutions for upward economic mobility based on students who enter college at the bottom fifth of the income distribution and end up in the top fifth. www.pace.edu

Follow us on Twitter at @PaceUnews or on our website: http://www.pace.edu/news

 

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Press Release: No Bathing Suits or Tan Lines for Pace University Students Selecting a Spring Break of Service to Victims of Superstorm Sandy

03/07/2018

Press Release: No Bathing Suits or Tan Lines for Pace University Students Selecting a Spring Break of Service to Victims of Superstorm Sandy

Rockaway families still displaced by Superstorm Sandy to receive help from Pace students

NEW YORK, MARCH 7 – Superstorm Sandy struck more than five years ago. Those hardest hit are still struggling to rebuild, and many families have yet to return home. Pace University’s Center for Community Action and Research (CCAR) and 16 Pace student volunteers will travel to Rockaway Beach, Queens, to spend their Alternative Spring Break helping those still displaced by that historic storm.

From March 13 to 16, Pace student volunteers will help rebuild houses still damaged by Superstorm Sandy in Rockaway Beach, N.Y. The immersive learning experience will include guest lectures about how race, class, disaster relief policy, cultural attitudes, and political attitudes shape the ways communities have recovered from natural disasters from Hurricane Katrina in 2005 to Hurricanes Harvey and Maria in 2017.

“Pace students are doers and strivers,” said Marvin Krislov, president of Pace University. “We believe in learning by doing, and there’s no better way to do that than by giving back to our community. I’m pleased that these students will have this experiential education, and I’m even more pleased that they’re doing good for their fellow New Yorkers.”

“Pace students are helping families who still have not been able to return to their primary homes after the devastation of Hurricane Sandy,” said Dan Botting, associate director of the Center for Community Action and Research at Pace University. “After the headlines die down, people forget about natural disasters and do not realize the long-lasting effects on families in affected areas. Pace has made a long-lasting commitment to help people in our home city who are still trying to resume normalcy in their lives nearly six years later.”

This year, Pace continues to build upon its partnership with SBP, established over the last four

Alternative Spring Break trips. For four days and three nights, students will be volunteering and living in the communities that are still feeling the impact of this disaster. They will also be meeting with local organizations and community members to learn what the future holds for these areas and what needs to be done moving forward.  Students participating in the trip will bring back their experience through blog posts, articles for the student newspapers on both Pace’s New York City and Westchester County campuses, a petition signing, and more.

Since the spring of 2005, CCAR, housed in Pace’s Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, has sponsored an Alternative Spring Break experience, providing Pace students an opportunity to learn and explore the world through service.  Pace students have also traveled to New Orleans where they helped people rebuild in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. In New York City, they have served the homeless and hungry as well as those recovering from Superstorm Sandy. Community organizations Pace has worked with include Friends of Rockaway, Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Foundation, All Hands Volunteers, Housing Works, Ready, Willing, and Able, Metropolitan Council, Coalition for the Homeless, Homes for the Homeless, Greyston Bakery, and more.

Program itinerary provided on request.Link to upcoming ASB 18 student blog posts (not yet live):

http://ccar.blogs.pace.edu/tag/asb18/

About Dyson College of Arts and Sciences: Pace University’s liberal arts college, Dyson College offers more than 50 programs, spanning the arts and humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and pre-professional programs (including pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, and pre-law). The College offers access to numerous opportunities for internships, cooperative education and other hands-on learning experiences that complement in-class learning in preparing graduates for career and graduate/professional education choices.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. A 2017 study by the Equality of Opportunity Project ranks Pace University first in the nation among four-year private institutions for upward economic mobility based on students who enter college at the bottom fifth of the income distribution and end up in the top fifth. www.pace.edu

Follow us on Twitter at @PaceUnews or on our website: http://www.pace.edu/news

 

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"Hartford Courant" featured Seidenberg Alumna Dr. Elizabeth Teracino in "Elizabeth Teracino earns doctorate in economics in the Netherlands"

03/06/2018

"Hartford Courant" featured Seidenberg Alumna Dr. Elizabeth Teracino in "Elizabeth Teracino earns doctorate in economics in the Netherlands"

Dr. Elizabeth Teracino, an alumni of New Canaan High School (Class of 2000), earned her doctorate in the field of economics from the University of Groningen in the Netherlands. She publicly defended her Ph.D. dissertation on November 6, 2017 in the Academiegebouw in Groningen, Netherlands. Prior academic degrees include a B.S. in Business Administration from the Tepper Business School at Carnegie Mellon University, and a M.S. in Computer Science and Security from the Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems at Pace University.

