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Press Release: Prospective Pace University Students Learn First Lesson: “New York City is Our Campus"

03/02/2018

Press Release: Prospective Pace University Students Learn First Lesson: “New York City is Our Campus"

Admistted  students will experience their own “Night at the Museum” at the American Museum of Natural History on March 4

NEW YORK, MARCH 2—Pace University will host an overnight at the American Museum of Natural History on March 4, highlighting that Pace students have the greatest campus – New York City.

As part of annual admitted student overnight experiences, Pace will showcase college life at the university, including offering students a chance to attend classes for a day. Typically the admitted students stay in residence halls but this year they will experience their own “Night at the Museum.”

“Pace students get much more than what’s learned in the classroom, said Robina Schepp, Vice President of Enrollment Management and Placement at Pace. “Students graduate from Pace with the skills and training that prepare them for the real world. Here, the City is our campus, and what better way to experience the City then spending a night at one of the most iconic institutions in New York—The American Museum of Natural History.”

This year, more than 300 admitted Pace New York City students from 25 states and their chaperones will be transported by private bus to the Museum after a jam-packed day of events and activities. The overnight experience at the Museum of Natural History will include dinner, orientation, exploration of the museum rooms, tours, animal presentations, and a space show. The group will head back to Pace after breakfast at the Museum on Monday, March 5 at 9am.

Participants in the admitted student event will learn more about Pace and its academic programs, tour the campus, meet future classmates, students, alumni, and deans, as well as enjoy panel discussions and presentations. The future Pace students have the option of attending a university activities fair with representatives from various academic programs, student clubs and organizations, housing, financial aid, residence life, career services, study abroad, counseling, the center for academic excellence and more. The overnight component of the experience is optional.

About Pace University: Since 1906, Pace has educated thinking professionals by providing high quality education for the professions on a firm base of liberal learning amid the advantages of the New York metropolitan area. A private university, Pace has campuses in Lower Manhattan and Westchester County, NY, enrolling nearly 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in its Lubin School of Business, Dyson College of Arts and Sciences, College of Health Professions, School of Education, Elisabeth Haub School of Law, and Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. A 2017 study by the Equality of Opportunity Project ranks Pace University first in the nation among four-year private institutions for upward economic mobility based on students who enter college at the bottom fifth of the income distribution and end up in the top fifth. www.pace.edu

Follow Pace’s Office of Media Relations on Twitter at @PaceUnews or on the web: www.pace.edu/news.

 

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Ibraiz Tarique, director of HR programs at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business is quoted in "Westchester County Business Journal" speaking about student loan assistance

03/01/2018

Ibraiz Tarique, director of HR programs at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business is quoted in "Westchester County Business Journal" speaking about student loan assistance

Westchester County Business Journal: "New employee benefit: help with the student loan bill"

By Ryan Deffenbaugh

From "Westchester County Business Journal:"

...Ibraiz Tarique, director of HR programs at Pace University’s Lubin School of Business, said it’s important to view student loan assistance as part of an overall talent strategy that employers are adopting. Companies are often maxed out in the salaries they can offer to attract top talent, so they are getting creative with employee benefits.

“They’re trying to figure out ways to differentiate themselves and this is an emerging tool in attracting talent,” Tarique said. “And I think it will pick up as more companies, and smaller companies, realize it’s an important tool they can use.”

That could apply especially to Westchester County, which has a mix of industries requiring advanced degrees and skills, including headquarters for several Fortune 500 companies. Those employers are all competing for workers at a time when Westchester’s unemployment rate hovers below 5 percent.

Read the full article.

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Dean Harriet Feldman, College of Health Professions and Lienhard School of Nursing, featured in "Diverse Issues in Higher Education" on "Meeting Nursing Demands Through Diversity"

02/26/2018

Dean Harriet Feldman, College of Health Professions and Lienhard School of Nursing Dean featured in "Diverse Issues in Higher Education" on "Meeting Nursing Demands Through Diversity"

Diverse Issues in Higher Education: "Meeting Nursing Demand Through Diversity"

by Lois Elfman

From "Diverse Issues:"

...At the College of Health Professions and Lienhard School of Nursing at Pace University, two home grown faculty members have already taken their spots. They are teaching undergraduate students and are working on developing their research. Pace’s “grow our own” specifically targets minority students.

“We recently started a Ph.D. program and we have about 10 students in that program,” says Dr. Harriet Feldman, a professor and dean of Pace’s nursing school. “Two of them are [currently] clinical faculty (teaching clinical practice and working with students in the field). Assuming everything goes well, they will reach their Ph.D.s in a few years and be able to enter tenure-track roles, whether here or somewhere else.”

