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Pforzheimer Honors College

Courses and Course Schedules


Fall 2018 Honors Courses

COM 200- Public Speaking, 3 credits, CRN 73606
Instructor: Kevin Czerwinski
Friday 9:00am-12:00pm
Attribute: Foundation

Course Description: The course is devoted to instruction in the mechanics of writing and presenting one's own material. This will include such things as the following: outlining, addressing varied audiences, styles, and appropriate techniques of delivery, as well as the use of technology to enhance one's presentation. It is a pragmatic, skills-oriented course designed to provide a context for practicing the construction and presentation of well-reasoned public messages.

ENG 120- Critical Writing, 4 credits, CRN 70422
Instructor TBA
Tuesday and Thursday 10:05-12:05
Attributes: Foundation

Course Description: This course will emphasize the development of argument and analysis as students work with a variety of literary and non-fiction texts. Students will learn more advanced research skills, including methods of documentation, the use of library and Internet resources and the synthesis and integration of primary and secondary sources into their own essays

ENG 201- Writing in the Disciplines, 3 credits, CRN 71208
Instructor TBA
Monday and Wednesday 10:35am-12:00pm
Attribute: Foundation
Prerequisites: ENG 120, completion of 45 credits

Course Description: This course is an upper-level writing requirement. Its focus will be on writing effective essays and research papers in disciplinary modes and in students' field of interest. It may include interviews, analysis of journal articles, and appropriate documentation style formats.

RES 244- The Four Gospels of the New Testament, 3 credits, CRN TBA
Professor Lawrence Hundersmarck
Wednesday 5:40-8:30pm
Attribute: AOK 2

Course Description: This is a course that seeks to examine what modern scholars have claimed about the sources, audiences and conceptual contexts of the four Gospels. The aim of the course is to study what the authors of the Gospels believe about Jesus and the diverse ways in which they have articulated that belief. This is a course that will teach you how to read complex and immensely interesting texts with a very high level of sophistication. The goal of the course is to understand four documents that have influenced billions throughout history as the essential source for Christianity.

FSS 206- Histoy of Film II: WWII-Present, 3 credits, CRN 72847
Professor Rebecca Martin
Monday 6:10-9:00pm
Attributes: AOK4
Prerequisite: ENG 120

Course Description: This course will investigate the main trends in world cinema since World War II. The course will use a number of case studies on national cinemas to explore how new aesthetics, technologies, ideological perspectives, and modes of production and reception have reshaped and enriched storytelling in narrative feature films. Of particular interest will be the ways the new cinemas challenge and alter the paradigm of the classical Hollywood genres as developed and practiced by the American studios in the 1930’s and 1940's.

LIT 211J- American Voices, 3 credits
Professor Ama Wattley
Monday and Wednesday 10:35am-12:00pm
Attributes: AOK2 or AOK4
Prerequisite: ENG 120

Course Description: A study of American ethnic literature from the Latino community: these ethnic Americans write about their personal journeys in trying to fit into the U.S., as immigrants. The course will explore and introduce immigration studies in order to better comprehend the novel, short story or poem written by authors who have encountered different issues on their way to becoming Americans. The universal appeal of ethnic literature is coupled with many kinds of migratory issues.

PSY 112- Introduction to Psychology, 4 credits, CRN 72485
Professor Terrence Hines
Monday and Wednesday 1:20-3:20pm
Attribute: AOK5

Course Description: This course introduces the student to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Modern psychology is broad in scope and rich in detail. The topics in this course have been chosen to provide a representative sample of important areas of active interest in psychology today. Topics include: introduction and research methods, neurosciences and biological foundations, sensation and perception, learning, memory, life span development, motivation and emotion, personality, psychological disorders, therapy, and social psychology.

PSY 201- Psychology of Business and Industry, 3 credits, CRN TBA
Professor Sara Juncaj
Monday and Wednesday- 2:55-4:20pm
Attribute: N/A

Course Description: The psychological principles and techniques involved in the management of personnel in business and industry. The topics included are hiring techniques, job analysis, training performance appraisal, communications, fatigue, safety, morale and industrial leadership.

HW 170- Myofascial Anatomy for Movement and Sports Training, CRN 73911
Instructor TBA
Tuesday 9:00am-12:00pm
Attribute: AOK5

Course Description: This innovative course will combine traditional lecture as well as experiential movement in deepening an understanding of myofascial anatomy and its relevance in movement and sports training. Individual and group responses to the course content will be an important part of this class. The course will begin with a section on yoga and practice, followed by athletic movement and training techniques. We will also be exploring anatomy throughout the class as a common language for understanding these disciplines as well as discussing recent developments in anatomy based on new ways of perceiving movement.

