graphic of dictionary definition of research representing the Lubin Research Seminar Series
Faculty Resources

Lubin Research Seminar Series

Research does not occur in a vacuum. Learning about other ideas acts as cross-fertilization for one's own ideas. And really revolutionary ideas are generated by listening to developments in related, but different fields.

The Lubin Research Seminar Series brings researchers from various business disciplines to Pace to talk about their work. The goal is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for our faculty to hear and interact with experts in marketing, finance, management, accounting, law, human resources, and other areas in business.

If you have any questions about the seminar series, please contact PV Viswanath at pviswanath@pace.edu or Liora Schulman at lschulman@pace.edu.

Past semesters speakers

Note: Some research papers require Pace University credentials to download.

Spring 2022 Speakers

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    Associate Professor of Management and Management Science Julia Eisenberg

    Julia Eisenberg is an Associate Professor in the Management and Management Science Department. Her research interests include leadership, innovation, knowledge sharing, and collaboration among geographically distributed individuals and teams. Prior to academia, she spent over 10 years in the financial industry, having worked as a product developer and a manager in the technology and the finance divisions. Julia has published articles in journals including the Journal of International Management, Human Resources Management Review Journal, Small Group Research Journal, Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication, and Organizational Management Journal.

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    Columbia University professor Bernard Black

    "The SEC's Short-Sale Experiment: Causal Channels and Specification Choice"

    Bernard Black is Nicholas D. Chabraja Professor at Northwestern University, with positions in the Pritzker School of Law, the Kellogg School of Management, Department of Finance, and the Institute for Policy Research. His research areas include health policy and medical malpractice, empirical methods for causal inference, law and finance, and international corporate governance. Recent book: Medical Malpractice Litigation: How It Works; Why Tort Reform Hasn't Helped (Cato Institute 2021, with David Hyman, Myungho Paik, William Sage, and Charles Silver). He is the founding Chairman of the annual Conference on Empirical Legal Studies (2006-2016), a founding editor of the Journal of Law, Finance and Accounting, and has run, since 2010, an annual summer workshop at Northwestern. He is among the leading empirical legal scholars in the U.S., with over 150 published articles and over 31,000 citations on Google Scholar.

    Paper to be presented

  • Iftekhar Hasan is a faculty member at the Gabelli School of Business of Fordham University. His research interests are in the areas of financial institutions, corporate finance, capital markets, and emerging economies focusing on interdisciplinary questions and public policy issues. He has published extensively in academic journals in several fields. He has been proudly involved in developing scores of Ph.D. students and junior scholars and educators across institutions and countries throughout his career. The above and his humble yet significant ongoing academic involvements globally are hiskey academic achievements and source of contentment as an academic colleague.

    Paper to be presented

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    guest speaker Ted Baker, Professor, Rutgers Business School

    Ted Baker spent the first 20 years of his adult life helping to build a variety of technology-rich entrepreneurial ventures. He holds the George F. Farris Chair in Entrepreneurship at Rutgers Business School, while serving as founding director of the Rutgers Advanced Institute for the Study of Entrepreneurship and Development (RAISED). He also works at the University of Cape Town. Ted's research explores entrepreneurship under conditions of resource constraint and adversity, focusing on sources and patterns of resourceful behavior. His most influential work continues to develop the notion of "entrepreneurial bricolage." His work on Founder Identity Theory (FIT)—with Erin Powell and PhD students in the US, South Korea and South Africa—complements this by drawing on the social psychology of identity to explore entrepreneur's strategic responses to resource constraint and adversity. A series of books and papers with Friederike Welter introduce the Critical Process Approach to contextualizing entrepreneurship research.

    Paper to be presented

    Abstract

    While prior research suggests that entrepreneurial bricolage is often useful as a coping mechanism for resource-constrained new ventures, other accounts document detrimental effects of bricolage. As the conditions for effective bricolage have not been systematically examined in prior research, we develop and test theoretical explanations for some important boundary conditions. We propose that while bricolage has a positive influence through a resource replacement mechanism, it may be detrimental through the intertwined "second-best solutions" and "tinkering trap" which together lead to an accumulation of compromises that may result in a detrimental path dependence. We hypothesize that the intensity of these counteracting mechanisms differs depending on the venture's stage of development (nascent vs. operational) and its level of growth expectations. In essence, we argue that ventures expecting to achieve more derive greater benefit from resource replacement. In addition, they are more likely to resist an accumulation of compromises. We test our hypotheses using a longitudinal study of early-stage ventures. Although the results mostly support our theory, they also point to one interesting surprise for which we extend our theorizing to propose an explanation. Counter to the prevailing view in the literature, we find that bricolage is particularly effective for developing competitiveness for early-stage ventures striving to develop and grow. Complementing this, our results suggest the net effects of bricolage may actually be detrimental to the competitiveness of operational ventures that are not actively trying to grow.

Fall 2021 Speakers

  • "The Effectiveness of Paid Search Advertising"

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    Lubin professor Chongyun Lu

    Chongyu Lu is an Assistant Professor of Marketing at the Lubin School of Business, Pace University. She received her PhD in Marketing from the C.T. Bauer College of Business, University of Houston. Chongyu's current research primarily focuses on digital marketing and marketing analytics. She has publications in Journal of Advertising Research, Journal of Marketing Management, Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, Journal of Marketing Development and Competitiveness, and Journal of Environmental Psychology.