Ross says that, when she was an undergraduate nursing student at Coppin State University, the professors created a love for the profession and a desire to continue the school’s legacy.

“When professors create that desire in the students to give back to the university and to their community, that’s when those students want to come back and teach,” says Ross, who also strongly voices the opinion that, if faculty positions paid salaries commensurate with clinical work, more people in the nursing workforce would pursue teaching.

To help build motivation among Pace students, education courses are in the graduate curriculum. At present, approximately half the students in the school of nursing are underrepresented minorities.

“We’re planting seeds,” says Feldman, who is also launching a distinguished lecture series to provide exposure for the nursing program to diverse individuals. “We’ve also built an environment where people want to teach. We have terrific outcomes in terms of our students finding employment and passing licensure and certification exams.”

Read the full article.

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Alumni Mike Adenuga ranks 3rd in "Business Insider's" world's richest black billionaires of 2018

02/26/2018

Alumni Mike Adenuga ranks 3rd in "Business Insider's" world's richest black billionaires of 2018

Business Insider: "Meet the world's richest black billionaires of 2018"

By Harrison Jacobs

From Business Insider:

3. Mike Adenuga, $5.4 billion

Nigerian Mike Adenuga, 64, is chairman of telecommunications company Globacom, which has 36 million subscribers, as well as the majority owner of Lagos-based oil company Conoil, according to Bloomberg.

While earning an MBA from Pace University in New York, he drove a taxi to pay the bills. Today, Adenuga, who has seven children, is the second-wealthiest man in Nigeria, according to Forbes.

Net worth: $5.4 billion

Age: 64

Citizenship: Nigeria

Industry: Telecommunications

Source of wealth: Self-made

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Alumna Andrea Marra wants to be NY’s first transgender state senator featured in "City and State New York"

02/26/2018

Alumna Andrea Marra wants to be NY’s first transgender state senator featured in "City and State New York"

City and State NY: "IDC's Peralta gets second challenger, who would be a first"

By David Colon

Andrea Marra wants to be NY’s first transgender state senator

Since the 2016 election resulted in Donald Trump’s presidency and a renewed energy among New York’s liberal activists, candidates across the state are lining up to challenge members of the Independent Democratic Conference, the breakaway group of Democratic state Senators who share power with the Republican caucus. Progressive pressure groups such as the Working Families Party, have labeled IDC members “Trump Dems,” and lent support to their primary opponents.

Most of the races only feature one primary challenger. On Monday, Lewis Kaminski dropped his campaign against IDC leader Jeff Klein and endorsed fellow challenger Alessandra Biaggi. But, with the entrance of trans activist and Jackson Heights resident Andrea Marra, Queens’ District 13 will now host a three-way race to determine whether state Senator Jose Peralta remains the Democratic nominee in November.

Until early February, Peralta was only facing a primary challenge from Jessica Ramos, a former press aide to Mayor Bill de Blasio. But Marra’s announced her candidacy on February 8th in a district composed of Jackson Heights, East Elmhurst, Corona and parts of Astoria and Woodside.

Marra, 32, who was born in Seoul before she was adopted by a white family who lived in the Capital Region, has spent her career as an activist working on LGBTQ rights and pro-immigration causes. She first got a taste of activism in high school by lobbying for the passage of New York’s Dignity for All Students Act, which was eventually signed into law in 2010 to combat bullying and discrimination in schools. Marra moved to New York City to study at Pace University and has spent her post-college career working with organizations including Nodutdol for Korean Community Development and GLAAD, where she worked to help end Don’t Ask Don’t Tell in the US military. Currently she serves as a communications manager for the Arcus Foundation, an LGBT right organization.

Marra believes that her election, which would make her the first transgender state Senator and the first Asian-American state Senator in New York history, would help add a sense of urgency to efforts to pass the Gender Expression Non-Discrimination Act (GENDA), a bill which would add gender identity to the state’s Human Rights Law and has been unable to make it out of the Senate since its introduction in 2003. “Even for some Democrats, they’re still coming to terms with what GENDA means and how it impacts the trans community,” Marra told City & State. “I think that’s fair, but we need fresh leadership in the state legislature to be able to talk about those issues in an authentic way.”

In addition to Marra's campaign to become the first transgender state Senator, Melissa Skarz from Queens is vying to unseat Brian Barnwell in the 30th Assembly district to become that body's first trans legislator.

