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Pforzheimer Honors College

Courses and Course Schedules


Fall 2017 Honors College Courses

CIS 102T- Intergenerational Computing, 3 credits, CRN 71402
Professor Jean Coppola
Monday 1:20-3:20
Attributes: AOK 1
Course Description: This course is designed to teach students the fundamentals of the PC and digital media technologies as well as the social and sociological aspects of the aging process. Students will work in teams visiting elderly seniors in adult day care centers and senior community centers to teach them to utilize digital media devices, web browsers, and email. This will provide students with an in-depth understanding and respect of both senior citizens and intergenerational computing.

COM 200- Public Speaking, 3 credits, CRN 70562
Professor Samantha Clarke
Wednesday 6:10-9
Attribute: Foundation
Course Description: The course is devoted to instruction in the mechanics of writing and presenting one's own material. This will include such things as the following: outlining, addressing varied audiences, styles, and appropriate techniques of delivery, as well as the use of technology to enhance one's presentation. It is a pragmatic, skills-oriented course designed to provide a context for practicing the construction and presentation of well-reasoned public messages.

CRJ 305- Criminal Law, 3 credits, CRN 70558
Professor Maryellen Martirano
Wednesday 6:10-9pm
Attribute: N/A
Course Description: History and development of common and statutory criminal law. Examination of proscribed behavior subject to penal sanctions; capacity, culpability and defenses. Classification of crimes and analysis of specific crimes. Study of constitutional limitations on legislative definition of criminal conduct and on police procedures.

ENG 120-Critical Writing, 4 credits, CRN 70486
Professor Laurie McMillian
Tuesday and Thursday 10:05-12:05
Attributes: Foundation
Course Description: This course will emphasize the development of argument and analysis as students work with a variety of literary and non-fiction texts. Students will learn more advanced research skills, including methods of documentation, the use of library and Internet resources and the synthesis and integration of primary and secondary sources into their own essays

HON 393, Honors Internship, 0 credits, CRN 73728
Course Description: Students from all majors are part of the Pforzheimer Honors College, and therefore internships will be pursued in a wide range of fields. In order for a student to earn Honor credit for an internship, s/he must place the experiential learning into the context of the course of study and the Honors course completed if they are relevant to the internship by writing a paper of 8-10 pages submitted to the Dean of the Honors College. Must be sophomore standing and receive approval before registering. Please contact Susan Dinan or Kellie VanWort.

HON 499- Research Methods, 1 credit, CRN 71739
Professor Shobana Musti
Tuesday 12:15-1:10
Attributes: Honors requirement
Course Description: This course is designed to assist Honors seniors with the formulation of a thesis project by preparing them in the research methods needed to successfully produce a completed project. Students will be expected to produce a thesis proposal as well as a significant portion of the project itself. A grade of Pass/Fail will be given in the course

MGT 490- Business Strategy, 3 credits, CRN 70744
Professor Theresa Lant
Monday and Wednesday 9-10:15
Attribute: Business Core
Course Description: This is an advanced course in management and should be taken as a capstone course during the student's senior year. Utilizing the case approach and an Internet-based business simulation, the student will be required to apply all the concepts of management, accounting, production, marketing, economics, and finance. The course covers a large number of companies engaged in a wide variety of strategic activities. Emphasis is placed on policy formulation, top management decision-making, and the integration of corporate, business-unit and department strategy programs.

PSY 112- Introduction to Psychology, 4 credits, CRN 72882
Professor Terence Hines
Monday and Wednesday 1:20-3:20
Attribute: AOK 5
Course Description: This course introduces the student to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Modern psychology is broad in scope and rich in detail. The topics in this course have been chosen to provide a representative sample of important areas of active interest in psychology today. Topics include: introduction and research methods, neurosciences and biological foundations, sensation and perception, learning, memory, life span development, motivation and emotion, personality, psychological disorders, therapy, and social psychology

PSY 256- Psychology of Personal Adjustment, 3 credits, CRN 73784
Professor Sara Juncaj
Monday and Wednesday- 2:55-4:20.
Attribute: AOK 5
Course Description: An experiential and cognitive study of personal adjustment. Students participate in a series of exercises and group discussions designed to help the student better understand his or her own adjustment to situations, as well as to learn general principles of personal and interpersonal functioning.

