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The New York Law Journal featured Haub Law Assistant Dean Jill Backer's piece "Will the Pandemic Put the Final Nail in the Coffin of On-Campus Interviewing?"

02/25/2021

The New York Law Journal featured Haub Law Assistant Dean Jill Backer's piece "Will the Pandemic Put the Final Nail in the Coffin of On-Campus Interviewing?"

Assistant Dean Jill Backer writes about on-campus recruiting in the pandemic in the New York Law Journal: Will the Pandemic Put the Final Nail in the Coffin of On-Campus Interviewing? Traditionally the Am Law 100 and 200 law firms would all arrive on the doorsteps of law schools each summer to interview their best and brightest to be summer associates for the following summer. Success during these 20-minute screener interviews on campus meant a full callback interview at the firm. The callback interviews usually consisted of two partners and two associates in succession and then a meal or something more social—totaling anywhere from two to six hours. The end result of this process was a golden ticket to join an Am Law firm.

Traditionally the Am Law 100 and 200 law firms would all arrive on the doorsteps of law schools each summer to interview their best and brightest to be summer associates for the following summer. Success during these 20-minute screener interviews on campus meant a full callback interview at the firm. The callback interviews usually consisted of two partners and two associates in succession and then a meal or something more social—totaling anywhere from two to six hours. The end result of this process was a golden ticket to join an Am Law firm. However, the process was onerous for both interviewer and interviewee alike.

Read the full  New York Law Journal article.

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WestLaw featured Haub Law Professor Randolph McLaughlin in "KKK Act suit against Trump evokes violent past, troubled present"

02/25/2021

WestLaw featured Haub Law Professor Randolph McLaughlin in "KKK Act suit against Trump evokes violent past, troubled present"

It's a disturbing sign of the times that the Ku Klux Klan Act of 1871, which was enacted amid widespread post-Civil War racial violence, is increasingly en vogue. The law was used to sue the group responsible for the deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia in 2017. According to a Feb. 17 NBC News article, the law had been mostly dormant for nearly a century, until attorney Randolph McLaughlin used it in a federal lawsuit brought against the Justice Knights of the Ku Klux Klan by five Black women in 1980. The women had been seriously injured in April that year by Klansmen who randomly fired shotguns at them in their Chattanooga, Tennessee neighborhood.

Read the full Reuters article.

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San Francisco Chronicle & Laredo Morning Times featured Haub Law Professor Darren Rosenblum in "New hires to corporate boards in California still mostly white, despite state law"

02/23/2021

San Francisco Chronicle & Laredo Morning Times featured Haub Law Professor Darren Rosenblum in "New hires to corporate boards in California still mostly white, despite state law"

That relatively small number of Latinx hires illustrates how mandating diversity does not mean all groups will see representation in boardrooms increase equally because of the new law. That could build pressure to increase the representation of more specific groups on future boards said Darren Rosenblum, a law professor at Pace University School of Law who has studied board diversity.

Read the full San Francisco Chronicle & Laredo Morning Times article.

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FingerLakes1 featured Haub Law Professor Nicholas Robinson in "Will New Yorkers have a constitutional right to clean water and air? Voters will decide this year"

02/19/2021

FingerLakes1 featured Haub Law Professor Nicholas Robinson in "Will New Yorkers have a constitutional right to clean water and air? Voters will decide this year"

New Yorkers will vote in November on whether to add the “right to clean air and water and a healthful environment” to the state constitution, joining a nationwide “Green Amendment” movement. Nicholas A. Robinson, professor emeritus at Pace University, has argued that New York once led the nation in environmental conservation but has slipped markedly in recent years.“New Yorkers suffer today from a deficit of environmental justice,” Robinson wrote in a 2017 article calling for a constitutional convention to deal with the problem. A former general counsel at the state Department of Environmental Conservation, Robinson noted sharp cutbacks in DEC funding in the past decade that “effectively nullify the guarantees in New York’s Environmental Conservation Law.” He cited contamination of drinking water in Hoosick Falls as a prime example of the regulatory breakdown. “Since 2014, (Hoosick Falls residents) have had to drink, bathe in, and cook with water laced with toxic perfluoctanoic acid (PFOA), long before New York’s government acted to protect them.” The Cuomo Administration eventually responded by setting limits on PFOA and PFOS that are among the strictest in the country. But those regulations are only beginning to be enforced on local water systems across the state. “Proverbially, don’t we all live in Hoosick Falls?” Robinson mused in his 2017 article.

Read the full FingerLakes1 article.

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NBC News featured Haub Law Professor Randolph McLaughlin in "How the 1871 Ku Klux Klan Act is being used in this latest Trump lawsuit"

02/18/2021

NBC News featured Haub Law Professor Randolph McLaughlin in "How the 1871 Ku Klux Klan Act is being used in this latest Trump lawsuit"

“This statute was intended to give African Americans and those who supported the freedom efforts a federal cause of action, a right to a lawsuit for the deprivation of rights protected by the statute," said McLaughlin, now a professor at Pace University School of Law and co-chair of Newman Ferrara, a New York-based litigation firm. "I do believe that this statute is perfectly fitted to deal with the problems that were exhibited on Jan. 6, and before Jan. 6, and will be inflicted on the community after Jan. 6. I’m thrilled that my colleagues at the NAACP have taken this up, because if we don’t do something this will happen again or worse. I think this is a wonderful, wonderful opportunity for lawyers to be creative, get some justice, and shut down neo-fascism.”

Read the full NBC News article.

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EurekaAlert featured International Law Professor Benjamin Ferencz in "Prosecutor of the Nuremberg trials receives honorary doctoral degree at Cologne"

02/17/2021

EurekaAlert featured International Law Professor Benjamin Ferencz in "Prosecutor of the Nuremberg trials receives honorary doctoral degree at Cologne"

Benjamin Ferencz, Professor of International Law at Pace University (New York), has received the Honorary Doctor's Degree from the Faculty of Law of the University of Cologne. In order to celebrate the occasion, a ceremony was held honouring the life and work of the renowned practitioner and scholar of international law.

Professor Ferencz was an investigator of Nazi war crimes after World War II and served as the chief prosecutor for the United States Army at the Einsatzgruppen Trial. He later became one of those scholars who made a decisive contribution to the establishment of the International Criminal Court.  

Read the full EurekaAlert article.