Read the full article.

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Vanya Quinones has been appointed provost of Pace University, effective July 1, 2018

02/26/2018

Vanya Quinones has been appointed provost of Pace University, effective July 1, 2018

Diverse Education: "VANYA QUIÑONES"

From Diverse Education:

VANYA QUIÑONES, who serves as associate provost for student success and retention at CUNY’s Hunter College, has been appointed provost of Pace University, effective July 1, 2018. She has bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Puerto Rico and a Ph.D. from Rutgers University.

Read the article.

 

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Executive director of Pace University’s publishing program in Dyson College of Arts and Sciences and president of the Women’s National Book Association Jane Kinney-Denning featured article in "Publishers Weekly" speaks out on sexual harassment

02/26/2018

Executive director of Pace University’s publishing program in Dyson College of Arts and Sciences and president of the Women’s National Book Association Jane Kinney-Denning featured article in "Publishers Weekly" speaks out on sexual harassment

Publishers Weekly: "A Call to Action for Publishers In the #MeToo Moment"

By Jane Kinney-Denning

Jane Kinney-Denning is the executive director of Pace University’s publishing program and president of the Women’s National Book Association.

From Publishers Weekly:

The president of the Women’s National Book Association speaks out on sexual harassment.

As the truly disturbing revelations of sexual harassment in the film, media, and publishing industries have been breaking over the past few months, we have been talking and writing and wondering about how to create safe, diverse, and equitable workplaces—workplaces where sexual harassment and discrimination are not tolerated, and where everyone is held accountable for their actions.

When the Weinstein, Rose, and Lauer media powerhouses fell so quickly and so permanently, I was sure that the book publishing industry would also have its day of reckoning. After all, for decades, many in the industry have experienced the nightmare of sexual harassment and discrimination without a safe outlet for protection or support.

I also thought that, finally, the gross inequities in pay that still exist for women, the imbalance in the share of management positions held by men, and the profound lack of diversity within publishing houses and in what is being published would be widely and publicly acknowledged as publishing’s culture problem. I thought that serious efforts would be made, by people in the positions to do so, to take the critical steps needed to change the culture of our industry by promoting equality as well as humanity in its own ranks.

The silence on these issues from publishers has, for the most part, been deafening. But I am not without hope. While frustrating, it is a reminder that change does not come easily or swiftly, and that there is still a lot of work to be done. And that those of us in the trenches are the ones who have to do it. Women have always been on the forefront of social and cultural change, and they have been fighting for equality in publishing for a very long time, including during a very active period in the 1970s when women were striking and attempting to unionize in the face of gross inequalities in the workplace.

Throughout my career, and especially with my volunteer work as the president of the Women’s National Book Association, a 100-year-old organization founded on the belief in the power of books to facilitate change and promote social justice, I have witnessed the capacity of collaboration and community to open minds and facilitate change. I believe now, more than ever, in the importance of books in teaching compassion, humanity, and understanding, and I want books to be brought to life in fair, equitable, and safe workplaces that set an example for the rest of the world.

Organizations like We Need Diverse Books, the newly formed People of Color in Publishing, and Vida, a nonprofit group that has brought close scrutiny to which books are being reviewed and by whom in major literary publications, are working hard to focus the attention of the publishing industry on the critical issues of diversity, equality, and the need for a cultural shift in the publishing workplace. They are organized and their voices are being heard.

I believe that members of the publishing community have a responsibility to continue to push the industry to better reflect who they are and the values that they hold. I am only one person, and I don’t have all of the answers, but I do believe that we have strength in numbers and that being organized allows us to push doors open even farther. Sexual harassment and discrimination in the workplace are a collective problem, and we need the strength of all of us to fight against it.

So, my advice to those in the industry? Don’t let your weariness keep you down: participate, speak up, speak out, support, and volunteer. Use your knowledge and talents to move these conversations and cultural shifts forward. In the words of Angela Davis, “Radical simply means ‘grasping things at the root.’ ”

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President Marvin Krislov profiled in "Westchester Magazine" speaking about "How to Get Into College"

02/21/2018

President Marvin Krislov profiled in "Westchester Magazine" speaking about "How to Get Into College"

Westchester Magazine: "How to Get Into College"

President Krislov and five other college presidents were interviewed at a round-table discussion recently in Westchester County. "Westchester Magazine" profiled the higher ed leaders in an article offering advice for high school students on how to get into college.

