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Pforzheimer Honors College

Courses and Course Schedules


Spring 2019 Honors Courses

ENG 120- Critical Writing, 4 credits, CRN 20794
Instructor TBA
Tuesday and Thursday 10:05-12:05pm
Attributes: Foundation
Course Description: This course will emphasize the development of argument and analysis as students work with a variety of literary and non-fiction texts. Students will learn more advanced research skills, including methods of documentation, the use of library and Internet resources and the synthesis and integration of primary and secondary sources into their own essays

ENG 201- Writing in the Disciplines, 3 credits, CRN 23103
Instructor TBA
Tuesday and Thursday 10:35am-12:00pm
Attribute: Foundation
Prerequisites: ENG 120, completion of 45 credits
Course Description: This course is an upper-level writing requirement. Its focus will be on writing effective essays and research papers in disciplinary modes and in students' field of interest. It may include interviews, analysis of journal articles, and appropriate documentation style formats.

MAT 134- Intro to Probability & Statistics, 3 credits, CRN 23068
Professor Emilio Fernandez
Monday and Wednesday 1:20pm-2:45pm
Attributes: Foundation, AOK5/HSN
Prerequisite: MAT 100, 103, 130, or Placement Score of 30
Not open to students who have completed MAT 117 or MAT 234.
Course Description: Introduction to the study of random processes; finite sample spaces, the role of assumptions in the formulation of probability models, probability models based on equally-likely outcomes, independent events, and conditional probability. Bayes' theorem, random variables, mathematical expectation; statistical applications of probability, introduction to sampling theory, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing.

INT 299J- Environmental Clinic I, 3 credits, CRN 23523
Professors John Cronin & Michelle Land
Tuesday and Thursday 10:35am-12:00pm
Attributes: Civic Engagement
Course Description: The Pace Environmental Clinic experience is unique in higher education. Its goal is to provide students from a variety of majors with professional-level training in the real world of environmental policy and practice. Student teams conduct casework on cutting edge issues that apply and expand upon their fields of study through the practical application of policy, law, business, science, technology and more. Student clinicians attain an understanding of the forces that shape environmental decision-making, and learn to command the diverse skills necessary to be an effective advocate in the professional world. Student clinicians also learn the specialized civic-engagement skills that enable them to become active citizens, such as legal, political and communication skills training, preparation of hearing testimony, news release writing, bill drafting, and lobbying. The Clinic regularly interacts with a wide variety of experts and professionals inside and outside Pace. Students who take the course can expect to find themselves participating in official decision-making processes ranging from local to state to federal levels of government.

CIS 102Y- Topic: Design Thinking and Innovation, 3 credits, CRN 23526
Instructor TBA
Tuesday 2:25-4:25pm
Attributes: Civic Engagement, Writing-Enhanced
Course Description: This project-based learning course (PBL) introduces students to innovation and problem solving through the use of the design thinking framework. The course is designed as a corner stone experience for students in their first or second year at Pace University and is open to all undergraduate majors. The course project(s) consist of problems posed by industry clients. Project clients may include non-profit or for-profit organizations. Project deliverables include a mid and end of semester presentation, an electronic or physical product prototype, and written project reflection reports.

PSY 233- Psychology of Civic Engagement, 3 credits, CRN 20593
Professor Elizabeth Tesoriero
Online Class Attributes: Civic Engagement
Course Description: This course will introduce you to the application of psychology principles to a variety of social service settings. A strong emphasis on civic engagement will be featured.

ENV 297P- Topic: Urban Environmental Geography, 3 credits, CRN 23418
Professor Michael Finewood
Tuesday and Thursday 10:35am-12:00pm
Attribute: AOK3/WCT, AOK5/HSN
This is a Video Conference course, joining classrooms in PLV and NYC.
Course Description: This course explores the structural, historical, and spatial geography of cities. We will apply a political ecology framework, which investigates the politics of environmental conditions. We will consider the historical development of cities, why they are located in particular places, and their social, political, economic, and ecological structures. Importantly, we will emphasize the urban as socio-ecological systems, both unto themselves and as nodes in broader networks that connect cities to global economies and suburban and rural resources. Students will learn to investigate urban structures, who benefits and who does not, and strategies for sustainable futures. We will pay particular attention to urban greenspaces and environmental justice. Students will produce a case study of an urban environmental challenge that emphasizes current research in environmental studies and sciences.

INT 299T- Classical Influences on Contemporary France, 6 credits, CRN 23545
Professor Adelia Williams-Lubitz
Friday 11:00am-2:00pm
Attribute: AOK2/WH, AOK4/HCE, Writing-Enhanced, Learning Community
This is a Video Conference course, joining classrooms in PLV and NYC.
Course Description: In this Learning Community, we will examine French philosophy and literature, beginning with the work of thinkers such as Montaigne and Descartes, who deeply influenced the development of modern science; Moliere whose influence on French culture and on the history of the theatre has been extraordinary, Montesquieu, Voltaire and Rousseau, who were of criterial importance to both the US and French revolutions, and concluding with Beaumarchais, himself a figure in the American revolution, Madame de Stael who coined the term Romanticism, and Honore Balzac. We will pay particular attention to the social, political and ethical effects on contemporary Paris. INT 299T will contain components of PHI 116 and FRE 155C.