CRJ 305- Criminal Law, 3 credits, CRN 70487
Professor Maryellen Martirano
Wednesday 6:10-9:00pm
Attribute: N/A
Restrictions: Must be a Junior or Senior to register, or ask an advisor for permission

Course Description: History and development of common and statutory criminal law. Examination of proscribed behavior subject to penal sanctions; capacity, culpability and defenses. Classification of crimes and analysis of specific crimes. Study of constitutional limitations on legislative definition of criminal conduct and on police procedures.

LAW 101- Business Law, 3 credits, CRN 70005
Instructor TBA
Monday and Wednesday- 9:00-10:25am
Attributes: Business Core

Course Description: An introduction to the nature and sources of law; the role of ethics in the legal system; the law of torts and crimes; the law of contracts; and real and personal property law.

MAR 201- Principles of Marketing, 3 credits, CRN 72909
Instructor TBA
Tuesday and Thursday 9:00-10:25am
Attributes: Business Core, Writing-Enhanced
Prerequisite: completion of 45 credits

Course Description: Introduction to the complex and dynamic field of marketing and its systems. This course examines marketing's place in the firm and in society. Considered and analyzed are marketing research and strategies for product development, pricing, physical distribution and promotion, including personal selling, advertising, sales promotion and public relations.

MGT 490- Business Strategy, 3 credits, CRN 70658
Professor Theresa Lant
Monday and Wednesday 9:00-10:15am
Attribute: Business Core
Prerequisites: FIN 260, MAR 201, MGT 226

Course Description: This is an advanced course in management and should be taken as a capstone course during the student's senior year. Utilizing the case approach and an Internet-based business simulation, the student will be required to apply all the concepts of management, accounting, production, marketing, economics, and finance. The course covers a large number of companies engaged in a wide variety of strategic activities. Emphasis is placed on policy formulation, top management decision-making, and the integration of corporate, business-unit and department strategy programs.

HON 499- Research Methods, 1 credit, CRN 71571
Professor Shobana Musti
Tuesday 12:15-1:10
Attributes: Honors requirement for thesis (if no department equivalent offered)

Course Description: This course is designed to assist Honors seniors with the formulation of a thesis project by preparing them in the research methods needed to successfully produce a completed project. Students will be expected to produce a thesis proposal as well as a significant portion of the project itself. A grade of Pass/Fail will be given in the course

HON 393- Honors Internship, 0 credits, CRN 73090
Must receive permission from the Dean of the Pforzheimer Honors College
Course Description: Students from all majors are part of the Pforzheimer Honors College, and therefore internships will be pursued in a wide range of fields. In order for a student to earn Honor credit for an internship, s/he must place the experiential learning into the context of the course of study and the Honors course completed if they are relevant to the internship by writing a paper of 8-10 pages submitted to the Dean of the Honors College.


Travel Courses

HIS 201- The Building of England, 3 credits, CRN 73095
Professor Susan Dinan
Attributes: AOK 2, Travel Course
Study Abroad Dates: 8/19/2018-9/01/2018
Program Fee: $3,700

Course Description: This course is a broad analysis of Tudor history, 1485-1603. The objective is to understand how in a century of radical political and religious events transformed the social, political, and religious structures of England, giving birth to the foundation of England as a united kingdom, and a significant world power. This course focuses on the Tudors, especially Henry VIII and Elizabeth I, the English Reformation, and the creation of the Anglican Church. The course is taught in London so we can learn from books and documents, but also from site visits that will include Windsor Palace, Westminster Abbey, Hampton Court Palace, the Tower of London, the National Portrait Gallery, Oxford University, Hatfield House, the Houses of Parliament, and the Globe Theater. Each day will begin with a class discussion of the assigned sources, and a brief lecture discussing the place of the day’s site visit. The bulk of the day will be spent in locations significant in Tudor history.