From the article in "Westchester Magazine" by Amy R. Partridge:

Six Westchester college presidents share their thoughts on what local high school students should do - and not do - to up their chances of admission.

Pace President Marvin Krislov said, "One area where we can help parents do a better job is in encouraging them to let their students navigate problems by themselves. We can help parents help their children by teaching them the skills to work within the institutional framework."

Read the full article here.

Read Westchester Magazine article online.

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Pace University graduate Nabiyah Be feature film debut "Black Panther" featured in "Westchester Magazine"

02/21/2018

Pace University graduate Nabiyah Be feature film debut "Black Panther" featured in "Westchester Magazine"

Westchester Magazine: "Watch This Pace Alumna Kick Ass in Marvel's Epic 'Black Panther'

by Dave Zucker

The Westchester grad Nabiyah Be's feature film debut is also slated to be one of the biggest movies of the year.

Marvel’s Black Panther premiered over the weekend, bringing with it critical acclaim, massive box office revenue, and cementing itself as a cultural touchstone; its predominantly black cast features butt-kicking women (who actually pass the Bechdel test) and introduces Western audiences to an afrofuturistic utopia.

Pace University graduate Nabiyah Be had another reason to be excited: the film marked the Brazilian actress’ feature film debut.

“Before I came to Pace, I knew that I had the potential to create, but I didn’t know exactly how to create on my own,” said Be in a video interview for the Pace School of Performing Arts. “I’m born and raised in Salvador, which is the capital of Bahia in Brazil, and they say that people in Bahia are not just born, they debut. Pace enabled that for me.”

Be appears in the film alongside Hollywood superstars like Chadwick Boseman (King T’Challa/Black Panther himself), Lupita Nyong’o, Michael B. Jordan, Angela Basset, and Forest Whitaker. And when we say, “appears alongside,” we really mean alongside.

We’d tell you to catch Be in Black Panther in theaters, but with a $235 million opening weekend, you probably already have tickets, so we’ll just say "Enjoy!"

Read the article.

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Pace University's theater alumna Nabiyah Be superhero role in "Black Panther" featured in "Caribbean Life"

02/21/2018

Pace University's theater alumna Nabiyah Be superhero role in "Black Panther" featured in "Caribbean Life"

Caribbean Life: "Caribbean Superheroes among ‘Black Panther’ party"

by Vinette K. Pryce

From "Caribbean Life:"

By now everyone knows the film “Black Panther” is not a documentary about a 1960s, California, Black revolutionary political party / group that scared America straight wearing all-black outfits, toting weapons and fearlessly proclaiming “power to the people.”

In fact, the 1966 Marvel Comics creation is a 134-minutes feature and all the rage for being the highest grossing comic book character, which stars an all-Black cast and received critical acclaim throughout the world and shines a global spotlight on a continent the president of the United States considers a s***hole.

Making its world premiere prior to President’s Day holiday, the groundbreaking film set in the African nation of Wakanda features immigrants, Caribbean nationals and some of the fiercest and wisest women to dominate any dynasty or administration.

Among the women listed in starring roles are: Angela Bassett, Mexico-born, Kenyan Lupita Nyung’o, Guyana-born Letitia Wright and Brazil-born Jamaican Nabiyah Be.

Jamaicans on the island joined legions of anxious moviegoers throughout the world last Friday to catch first day screenings of the anticipated sci-fi / fantasy which in addition to its alluring advance promotion also features Be, the daughter of reggae legend Jimmy Cliff.

Cliff’s foray with acting includes starring roles in “The Harder They Come” and “Bongo Man” with featured roles alongside Robin Williams in the comedy “Club Paradise.”

Be’s reversed path to the spotlight found her singing and acting on the Brazilian stage. Born on the South American continent, like her father she is also a singer.

On his many tours to Brazil she accompanied him singing background vocals and also toured with him extensively.

After arriving here, she attended Pace University to study theater and eventually landed Off-Broadway roles.

This major movie debut placed Be alongside some of Hollywood’s hallmark actors — Forest Whitaker, Michael B. Jordan, Sterling K. Brown, Nyung’o, Bassett and Chadwick Boseman.

Be’s character, Tilda Johnson is actually Nightshade.

Nightshade debuted in Steve Englehart and Alan Weiss’ Captain America #164 in 1973. In the comics, she is able to turn convicts into werewolves with a serum she created. Given her specialties in biology, chemistry and robotics among others, Nightshade was the third villain casted for the film following Killmonger and M’Baku (Winston Duke).

Read the full article.

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