Anne Toomey

Anne Toomey

Associate Professor
Dyson College of Arts and Sciences
Environmental Studies and Science
NYC
Y34-2
One Pace Plaza

Biography

Faculty Bio

Anne is an interdisciplinary conservation scientist who is interested in how people connect to their natural environment and the role of scientific research in supporting that connection. Currently she holds the post of Assistant Professor at Pace University’s Department of Environmental Studies and Science, where she teaches courses on sustainability and multiple environmental perspectives. Her most recent research focuses on the links between citizen science, civic environmental stewardship, and sense of place along urban waterfronts. Anne received her Ph.D. in Human Geography from Lancaster University in the UK, her Masters in Sustainable Development and Natural Resources from American University, and her B.A. in Political Science and Communications from the University of Rhode Island.

Awards and Honors

  • 2020, PAVDF Periclean Faculty Leader Award
  • 2019, Bronze Medal, Jefferson Awards for Public Service

Research and Creative Works

Research Interest

Please visit my personal research website at: https://www.environmentalintersections.org/

Courses Taught

Past Courses

ENS 486: Rsrch in Envrnmntl Sci
ENS 798: Tpc: Environmental Science
ENV 100: Water, Wildlife and Windmills
ENV 105: Social Respon and World Nature
ENV 112: Envrnmntl Studies-Basic Issues
ENV 140: Act Locally:Sustain Dsgn & You
ENV 235: Sustainable Living in Our Wrld
ENV 265: Multiple Envrnmntl Knowledges
ENV 297: Nature and the City
ENV 297: Topics: Citizen Science
ENV 390: Internship In Enviro Studies
ENV 395: Independent Study
ENV 396: Internship In Enviro Studies
ENV 498: Mentoring Seminar
ENV 499: Senior Year Exp/Environmental
EP 608: Analytical Mtd for EP Analysis
EP 610: Cntmpry Issues in EP: Capstone
ESP 608: Anlytcl Mthds in Env Sci
ESP 794: Cntmprry Envrnmntl Issues: Cps

Publications and Presentations

Publications

Why facts don't change minds: Insights from cognitive science for the improved communication of conservation research
(2023). Biological Conservation. Vol 278

The Making of Conservation Landscape: Towards a Practice of Interdependence
(2020). Conservation & Society. Vol 18 (Issue 1) , pages pp. 25-36 .
DOWNLOAD

Place-making, place-disruption, and place protection of urban blue spaces: perceptions of waterfront planning of a polluted urban waterbody
(2020, June). Local Environment. Vol 26 (Issue 8)

Academic Leaders Must Support Inclusive Scientific Communities During COVID-19
(2020, June). Nature Ecology & Evolution. Vol 4 , pages 997–998.
DOWNLOAD

The place-making potential of citizen science: Creating social-ecological connections in an urbanized world
(2020, April (2nd Quarter/Spring)). Landscape and Urban Planning. Vol 200 (Issue 103824)

A question of dissemination: Assessing the practices and implications of research in tropical landscapes
(2019). Ambio. Vol 48 (Issue 1) , pages 35--47.

Are Coyotes “Natural”? Differences in Perceptions of Coyotes Among Urban and Suburban Park Users
(2019). Cities and the Environment. Vol 12 (Issue 2) , pages 1--18.

Exploring and expanding the spaces between research and implementation in conservation science
(2019). Biological Conservation. Vol 240

Exploring and expanding the spaces between research and implementation in conservation science
(2019, November). Biological Conservation. Vol 240

Developing effective wellbeing indicators for people and nature: how biocultural approaches can facilitate sustainable management of social-ecological systems
(2018).

Assessing the evidence for stakeholder engagement in biodiversity conservation
(2017). Biological conservation. Vol 209 , pages 159--171.

Biocultural approaches to well-being and sustainability indicators across scales
(2017). Nature ecology \& evolution. Vol 1 (Issue 12) , pages 1798--1806.

Embrace complexity to improve conservation decision making
(2017). Nature ecology \& evolution. Vol 1 (Issue 11) , pages 1588.

Navigating the space between research and implementation in conservation
(2017). Conservation Letters. Vol 10 (Issue 5) , pages 619--625.

Writing History in the Present: The implications of localized forms of science in Latin America for a postcolonial world
(2017, March). Alternautas. https://www.alternautas.net/blog/2017/3/15/part-1-writing-history-in-the-present-the-implications-of-localized-forms-of-science-in-latin-america-for-a-postcolonial-world

Assessing the evidence of stakeholder engagement in biodiversity conservation
(2017, February). Biological Conservation. Vol 209 , pages 159-171.

What happens at the gap between knowledge and practice? Spaces of encounter and misencounter between environmental scientists and local people.
(2016). Ecology and Society. Vol 21 (Issue 2) https://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol21/iss2/art28/

Inter-and transdisciplinary research: A critical perspective
(2015). Zu finden in< https://sustainabledevelopment. un. org/content/documents/612558-Inter. Vol 20

Related News and Stories

In the Media

Toomey, a conservation scientist at Pace University’s Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences, tells me why this happens: It’s human psychology.

“Knowledge is formed by our experiences, not just by reading facts in a textbook,” she says. “Scientists believe ‘if only people knew what I know, they’d think differently from how they think now.’ But that’s not how it works. We don’t just need to give people information. We need to start understanding how that information can be brought into a process of change-making.”

Faculty and Staff

Dyson Environmental Studies and Science Professors Monica Palta and Anne Toomey have been conducting research in Coney Island Creek, documenting the existing environmental and social ecosystem. Their work aims to reshape the conversation surrounding urban waterfront development.