Dr. Teracino's dissertation is entitled "Value Co-creation in the Cloud: Understanding Software-as-a-Service-Driven Convergence of the Enterprise Systems and Financial Services Industries." The dissertation addresses innovation management and strategy in emerging technology markets, more specifically due to companies moving into the Cloud and adopting a "Software as a Service" business model.

The physical book is available locally at the New Canaan Library and at the New York Public Library. The digital version of the book can be found online via rug.nl.

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"Bizz Times" featured Pace Alumni U.S. Marine Corps veteran Matthew Mainzer in "Heiman helps veterans transition to civilian careers"

03/05/2018

"Bizz Times" featured Pace Alumni U.S. Marine Corps veteran Matthew Mainzer in "Heiman helps veterans transition to civilian careers"

Featured in the photo Matthew Heiman

Vice president and assistant general counsel

Johnson Controls International plc

Nonprofit served: American Corporate Partners

Service: Career mentorship for veterans

From: "Bizz Times:"

In the fall of 2016, U.S. Marine Corps veteran Matthew Mainzer was in his final year at Pace University in New York City and, like many undergraduates with graduation on the horizon, wasn’t sure what his next professional step should be.

“I had ideas of what I wanted to do, but it was a blank space between now and then,” Mainzer said. “I mainly wanted help bouncing ideas and having someone to help me focus my plans.”

Around that time, Mainzer was paired with a mentor, Matthew Heiman, vice president and assistant general counsel at Johnson Controls International plc, to help him with the transition.

The two met through American Corporate Partners, a national nonprofit organization that pairs post-9/11 veterans with corporate professionals for year-long mentorships. Mentors help their protégés with resume building, interview preparation, career exploration, networking and leadership development.

Heiman has been mentoring veterans through the program for four years, initially while working for Tyco International PLC and now with Johnson Controls, following the companies’ merger.

Heiman, who is now in his fourth mentor partnership, said he’s motivated by an appreciation for veterans’ service and for the mentoring he received early on in his own career.

For a year, Heiman and Mainzer spoke for about an hour on the phone every two weeks, discussing Mainzer’s goals and plans. Mainzer, whose five years of military service included two deployments to Afghanistan, had his eye on graduate school, but also the possibility of a full-time job.

“We would talk about how do you manage competing priorities,” Heiman said. “It was a really easy assignment for me. Matt’s a bright guy who has a ton of options.”

Mainzer, meanwhile, found it helpful to have a sounding board while navigating post-college decisions.

“(The mentorship) was a short time commitment and I got an immense value out of our conversations,” Mainzer said. “I can say that there are some things I wouldn’t have been as successful with if not for our conversations and without advice from Matthew.”

In the fall of 2017, Mainzer moved to Novi Pazar, Serbia to begin a nine-month stint of teaching English through the Fulbright Program. This fall, he will begin studying at Johns Hopkins University Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies.

After that, he plans to join the U.S. Foreign Service.

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"Dance Magazine" covered "What It Takes to Make It As a Commercial Dancer" featuring Pace University Students

03/05/2018

"Dance Magazine" covered "What It Takes to Make It As a Commercial Dancer" featuring Pace University Students

The commercial dance world is full of exciting opportunities for dancers: music videos, Broadway shows, international concert tours. But how do dancers develop the skill set needed to survive in such a fast-paced industry? College is one option, and a few programs focus specifically on commercial dance. Here's how Studio School, Los Angeles and Pace University prepare students for a demanding career:

1. Versatility

Commercial dancers need to be prepared to tackle a wide variety of gigs, so students take classes like tap, circus arts, hip hop, ballroom, aerial work, improvisation and more.

2. Entrepreneurial skills

Image and online presence are key to landing jobs in the commercial world. Students learn about branding, marketing and social media as part of their curriculums.

3. Networking

Pace students can travel to Los Angeles and meet with agents, who regularly attend showcases and performances. Talent agency McDonald/Selznick Associates helped shape Studio School's curriculum, so students are learning skills that agents wish their clients knew.

4. Acting chops

Studio School students take 26 credits of on-camera acting technique, and Pace students study acting and singing.

As dancers, we all hop on "the track." We attend class every day at 10 am, we go to summer intensives every year, we regularly show up at audition after audition. It's what we think we need to do to achieve our dreams. 