RES 242- The Divine Comedy of Dante, 3 credits, CRN 73633
Professor Lawrence Hundersmarck
Wednesday 5:40-8:30pm
Attribute: AOK 2
Course Description: This course is a study of the Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) with an eye to its major philosophic and religious ideas. As Dante travels through the realms of Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven, the Commedia integrates into its verses the intellectual traditions of Classical Greek, Biblical, and Medieval Philosophical thought. These traditions will be considered in order to understand the work’s essential claims regarding the Divine, the human, the nature of virtue and vice, and the meaning, purpose, and order of existence.

TCH 475- Special Education in Secondary Setting, 3 credits, CRN 70668
Professor
Wednesday 1:20-4:20
Attributes: N/A
Course Description: This course will provide an overview of the laws, available services, and research based practices for successfully serving adolescents (grades 7-12) with a range of special needs. The course will emphasize teaching adolescents in inclusive settings. Field-based observations of middle and high school students in various settings will be required.


First-Year Classes - Required for all Freshmen

PHI 110- Philosophical Problems, 3 credits, CRN 72755
Professor Lawrence Hundersmarck
Thursday 12:15-3:15pm
Attributes: AOK 2 or AOK 5
Course Description: An examination of some of the major philosophical problems, and an introduction to some of the great figures in the history of philosophy. The emphasis will vary from semester to semester, but the course will generally focus on questions concerning the sources of knowledge, the meaning of moral and other value judgments, the nature of the human mind, the justifications for political authority, and the intellectual presuppositions of religious belief. Students are required to register for PHI 115 in the Spring.

PHI 110- Philosophical Problems, 3 credits, CRN 70867
Professor Lawrence Hundersmarck
Wednesday 1:20-4:20pm
Attributes: AOK 2 or 5
Course Descriptions: An examination of some of the major philosophical problems, and an introduction to some of the great figures in the history of philosophy. The emphasis will vary from semester to semester, but the course will generally focus on questions concerning the sources of knowledge, the meaning of moral and other value judgments, the nature of the human mind, the justifications for political authority, and the intellectual presuppositions of religious belief. Students are required to register for PHI 115 in the Spring.

UNV 101- First Year Seminar, 1 credit, CRN 72213
Professor Shobana Musti
Friday 9-10:25am
Attributes: Foundation
Course Description: This course will explore the unique aspects of university life by engaging the student in personal discovery through readings, writing and discussion. In addition to the classroom hours, students will participate in co-curricular experiences and civic engagement opportunities.

UNV 101- First Year Seminar, 1 credit, CRN 71586
Professor Susan Dinan
Tuesday 9-10:25am
Attributes: Foundation
Course Description: This course will explore the unique aspects of university life by engaging the student in personal discovery through readings, writing and discussion. In addition to the classroom hours, students will participate in co-curricular experiences and civic engagement opportunities.


Learning Community: Identity and History in Twentieth- Century Europe, 6 credits

HIS 207- Europe Since World War 1, 3 credits, CRN 72326
Professor Jared Manasek
Monday and Wednesday- 10:35-12
Attributes: AOK 2, LC
Course Description: This course examines the European nations and cultures which came out of the first World War, including: the emergence and growth of conflicting ideologies during the 1920's and 1930's; Modernism and mass culture; the great depression, the rise of fascism and the breakdown of international order; World War II and the Holocaust; existentialism and other intellectual and artistic movements; Europe and the cold war; decolonialization; the feminist and student movements of the 1960's; the creation of the common market; the growth of the welfare state and its dismantling; and the collapse of the Soviet Union.

WS 266- Gender, Race, and Class, 3 credits, CRN 72838
Professor Laurie McMillan
Tuesday and Thursday 4:35-6
Attributes: AOK 3 or AOK 5, Writing Enhanced, LC
Course Description: This course examines the interdependence of the categories gender, race and class in world history and literature, in recent cultural theory, and in contemporary lives. It considers both cultural and political conflicts that arise from the postcolonial global landscape and the oppression of marginalized peoples and analyzes how gender, race, and class roles are constructed, negotiated, and manipulated through literature and other media.