    Papers to be presented

    Abstract

    Paid search advertising is the most prominent form of digital advertising and is expected to reach $211.4 billion in 2025. In this talk, we discuss three of my recent research papers that study the effectiveness of paid search advertising and provide insights into paid search advertising strategies. We firstly discuss differences in consumer click-through behavior with paid search advertisement across devices (smartphone, tablet, and desktop). Then we propose two keyword portfolio characteristics (variety and disparity) and study the effect of portfolio variety and disparity on product sales in both desktop and mobile environment. In addition, we examine how brand keywords affect product sales and how hedonic or utilitarian keywords interact with product type to affect sales. The managerial implications of these research findings are also discussed.

  • "The Blockchain Technology, Sustainable Supply Chain, and Circular Economy Linkage: Practice and Research"

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    Worcester Polytechnic Institute professor Joseph Sarkis

    Joseph Sarkis is a Professor of Management within the Business School at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He earned his PhD from the University of Buffalo. His research and teaching interests include environmental sustainability, technology, operations, and supply chain management. He has authored over 500 publications appearing in a wide variety of outlets. He is currently Editor-in-Chief of IEEE Engineering Management Review and Associate Editor for the journal Resources, Conservation and Recycling on the topic of sustainable supply chains. His editorial positions cover many leading journals in operations, transportation, supply chain, and sustainability management. Joe has been recognized as a Highly Cited Researcher for each year from 2015-2021 by Thomson-Reuters/Clarivate Analytics (Web-of-Science). He is an AT&T Industrial Ecology Fellow and has served as a research scholar at universities throughout the world; he currently holds a position of International Scholar within the Hanken School of Economics' HUMLOG Institute. He is a coordinator within the Future Earth Systems of Sustainable Consumption and Production (SSCP) Knowledge-Action Network in the Circular Economy Working Group. Joe is also an international program coordinator for the Greening of Industry Network (GIN) along with the Greening of Industry Networks book series co-editor for Springer-Nature Publishers.

    Papers to be presented

    Abstract

    The advent of blockchain technology and its synergistic technological advances such as the Internet of things and artificial intelligence have significant potential upsides for business and society. The literature—but not necessarily the practice—has shown growth in the interest of these technologies for sustainability purposes. Primarily, for blockchain technology, the interest has been growing in sustainable supply chains and circular economy practices. We describe some of the potential and promise of blockchain technology for inter-organizational sustainability and circularity management. We also identify the pitfalls and impediments of this technology. Overcoming these latter issues can mean the difference between unrealized hype and powerful impact on the future of sustainability. Research and practice related to some of my current research projects will be overviewed—especially recent and emerging work related to lessons from the COVID crisis.

  • "The Psychology of Consumer Fun"

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    Columbia University professor Michel Pham

    Michel Tuan Pham is the Kravis Professor of Business in Marketing at Columbia University's Graduate School of Business, which he joined more than 25 years ago. He has a Licentiate degree in Applied Economics from the Catholic University of Louvain-Mons, Belgium, and MA and PhD degrees in Business Administration-Marketing from the University of Florida, Gainesville. His research focuses on consumer psychology and on judgment and decision-making. He is particularly known for his research on the role of affect—moods, feelings, and emotions—in judgment and decision-making, and on consumer self-regulation. He is the author of more than 50 widely cited articles in outlets such as the Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Marketing Research, Journal of Consumer Psychology, International Journal of Research in Marketing, Psychological Science, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Personality and Social Psychology Review, and Review of General Psychology. He is a past President of the Society for Consumer Psychology. In 2015, he received the Society's highest honor, the SCP Fellow award, for his "Outstanding Contributions to the Field of Consumer Psychology." He is a past Area Editor of the Journal of Consumer Psychology's popular Research Dialogue section, and recent issue Editor of the Journal of the Association for Consumer Research. His past doctoral students have accepted faculty positions at the University of Texas-Austin, HKUST, University of Toronto, Singapore Management University, Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, and most recently Yeshiva University. His 2013 Journal of Consumer Psychology article on "The Seven Sins of Consumer Psychology," has become a must-read in many doctoral seminars.

    Paper to be presented

    Abstract

    The experience of fun plays a major role in the consumer society. Drawing on a grounded theory approach, we advance a psychological theory of consumer fun. Through an integration of in-depth interviews, narrative analyses, controlled experiments, structural equation modeling, and a photo-ethnography, our multi method investigation makes four main contributions. First, we show that the experience of fun rests on the combination of two psychological pillars: hedonic engagement and a sense of liberation. Fun is an experience of liberating engagement—a temporary release from psychological restriction via a hedonically engaging activity. Second, we identify four situational facilitators—novelty, social connectedness, spontaneity, and spatial/temporal boundedness—that promote the experience of fun through their effects on hedonic engagement and the sense of liberation. Third, we show that although the psychology of fun is not consumption specific, there is an intimate connection between fun and consumption. Finally, we clarify the relation and distinction between fun and happiness. We discuss implications for our understanding of consumption experiences, business practices related to the engineering of fun, and consumers' own pursuits of fun and happiness.

    Keywords: fun, happiness, consumer experience, multimethod, hedonic consumption, pleasure, emotion, affect, leisure, entertainment

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    Lubin professor Mingming Zhou

    "Innovation and Political Pluralism"

    Paper to be presented:

    Innovation and Political Pluralism (PDF) (Iftekhar Hasan, Haitian Lu, Tuomas Takalo, and Mingming Zhou)

    Abstract of Innovation and Political Pluralism (PDF) (Iftekhar Hasan, Haitian Lu, Tuomas Takalo, and Mingming Zhou)

    For more information, visit Professor Zhou's faculty profile.