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Pforzheimer Honors College

Courses and Course Schedules

Fall 2015 Honors Classes


Spring 2016 Honors College Courses

ART 103, Art History: Renaissance through Modern Art, 3 credits, CRN 23422

Professor: Janetta Benton
Day: Tuesday 12:15-3:15pm
Fulfills: AOK 2 or 4

Course Description: Second half of a year-long introductory survey of the major monuments of western art from the Renaissance to the twenty-first century. Works of painting, sculpture, and architecture are studied within their historical contexts. The class may visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Students may be required to cover museum admission fees.


CIS 102T, Intergenerational Computing, 3 credits, CRN 20624

Professor: Jean Coppola
Day: Monday 1:20-3:20
Fulfills: AOK 1

Prerequisite: CIS 101 or INT 197B (Grade D or higher)

Course Description: This course is designed to teach students the fundamentals of the PC and digital media technologies as well as the social and sociological aspects of the aging process. Students will work in teams visiting elderly seniors in adult day care centers and senior community centers to teach them to utilize digital media devices, web browsers, and email. This will provide students with an in-depth understanding and respect of both senior citizens and intergenerational computing.


CRJ 351, Criminal Evidence and Procedure, 3 credits, CRN 21627

Professor: Maryellen Martirano
Day: Tuesdays 12:15-3:15
Fulfills: N/A
Prerequisite: CRJ 150 (Grade D or higher)

Course Description: Comprehensive analysis of rules of evidence, especially as treated under the Criminal Procedure Law of 1970. Subjects include real and circumstantial evidence, burden of proof, hearsay evidence, confessions, admissions, witnesses' identification, etc., as they relate to criminal cases.


ENG 201, Writing in the Disciplines, 3 credits, CRN 20697

Professor: TBA
Day: Wednesday 6:10-9
Fulfills: Core requirement
Prerequisite: ENG 120 or INT 197T. Upper sophomore standing (45 credits)

Course Description: This course focuses on writing effective essays and research papers in disciplinary modes and in students? fields of interest. Included are interviews, analysis of journal articles, and appropriate documentation style formats. Students work collaboratively, approaching issues from the perspective of their chosen majors.


FIN 260, Financial Management, 3 credits, CRN 20756

Professor: Padmaja Kadiyala
Days: Monday and Wednesday 9-10:25
Fulfills: Business Core
Prerequisite: ECO 106, ACC 203, ACC 204, MAT 104 or MAT 137 or MAT 134 or MAT 234 or MAT 117 (Grade of D or higher)

Course Description: This course introduces students to the financial decisions facing the manager. Topics include: financial analysis of the firm's current and future financial condition; efficient management of the firm's assets; sources of short and long-term financing; introduction to financial theory, including valuation, capital budgeting, leverage, capital structure and the timing of financial decisions.


HIS 114S, Church State and Society, 3 credits, CRN 23475

Professor: Susan Dinan
Days: Tuesday and Thursday 9am - 10:35am
Fulfills: AOK 2, WE

Course Description: This course surveys the history of the Mediterranean region and Europe from ca. 300-1500 C.E. Topics include: the "fall" of the Roman Empire and foundation of Germanic kingdoms in Europe; the emergence of the Byzantine Empire; the rise of Islam; early medieval empires; feudal society; the Crusades; Europe's economic expansion after ca. 1050; cultural life and literature; universities; papal monarchy and religious dissent; and the problems of late Medieval Europe.


HON 499, Research Methods, 1 credit, CRN 22044

Professor: Mohsen Shiri-Garakani
Day: Tuesday 12:15-1:10
Fulfills: Honors requirement

Prerequisite: Second semester sophomore or students in their Junior year

Course Description: This course is designed to assist Honors seniors with the formulation of a thesis project by preparing them in the research methods needed to successfully produce a completed project. Students will be expected to produce a thesis proposal as well as a significant portion of the project itself. A grade of Pass/Fail will be given in the course.


HON 499, Research Methods, 1 credit, CRN 22046

Professor: Melissa Cardon
Day: Wednesday 4:35pm - 5:25pm
Fulfills: Honors/ BHP requirement

Prerequisite: Lubin students only.

Second semester sophomore or students in their junior year.