But other things come up—maybe we change or what we want out of life evolves. It is up to us to listen, to see if we can let our plan shift and to be brave enough to veer off track. Otherwise, we may not discover what makes us truly unique.

Read the full article.

 

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Dyson College Professor of Communication Studies Adam G. Klein's featured article about the NRA's video channel in the "The Conversation"

03/02/2018

Dyson College Professor of Communication Studies Adam G. Klein's featured article about the NRA's video channel in the "The Conversation"

The Conversation: "NRA's video channel is a hotbed of online hostility"

By Adam G. Klein, Pace University 

Adam G. Klein is an assistant professor of communication studies at Pace University.

As the National Rifle Association, the most influential gun rights advocacy group in the United States, comes under pressure from victims' groups and gun control advocates, Internet companies like Amazon, Apple and YouTube are finding themselves uncomfortably close to the center of the controversy. These are among the companies that currently stream the NRA's official video channel, NRA TV.

NRA TV has become a central focus in what could be a threshold moment in the national gun debate. In the wake of the school shooting in Parkland, Fla., that claimed 17 lives, a consumer activist movement has worked to peel back the tight grip the NRA holds over the country's gun policy. The effort has driven some airlines, insurance companies, car rental companies and banks to sever their commercial and professional ties with the NRA. Now gun control activists are turning their full attention to the Internet.

In the world of online politics, it's not unusual to find videos inciting hostility. On Feb. 12, just days before the Parkland shooting, one such YouTube videofeatured a pundit smashing a sledgehammer through a TV set that featured liberal commentators, later declaring, "If we want to take back this nation from socialists who are out to destroy it ... you better believe we'll be pushing the truth on them." But that video was not the seething production of an obscure far-right blogger. It was the latest episode of the official video channel of the NRA.

NRA TV is not merely a platform for promoting Second Amendment rights or engaging gun enthusiasts. As a researcher of online extremism, I'd contend it has become one of the web's most incendiary hotspots for stoking outrage at liberal America, attacking perceived enemies like Black Lives Matter and the Women's March, and promoting the message that America is under threat from the so-called "violent left" - an especially alarming term, coming from a gun lobby.

What is NRA TV?

Given the channel's association with the NRA, a newcomer to NRA TV might reasonably expect information on gun safety, Second Amendment rights and a community for firearms enthusiasts and collectors. Its focus is none of those things. Instead, visitors find a virtual hornet's nest of hard-right politics. 

In my work, I came across NRA TV while tracking far-right and far-left groups' activities on Twitter. One such group had retweeted a video from NRA TV featuring host Dana Loesch calling the mainstream media "the rat [expletive] of the earth" whom she was happy to see "curb stomped."

The acidic tone of NRA TV represents an astonishing evolution of an organization that began as a rifle club to promote marksmanship. Even the NRA of the 1980s, which ran TV ads on the right to bear arms, would be hard to recognize as a forebear to today's version. My study of 224 NRA TV videos and tweets over two months in 2017 found that only 34 dealt with topics related to direct gun advocacy or gun ownership. The remaining 190, or about five out of every six posts, were trained on perceived political enemies, trading the core mission of gun rights for incessant attacks on "crazed liberals" and "hateful leftists."

It is hard to recall an NRA that once viewed itself as a bipartisan body. Its current online hosts warn that opponents of President Donald Trump will "perish in the political flames of their own fires." Even more provocative is the portrayal of the NRA's declared adversaries, framed not as political foes, but as ideological and even existential threats. The Women's March is labeled "a bigoted, fake feminist, jihad-supporting" movement, while Black Lives Matter is described as "a dangerous, hateful, destructive ideology." 

The dystopian picture that NRA TV portrays includes government officials encouraging violent protests against conservative groups, and a media-sponsored "war on cops." The NRA believes it must be ready to defend itself and the country against these and other forces.

In a video that streamed to NRA TV's 260,000 Twitter followers in August 2017, host Grant Stinchfield asked his audience, 

"What scares me more than the North Korean crazed tyrant? The violent left and the crazed liberals who lead them. They like North Korea also pose a clear and present danger to America ... Make no mistake, the lying leftist media, the elitist cringe-worthy celebrities, and the anti-American politicians -- who make up the violent left -- don't just hate President Trump, they hate you."

The insinuation that left-wing forces are out to destroy the country by sabotaging its institutions is a demagogic refrain with echoes of the anti-communist McCarthy era. But it is particularly unsettling when it emanates from a lobby that simultaneously promotes the necessity of gun ownership. Which brings us back to Amazon.

