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Patch featured Pace University's Environmental Policy Clinic in "Gov. Cuomo Signs Pace University's Endangered Species Bill"

09/25/2020

Patch featured Pace University's Environmental Policy Clinic in "Gov. Cuomo Signs Pace University's Endangered Species Bill"

Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo has signed into law a bill increasing New York State's powers to protect endangered species from the threat of federal policies that weaken protections. The bill was based on research conducted by student clinicians in Pace University's Environmental Policy Clinic.

Alumna Allie Granger '19, as a student, found a loophole in the five-decade old state law that would allow the U.S. Department of the Interior to remove any species its designation had automatically placed on the New York State list, even if the state believed those species still needed protection. In such a case, the state would then have to launch its own research and regulatory process, which could leave species unprotected indefinitely, according to Granger.

The new law, sponsored by Assemblywoman Didi Barrett and Senator Todd Kaminsky, empowers the Commissioner of Environmental Conservation to protect the state's animals and plants, "regardless of the removal of such designation as an endangered or threatened species by the Secretary of the Interior." 

Read the full Patch article.

 

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Press Release: GOV. CUOMO SIGNS PACE UNIVERSITY’S ENDANGERED SPECIES BILL

09/24/2020

Press Release: GOV. CUOMO SIGNS PACE UNIVERSITY’S ENDANGERED SPECIES BILL

Environmental Policy Clinic Sought Stronger Protections from Weakened Federal Law

PLEASANTVILLE, N.Y. – (September 24, 2020) -- Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo has signed into law a bill increasing New York State’s powers to protect endangered species from the threat of federal policies that weaken protections. The bill was based on research conducted by student clinicians in Pace University’s Environmental Policy Clinic.

Alumna Allie Granger ‘19, as a student, found a loophole in the five-decade old state law that would allow the U.S. Department of the Interior to remove any species its designation had automatically placed on the New York State list, even if the state believed those species still needed protection. In such a case, the state would then have to launch its own research and regulatory process, which could leave species unprotected indefinitely, according to Granger.

The new law, sponsored by Assemblywoman Didi Barrett and Senator Todd Kaminsky, empowers the Commissioner of Environmental Conservation to protect the state’s animals and plants, “regardless of the removal of such designation as an endangered or threatened species by the Secretary of the Interior.”

“Critical species are declining worldwide,” said Michelle Land, clinical associate professor in Dyson College’s Department of Environmental Studies and Science. “The federal government has sent many signals it may further weaken endangered species protections. Any state that relies on federal designations must strengthen its laws, or risk losing key native species.”

“In some circumstances, such as migrating animals, the federal government may possess the evidence to designate them as endangered or threatened,” said Granger. “But if it removes that designation for its own reasons, it can leave state species without vital protections.” Granger, who conducted her research in 2018 while a student in Dyson College’s Masters in Environmental Policy program, is now a policy associate with the Animal Welfare Institute in Washington, DC.

One example cited by the Policy Clinic is Atlantic Sturgeon, the iconic state fish that can reach more than 200 pounds, and which migrates from the ocean to spawn in the Hudson River. In 2012, the Department of the Interior gave it endangered species status based on federal research. “That action automatically added the sturgeon to the New York State list. Under the new law, it will remain on the state list as long as the Commissioner of Environmental Conservation deems necessary, even if Interior removes it from the federal list,” said Professor Land.

The Pace Environmental Policy Clinic has earned a national reputation for its work developing innovative environmental protections on a range of issues. The New York State Elephant Protection Act, authored and lobbied by Clinic students, was the first law in the nation to prohibit the use of elephants in circuses and all other forms of entertainment. The Clinic was co-founded and is taught by Professor Land, Dyson College, and John Cronin, director of the Blue CoLab at Pace’s Seidenberg School of Computer Science and Information Systems. In fulfillment of Pace University’s dedication to civic engagement, the Clinic trains undergraduate students as policy practitioners, lobbyists, and advocates through a program of learning and service. Students apply their Pace University education to the creation of real-world environmental solutions and the development of professional skills that serve society.

About Dyson College: Pace University’s liberal arts college, Dyson College offers more than 50 programs, spanning the arts and humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and pre-professional programs (including pre-medicine, pre-veterinary, and pre-law), as well as many courses that fulfil core curriculum requirements. The College offers access to numerous opportunities for internships, cooperative education and other hands-on learning experiences that complement in-class learning in preparing graduates for career and graduate/professional education choices. www.pace.edu/dyson.