LC Description: This learning community uses the study of gender, race, and class to shed light on the major historical developments of Europe’s twentieth century. The learning community starts with the end of World War I and continues through the rise of communism and fascism, World War II, the Cold War, decolonization, and the establishment of the European Union. Working with relevant writing and other cultural production, students will explore questions of gender, race, and class in twentieth-century Europe. By examining how these identities and categories were constructed, negotiated, and manipulated, the learning community will help students understand the central role identity plays in historical change.​


Learning Community: Managing Legal and Ethical Business Challenges (6 credits)

LAW 101- Business Law, 3 credits, CRN 70005
Professor Joseph DiBenedetto
Monday and Wednesday- 9-10:25
Attributes: Business Core, LC
Course Description: An introduction to the nature and sources of law; the role of ethics in the legal system; the law of torts and crimes; the law of contracts; and real and personal property law

PHI 121- Ethics in the Workplace, 3 credits, CRN 71352
Professor Everette Mitchell
Monday and Wednesday- 10:35-12
Attributes: AOK 5, LC
Course Description: This course offers a survey of some of the key issues that face the whole range of corporate stakeholders, from shareholders to the general public. We begin with two classical ethical theories, utilitarianism and deontological ethical theory, and with the relationship between justice and the market system. We continue with ethical issues involving the relationship between the employee and the company, such as whistle-blowing; discrimination, affirmative action, sexual harassment; issues involving the consumer and employee protection, such as product and occupational safety; and finally issues of the relationship between the corporation and society, such as corporate responsibility.

LC Description: This course considers how the classical tradition in philosophical ethics and Anglo-American common law have developed to address business issues, and whether our legal system now fosters a marketplace, as well as a workplace, that is both legal and ethical. Students apply principles of ethics and law to aspects of contemporary commerce.


Learning Community: Building and Sustaining Business Relationships Through Communication (6 credits) For Lubin Students

ENG 201- Writing in the Disciplines, 3 credits, CRN 71334
Professor Heather Bryant
Monday and Wednesday 10:35-12pm
Attribute: Foundation class, LC
Course Description: This course is an upper-level writing requirement. Its focus will be on writing effective essays and research papers in disciplinary modes and in students' field of interest. It may include interviews, analysis of journal articles, and appropriate documentation style formats.

MAR 250- Principles of Marketing, 3 credits, CRN 71333
Professor Karen Berger
Monday and Wednesday 9-10:25am
Attributes: Business Core, Writing Enhanced, LC Course Description: Introduction to the complex and dynamic field of marketing and its systems. This course examines marketing's place in the firm and in society. Considered and analyzed are marketing research and strategies for product development, pricing, physical distribution and promotion, including personal selling, advertising, sales promotion and public relations.

LC Description: Communication skills are essential to creating customer relationships and value. Using case studies, students will analyze current marketing practices and related issues. In addition, students will learn how to develop a marketing plan using research and writing skills and will undertake other forms of business communication.


Travel Course

HIS - The Building of England, 3 credits, CRN 73734
Professor Susan Dinan
Attributes: AOK 2
Study Abroad Dates: 8/20/2017-9/02/2017
Program Fee: $3,700
Description: This course is a broad analysis of Tudor history, 1485-1603. The objective is to understand how in a century of radical political and religious events transformed the social, political, and religious structures of England, giving birth to the foundation of England as a united kingdom, and a significant world power. This course focuses on the Tudors, especially Henry VIII and Elizabeth I, the English Reformation, and the creation of the Anglican Church. The course is taught in London so we can learn from books and documents, but also from site visits that will include Windsor Palace, Westminster Abbey, Hampton Court Palace, the Tower of London, the National Portrait Gallery, Oxford University, Hatfield House, the Houses of Parliament, and the Globe Theater. Each day will begin with a class discussion of the assigned sources, and a brief lecture discussing the place of the day’s site visit. The bulk of the day will be spent in locations significant in Tudor history.


Consider for an Honors option:

HIS 297Q-Empire Falls: Ottomans, Europe and Making the Middle East, CRN 73720
Professor Jared Manasek
Monday and Wednesday 1:20-2:45
Attribute: AOK 3
Course Description: This course examines the last century of the Ottoman Empire, one of history’s longest-lasting, and its eventual fragmentation into new countries and polities across South-Eastern Europe and the Middle East. In doing so, the course encourages students to think critically about the “decline” of empires, and will help them better understand the foundations of the Middle East in the 20th Century. Exploring the domestic obstacles and external pressure of Europe’s great imperial powers that increasingly hampered the Ottoman government, the course will survey Ottoman efforts to reform, adapt, and modernize. It will look at the constitutional structure of the late empire, examine its borderlands, compare the Balkan and Arab provinces, and how the empire tried to manage new challenges from refugees, nomads, and emerging nationalist movements. The course will outline the transition from empire to nation-state in the case of the Turkish Republic and the European Balkan states, and from empire to European mandates in the case of the Arab provinces. After discussing the violence of imperial collapse during World War I, the course will look at the legacies of the Ottoman Empire in the Balkans, Anatolia, and the Arab provinces.