Pulling the plug

After another shooting at an American high school at the hands of a 19-year-old with an AR-15, the gun-control advocacy movement has turned its attention to its chief opponent, the NRA. The strategy is to dislodge the influence of the NRA by going after its support system. That has led activists to Amazon, Apple, Roku and other services that stream NRA TV content. While other companies support the NRA financially, these Internet giants provide perhaps a more valuable currency in their prominent platforms that allow the NRA to distribute its message. 

Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America is one organization leading the charge for Internet companies to drop NRA TV, citing its "violence-inciting programming." The group is joined by some of the survivors of the Parkland shooting, such as David Hogg, who is encouraging people to boycott tech companies that carry NRA TV. A petition on Change.org, with 240,000 signatures as of Thursday, is simultaneously calling on Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos to purge NRA content from his site's offerings. And on Twitter, #dropNRATV is gaining steam, even as the channel continues to host controversial content.

The growing wave of consumer activists has effectively placed the Internet's biggest gatekeepers in the middle of America's hyperpolarized gun debate. As web hosts, their power to amplify or quiet controversial messages is unmatched in the modern media landscape. But in many ways, this is not strictly a gun issue. Rather, a closer look at NRA TV suggests that this is also an issue of community standards, which are well within a web host's domain. 

The ConversationAnd in recent months, YouTube and Twitter have each demonstrated a willingness to enforce stricter terms of service prohibiting hateful, dangerous or abusive material from their networks. So the real question that these Internet companies now face is whether an NRA tirade about American liberals posing a "clear and present danger" is legitimate gun advocacy, or barefaced incitement.

Read the article.

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"NY Students Quick to Throw Themselves Into March Organizing," featured in "Juvenile Justice" by Clarissa Sosin

03/02/2018

"NY Students Quick to Throw Themselves Into March Organizing," featured in "Juvenile Justice" by Clarissa Sosin

Juvenile Justice: "NY Students Quick to Throw Themselves Into March Organizing"

By Clarissa Sosin 

It was late in the evening on Feb. 16 when Joey Wong’s flight from La Guardia Airport in New York City landed at Fort Lauderdale Airport in Florida. Instead of going to his family’s home, he headed straight to his friend Robert Schentrup’s house. Schentrup’s sister, Carmen, had been killed two days earlier. She was one of the 17 slain by Nicholas Cruz when he entered Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida with a loaded AR-15.  

The thought of someone walking into his alma mater with an assault rifle and slaughtering students in the hallways where he’d spent the majority of four years of his life was unfathomable.

“Thinking about it, it like shakes me to my core,” he said. 

Wong didn’t leave Schentrup’s house until 5 a.m. the next day. It was the first time the 18-year-old had consoled someone after a death. 

The following days were a blur, he said. He slept little, ate poorly and spent most of his time with other Stoneman Douglas alumni who had returned. When the funerals were announced for Carmen and Nicholas Dworet, another victim Wong knew, he pushed back his return flight so he could attend them. At some point, he’s not sure when, he heard talk of plans for a March 24 event in Washington: the March For Our Lives.

Even though the shooting took place in a tony suburb in Southern Florida, it has rallied high school students in New York City and other cities across the country to join the front lines of one of the nation’s most contentious political issues. Inspired by the fury of the young survivors of what is now knowns as the Parkland shooting, New York’s high schoolers and their supporters are working together to arrange transportation to Washington for would-be marchers. They are also planning a sister march in New York City for the same day for those who can’t make the trip.

Right now, there are nearly 30,000 people on the official Facebook page who plan to attend the march with another 86,000 who have expressed interest. In New York City there are nearly 9,000attendees and 23,000 interested.

Wong, who wears a maroon Stoneman Douglas water polo team jacket around his neighborhood, took it on himself to help organize students at Pace University, where he is a freshman. He’s providing support to the New York City march organizers and working on transportation for the Pace students who want to march in Washington. 

Wong, who has never participated in a march before, said he plans to march mostly with the Pace University contingent but will also spend time with his friend Robert Schentrup and other Stoneman Douglas alumni.

“These [New York] kids don’t know Douglas,” he said. “They don’t know Parkland. They don’t know Florida. So the fact that they are coming to D.C. to support this small little community means a lot and would say a lot.” 

And the inspiration stemming from the Parkland survivors extends beyond march day organizing efforts.

Read the full article.

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