About Pace University 
Pace University has a proud history of preparing its diverse student body for a lifetime of professional success as a result of its unique program that combines rigorous academics and real-world experiences. Pace is ranked the #1 private, four-year college in the nation for upward economic mobility by Harvard University’s Opportunity Insights, evidence of the transformative education the University provides. From its beginnings as an accounting school in 1906, Pace has grown to three campuses, enrolling 13,000 students in bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs in more than 150 majors and programs, across a range of disciplines: arts, sciences, business, health care, technology, law, education, and more. The university also has one of the most competitive performing arts programs in the country. Pace has a signature, newly renovated campus in New York City, located in the heart of vibrant Lower Manhattan, next to Wall Street and City Hall, and two campuses in Westchester County, New York: a 200-acre picturesque Pleasantville Campus and a Law School in White Plains. www.pace.edu. Follow us on Twitter at @PaceUnews or on our website: http://www.pace.edu/news

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National Public Radio featured Sociology Professor Mariajose Romero in "School Attendance In The COVID Era: What Counts As 'Present'?"

09/24/2020

National Public Radio featured Sociology Professor Mariajose Romero in "School Attendance In The COVID Era: What Counts As 'Present'?"

The carrot and the stick

Mariajose Romero, a Pace University sociologist who has researched attendance for decades, calls it "a piece of information that has tremendous political currency," which only intensified when it became a measure of school accountability. Not only students, but also schools, succeed or fail based on the students who show up every day. And so, "it's important to count people properly."

...

Of course, this raises the question of who is extended this kind of "creative" leniency. Romero, at Pace University, worries that high-income schools may be more likely than those in poor neighborhoods to provide excused absences for, say, a mid-year vacation. Meanwhile, she adds, "sometimes I'm concerned that the issue of chronic absence is used to demonise families in need."

Listen to the NPR segment.

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Associated Press featured associate professor of communication studies Adam Klein in "Trump, social media, right-wing news stir up antifa scares"

09/24/2020

Associated Press featured associate professor of communication studies Adam Klein in "Trump, social media, right-wing news stir up antifa scares"

Adam Klein, an associate professor of communication studies at Pace University, analyzed social media posts by far-right extremists and antifascist activists leading up to the Charlottesville rally three years ago. He found antifascists have a “pretty loose” communication network.“You don’t get the sense online that there is an organization as much as there are some prominent (social media) accounts associated with antifa,” he said.

Read the full Associated Press article.

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Fox News featured Dyson Professor Darrin Porcher in "NY AG announces new policy on bodycam footage"

09/23/2020

Fox News featured Dyson Professor Darrin Porcher in "NY AG announces new policy on bodycam footage"

Dr. Darrin Porcher, former NYPD lieutenant, and Anthony Napolitano, former police officer, join 'Fox and Friends First' to discuss AG’s decision to release bodycam footage.

Watch the Fox interview. 

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SwimSwam.com featured Dyson Associate Professor Linda Escobar Olszewski piece "Disruption, Sports and Pandemic: How Colleges Are Failing Student-Athletes"

09/17/2020

SwimSwam.com featured Dyson Associate Professor Linda Escobar Olszewski piece "Disruption, Sports and Pandemic: How Colleges Are Failing Student-Athletes"

Linda Escobar Olszewski, PsyD, is a NY State licensed clinical psychologist, Associate Professor of Psychology, and Director of the McShane Center for Psychological Services at Pace University in New York City. She also writes a popular blog for Psychology Today.

Over the past months the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted everyone across the globe. Unfortunately for the human race, this is not the first time (or last) a pandemic has brought life-as-we-know it to a screeching halt. The 1918 Spanish flu devastated the global population in for two years, causing an estimated 50 million deaths world-wide. In 1957, the Asian Flu, killed over one million people and the 1968 Hong Kong flu killed an estimated four million people world-wide. Currently CORONA-19 has erased nearly one million lives to date. Despite containment efforts and the promise of a vaccine the economic ramifications have been far reaching and its emotional burden has created a monstrous mental health crisis. 

Read the full SwimSwam.com article.

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