EDU 296Q- Following the Footsteps of Early Educational Thinkers: Italy, CRN 73095
Professors Xiao-lei Wang & Brian Evans
Attributes: Travel Course
Study Abroad Dates: 1/2/2019-1/18/2019

Course Description: This study abroad seminar series follows the footsteps of early European educational thinkers by exploring their educational philosophies in the European context. It focuses on the Roman-Italian educational thinkers (such as Marcus Tullius Cicero, Marcus Fabius Quintilianus, Pietro Paolo Vergerio-the Elder, and Maria Montessori), educational approaches (such as Reggio Emilia), and examines how the Italian educational thinking and approaches have influenced the educational practices in the United States. Participants will visit Italian cultural relics, listen to lectures provided by Italian educational experts, and visit Italian schools. Participants will also have opportunity to reflect on their experience and relate it to their future teaching or career. The seminar is open to Pace School of Education undergraduate and graduate students as well as all other Pace University students.


Learning Community: Identity and History in Twentieth-Century Europe

HIS 207- Europe Since World War 1, 3 credits, CRN 72060
Professor Jared Manasek
Monday and Wednesday- 10:35am-12:00pm
Attributes: AOK 2, LC

Course Description: This course examines the European nations and cultures which came out of the first World War, including: the emergence and growth of conflicting ideologies during the 1920's and 1930's; Modernism and mass culture; the great depression, the rise of fascism and the breakdown of international order; World War II and the Holocaust; existentialism and other intellectual and artistic movements; Europe and the cold war; decolonialization; the feminist and student movements of the 1960's; the creation of the common market; the growth of the welfare state and its dismantling; and the collapse of the Soviet Union.

WS 166- Gender, Race, and Class, 3 credits, CRN 73671
Professor Laurie McMillan
Tuesday and Thursday 4:35-6
Attributes: AOK 3 or AOK 5, Writing-Enhanced, LC

Course Description: This course examines the complex intersections of gender, race/ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation, among other vectors of diversity in the United States, as well as globally. It offers sociological perspectives on a number of issues ranging from social inequalities – such as the mass incarceration of African American men – to basic -isms – such as sexism, racism, classism, or ableism – to relative privileges and disadvantages that we all have – such as wealth disparities and their health and educational consequences. In particular, the course chronicles the lived experiences of women around the world from an anthropological/cultural perspective – such as female genital circumcision, sexual exploitation, and women’s ever-changing roles at home and in the labor force.

LEARNING COMMUNITY SUMMARY: This learning community uses the study of gender, race, and class to shed light on the major historical developments of Europe’s twentieth century. The learning community starts with the end of World War I and continues through the rise of communism and fascism, World War II, the Cold War, decolonization, and the establishment of the European Union. Working with relevant writing and other cultural production, students will explore questions of gender, race, and class in twentieth-century Europe. By examining how these identities and categories were constructed, negotiated, and manipulated, the learning community will help students understand the central role identity plays in historical change.


Open Only to First-Year Students

PHI 110- Philosophical Problems, 3 credits, CRN 72410
Required for all freshmen
Professor Lawrence Hundersmarck
Thursday 12:15-3:15pm
Attributes: AOK 2 or AOK 5

Course Description: An examination of some of the major philosophical problems, and an introduction to some of the great figures in the history of philosophy. The emphasis will vary from semester to semester, but the course will generally focus on questions concerning the sources of knowledge, the meaning of moral and other value judgments, the nature of the human mind, the justifications for political authority, and the intellectual presuppositions of religious belief. Students are required to register for PHI 115 in the Spring.

PHI 110- Philosophical Problems, 3 credits, CRN 70775
Required for all freshmen
Professor Lawrence Hundersmarck
Wednesday 1:20-4:20pm
Attributes: AOK 2 or 5

Course Descriptions: An examination of some of the major philosophical problems, and an introduction to some of the great figures in the history of philosophy. The emphasis will vary from semester to semester, but the course will generally focus on questions concerning the sources of knowledge, the meaning of moral and other value judgments, the nature of the human mind, the justifications for political authority, and the intellectual presuppositions of religious belief. Students are required to register for PHI 115 in the Spring.

UNV 101- First Year Seminar, 1 credit, CRN 71963
Professor Shobana Musti
Friday 9:00-10:25am
Attributes: Foundation

Course Description: This course will explore the unique aspects of university life by engaging the student in personal discovery through readings, writing and discussion. In addition to the classroom hours, students will participate in co-curricular experiences and civic engagement opportunities.

UNV 101- First Year Seminar, 1 credit, CRN TBA
Professor Susan Dinan
Monday 9:00-10:25am
Attributes: Foundation

Course Description: This course will explore the unique aspects of university life by engaging the student in personal discovery through readings, writing and discussion. In addition to the classroom hours, students will participate in co-curricular experiences and civic engagement opportunities.