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News12 featured Haub Law Professor Bennett Gershman in "Power & Politics: Full show for April 25, 2021"

04/28/2021

News12 featured Haub Law Professor Bennett Gershman in "Power & Politics: Full show for April 25, 2021"

This week on Power & Politics, Scott McGee is joined by NAACP Regional Director Wilbur Aldridge, Pace University Law Professor Bennett Gershman and Yonkers PBA Union President Keith Olsen to discuss the verdict in the Derek Chauvin trial.

Watch the News12 clip.

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News 12 featured Haub Law Professor Bennett Gershman in "After the Verdict: Reaction in the Hudson Valley - and what comes next"

04/22/2021

News 12 featured Haub Law Professor Bennett Gershman in "After the Verdict: Reaction in the Hudson Valley - and what comes next"

What comes next after the Derek Chauvin verdict? Experts and residents outline their predictions and hopes for community relations with police. Guests include Pace Law Professor Bennett Gershman, NAACP Regional Director Wilbur Aldridge and Yonkers PBA Union President Keith Olsen.

Watch the News12 clip.

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Law.com featured Haub Law Professor Bennett Gershman in "'Justice Was Done': NY Legal Community Reacts to Murder Conviction for Derek Chauvin"

04/22/2021

Law.com featured Haub Law Professor Bennett Gershman in "'Justice Was Done': NY Legal Community Reacts to Murder Conviction for Derek Chauvin"

Bennett Gershman, a professor at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law at Pace University and a former prosecutor, told the Law Journal that “justice was done” in Chauvin’s four-week trial, but that relief over a guilty verdict should be tempered by the fact that racial disparities remain entrenched in law enforcement practices and the courts.

“There’s a great deal of relief and a sense that the system worked in this case,” Gershman said. “The system worked. But we know that the system doesn’t work in so many other cases.”

Read the full Law.com article.

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The Journal News featured executive director of Pace’s Energy and Climate Center Craig Hart in the op-ed "Earth Day: To achieve our clean energy goals, the private sector must commit | Opinion"

04/21/2021

The Journal News featured executive director of Pace’s Energy and Climate Center Craig Hart in the op-ed "Earth Day: To achieve our clean energy goals, the private sector must commit | Opinion"

The first Earth Day was April 22, 1970.  Considered a marker for the modern environmental movement, it was born of a bipartisan effort between a Democratic Senator from Wisconsin, a Republican Congressman from California and a small cohort of student activists. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency did not yet exist.  Neither did any of the laws or international treaties that now make up the canon of environmental protection. Craig Hart is the executive director of the Pace University Energy and Climate Center.  Michael N. Romita is the president and CEO of the Westchester County Association and a former environmental litigator with the U.S. Dept. of Justice.

Read the full Journal News article.

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Westchester and Fairfield County Business Journal featured Haub Law Professor Katrina Kuh's co-authored op-ed with Haub Law graduate Maya Van Rossu "For businesses, Green Amendment is double green"

04/20/2021

Westchester and Fairfield County Business Journal featured Haub Law Professor Katrina Kuh's co-authored op-ed with Haub Law graduate Maya Van Rossu "For businesses, Green Amendment is double green"

In April 2019 and again in early 2021, the New York State Assembly and the New York State Senate passed legislation to place a constitutional amendment measure, the Green Amendment, on the ballot in November 2021. Voters will be asked whether to amend the New York State Constitution to provide in Section 19, Article I: “Environmental rights. Each person shall have a right to clean air and water, and a healthful environment.”

As occupants of the state, New York businesses will benefit from passage of the amendment. The Green Amendment could benefit businesses by reducing litigation risk, improving the overall resilience and health of communities and fostering conditions that support the development of forward-looking green industries in New York. Additionally, businesses who advocate for adoption of the Green Amendment can, in doing so, communicate their commitment to a sustainable future to their customers, employees and local communities. For businesses, the Green Amendment is double green – good for the environment and good for the bottom line.

The Green Amendment can reduce litigation risk by preventing situations where businesses inadvertently cause or contribute to environmental damages that might later become the basis for an action seeking damages under existing tort, nuisance or other law because existing statutes and regulations are not adequately protective. Consistent with the interpretation of similar constitutional provisions in New York, the Green Amendment would likely not be enforceable directly against private parties; it is instead a limitation on government action.

Read the full Westchester and Fairfield County Business Journal article.

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