Course Description: This course is designed to assist Honors seniors with the formulation of a thesis project by preparing them in the research methods needed to successfully produce a completed project. Students will be expected to produce a thesis proposal as well as a significant portion of the project itself. A grade of Pass/Fail will be given in the course.


INT 299N, Environmental Policy Clinic II, 6 credits, CRN 22676

Professor: John Cronin
Days: Tuesday and Thursday 12:15-3:15
Fulfills: AOK 1

Prerequisite: Students must be a sophomore and Instructor Permission is required

Course Description: Students clinicians work as professional practitioners, in a team setting, with faculty from Pace Academy for Applied Environmental Studies and faculty from across Pace schools and colleges. Their primary responsibility is to design and implement policy reforms for real world environmental issues by representing and working with "client," non-profit organizations from the community and region, under the supervision of Pace Academy. Students will also learn the essential civic-engagement skills necessary to serve their clients, such as legal, political and communication skills training, legislative history research, preparation of hearing testimony, oral and written presentations, news release writing, bill drafting, lobbying and its requirements, the role of nonprofits and government, and use of social media and technology-based methods of influencing public opinion


LIT 296B, British Literature and Culture, 3 credits, CRN 23091

Professor: Bette Kirschstein
Days: Tuesday and Thursday 10:35-12
Fulfills: AOK 2 or 4, WE

Course Description: Great Britain is a county with a rich literary and artistic history. In this course, we will study how the country's arts - literature, painting, architecture, landscape architecture, and music - were shaped by and, in turn, reflected the country's history and culture. Using the arts as a mirror, we will see how the eighteenth-century Industrial Revolution changed Great Britain from a rural, agricultural society to an increasingly urban, wealthy, socially mobile, technological one. We will watch the rise and fall of the global British Empire. Changing gender roles will be examined, along with the many other social changes that occurred as Great Britain transformed itself into a modern society. Writers to be studied include Wordsworth, Blake, Austen, Tennyson, Kipling, Wilde, and Woolf.


MGT 250, Managerial and Organizational Concepts, 3 credits, CRN 21195

Professor: Melissa Cardon
Day: Tuesday and Thursday 12:15-1:40
Fulfills: Business Core

Prerequisite: Completion of 48 credits

Course Description: This course examines basic managerial functions of planning, organizing, motivating, leading, and controlling. Emphasis is also given to the behavior of individual and groups within organizations.


PSY 233, Psychology of Civic Engagement, 3 credits, CRN 20803

Professor: Elizabeth Tesoriero
Day: Thursday 5:40-8:30
Fulfills: AOK 1, Inquiry and Exploration

Course Description: This course will introduce you to the application of psychology principles to a variety of social service setting. A strong emphasis on civic engagement will be featured.


PSY 240, Positive Psychology and Happiness, 3 credits, CRN 23138

Professor: Paul Griffin
Day: Tuesday and Thursday 10:35-12
Fulfills: AOK 5 and WE

Course Description: This course will be devoted to a particular domain of research and clinical application, known as "positive psychology." In short, this class is about what psychology has learned about happiness and optimal human functioning. During the semester a number of different topics will be addressed, including: (1) identifying the goals and subject matter of positive psychology; (2) reviewing and critically examining theoretical perspectives and (most importantly) empirical findings on what predicts human happiness, from the biological to the environmental; (3) moving beyond what makes us happy and studying other aspects of the "good life," such as signature strengths, purpose in life, gratitude, and acts of kindness; and (4) examining whether these theories and findings can be applied to everyday life.


RES 244, Gospels of the New Testament, 3 credits, CRN 23081

Professor: Lawrence Hundersmarck
Day: Wednesday 5:40-8:30
Fulfills: AOK 2

Course Description: This course offers a scholarly introduction to the Gospels of Mark, Matthew, Luke, and John with an approach that seeks to situate these texts within their original historical, literary, and religious contexts. Through a comparison of the four Gospels the themes that distinguish each book regarding its portrait of Jesus and the demands of the Christian life will be studied. Attention to the sources, audiences, the nature of multiple forms of oral communication within the written texts, and the perspective of each author will be emphasized


TCH 201H, Understanding Schools, 4 credits, CRN 21604

Professor:
Day: Tuesday and Thursday 2:25-4:25
Fulfills: AOK 1, WE

Course Description: This course examines schools in a diverse and changing society. By examining the history, philosophy, legal and social responsibilities associated with schooling, you are introduced to the interactions among society, families, schools, curriculum, teachers, students, and cultures. Through guided field experiences, you will observe and reflect on different aspects of schooling with particular focus placed on the role language serves across all interactive domains of society and the role of the teacher as agent of change and empowerment. During this course, you will be challenged to examine the classroom as a diverse community where all participants can learn in a safe and appropriate environment. Professional seminars and field experiences accompany this course. This course is designed to be taken in the fall of the sophomore year. Successful completion of this course (with a grade of B or better) is required of all students seeking formal admission to the School of Education.


HONORS INDEPENDENT RESEARCH COURSES, 3 CREDITS

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing, 3.3 GPA minimum. With the written approval of the appropriate professor, the department chairperson, and the Director of the Honors College, a student may select a topic that is not included in the usual course offerings for guided research. The student meets regularly with the professor to review progress. To receive Honors College credit, the results of this independent research must be presented at the Honors Independent Research Conference held every year at the end of April or beginning of May. Students may have their papers published in Transactions, the scholarly journal of the Dyson Society of Fellows, and also made available through Pace University’s Digital Commons


TRAVEL COURSES

INT 197G, Rome the Eternal City, 6 credits, CRN 20701
Professor: Lawrence Hundersmarck
Fulfills: AOK 2, Learning Community

Corequisite: RES 101 CRN 22405 or 22406

Course Description: Local trips and lectures will take place in Rome. There will be 2 Predate Meeting TBA. Travel dates to Rome: May 19th to June 11th, 2016. Trip Destination: Rome, Italy and day trip to Florence, Trip Cost: $5,100 (includes airfare, lodging, two group banquets, museum entrance fees, insurance, and excursion to Florence.) A $1,000 deposit is due the first week of December. For further information contact either the Office of International Programs & Services or Dr. Lawrence Hundersmarck, Dept. of Philosophy and Religious Studies (lhundersmarck@pace.edu) Please note: After registration for this spring class, students who register will receive, and fill out an application in order to obtain permission from the Instructor to enter the course. A strict limit of 24 students will go to Rome. Students must also register for RES 101 – CRN 22405 or CRN 22406


INT 299T - Montaigne to Beaumarchais: Paris - 6 crs - 23213

T 12:15pm – 3:15pm Brown/Williams

Course Description: In this Learning Community, we will examine French philosophy and literature, beginning with the work of thinkers such as Montaigne and Descartes, who deeply influenced the development of modern science; Moliere whose influence on French culture and on the history of the theatre has been extraordinary, Montesquieu, Voltaire and Rousseau, who were of criterial importance to both the US and French revolutions, and concluding with Beaumarchais, himself a figure in the American revolution, Madame de Stael who coined the term "Romanticism," and Honore Balzac. We will pay particular attention to the social, political and ethical effects on contemporary Paris. INT 299T will contain components of PHI 116 and FRE 155C. This class will be taught using Pace's video conference network, web assisted. It is expected that students have online and in class participation.


HONORS INDEPENDENT RESEARCH COURSES, 3 CREDITS

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing, 3.3 GPA minimum. With the written approval of the appropriate professor, the department chairperson, and the Director of the Honors College, a student may select a topic that is not included in the usual course offerings for guided research. The student meets regularly with the professor to review progress. To receive Honors College credit, the results of this independent research must be presented at the Honors Independent Research Conference held every year at the end of April or beginning of May. Students may have their papers published in Transactions, the scholarly journal of the Dyson Society of Fellows, and also made available through Pace University’s Digital Commons.


HONORS OPTIONS COURSES, 3 CREDITS

Prerequisite: None

The Honors Option is designed for Honors-level work in a non-Honors course. To receive Honors College credit, an additional paper (10-20 pages), project, or presentation is required. Written approval of the appropriate professor and the Director of the Honors College are necessary. Depending upon the number of credits completed prior to entering the Honors College, Honors students are limited to either one or two Honors options; other Honors course requirements must be completed in Honors courses.