MGT 150- Managerial and Organizational Concepts, 3 credits, CRN 22547
Professor Julia Eisenberg
Monday and Wednesday 2:55-4:20pm
Attributes: Business Core, Writing-Enhanced
Prerequisite: 16 credits completed
Course Description: This course examines basic managerial functions of planning, organizing, motivating, leading, and controlling. Emphasis is also given to the behavior of individual and groups within organizations.

FIN 260- Financial Management, 3 credits, CRN 20566
Monday and Wednesday 9:00-10:25am
Professor Padmaja Kadiyala
Attributes: Business Core
Prerequisites: ECO 106, ACC 203 & 204, MAT 104, MAT 117
Course Description: This course introduces students to the financial decisions facing the manager. Topics include: financial analysis of the firm's current and future financial condition; efficient management of the firm's assets; sources of short and long-term financing; introduction to financial theory, including valuation, capital budgeting, leverage, capital structure and the timing of financial decisions.

PSY 240- Positive Psychology & Happiness, 3 credits, CRN 22785
Professor Paul Griffin
Tuesday and Thursday 10:35-12:00pm
Attributes: AOK5/HSN
Course Description: This course will be devoted to a particular domain of research and clinical application, known as “positive psychology.” In short, this class is about what psychology has learned about happiness and optimal human functioning. During the semester a number of different topics will be addressed, including: (1) identifying the goals and subject matter of positive psychology; (2) reviewing and critically examining theoretical perspectives and (most importantly) empirical findings on what predicts human happiness, from the biological to the environmental; (3) moving beyond what makes us happy and studying other aspects of the “good life,” such as signature strengths, purpose in life, gratitude, and acts of kindness; and (4) examining whether these theories and findings can be applied to everyday life.

PSY 256- Psychology of Personal Adjustment, 3 credits, CRN 23421
Professor Courtney Gosnell
Monday and Wednesday 1:20-2:45pm
Attributes: AOK5/HSN
Course Description: An experiential and cognitive study of personal adjustment. Students participate in a series of exercises and group discussions designed to help the student better understand his or her own adjustment to situations, as well as to learn general principles of personal and interpersonal functioning.

CRJ 351- Criminal Evidence and Procedure, 3 credits, CRN 21185
Professor Maryellen Martirano
Tuesday 12:15-3:15pm
Attributes: N/A
Course Description: Comprehensive analysis of rules of evidence, especially as treated under the Criminal Procedure Law of 1970. Subjects include real and circumstantial evidence, burden of proof, hearsay evidence, confessions, admissions, witnesses' identification, etc., as they relate to criminal cases.


International Studies

INT 197G: Rome the Eternal City- Travel Course, 6 credits, CRN 20518
Co-requisite: RES 101 (CRN 21890)
Professor Lawrence Hundersmarck
Attributes: AOK2, Learning Community, Honors Study Abroad
Tentative Travel Dates: May 23 - June 13, 2019
Registration for this course requires you to apply through Education Abroad.
Course Description: This travel course seeks to offer an intense and comprehensive experience grounded in an understanding of the history, art, architecture, religion, and culture of this city; the capital of the ancient Roman Empire, the Catholic Church, and the modern state of Italy. The course is designed to be rigorous academic study and a great deal of fun as students are offered an opportunity to see and experience what they are learning first hand. The course will involve extensive lectures throughout Rome within the context of visits to the most important and awe inspiring Roman historical and cultural sites. Students will have the opportunity to study with faculty experts from the United States and Italy.


Thesis

HON 499- Research Methods, 1 credit, CRN 21427
Professor Susan Dinan
Monday 1:20-2:20pm
Attributes: Honors requirement for thesis (if no department equivalent offered)
Restricted to Juniors & Seniors
Course Description: This course is designed to assist Honors seniors with the formulation of a thesis project by preparing them in the research methods needed to successfully produce a completed project. Students will be expected to produce a thesis proposal as well as a significant portion of the project itself. A grade of Pass/Fail will be given in the course.

HON 499- Research Methods, 1 credit, CRN 21429
Professor Ellen Cahn
Wednesday: 4:35-5:30pm
Attributes: For Lubin students: Honors requirement for thesis
Restricted to Juniors & Seniors
Course Description: This course is designed to assist Honors seniors with the formulation of a thesis project by preparing them in the research methods needed to successfully produce a completed project. Students will be expected to produce a thesis proposal as well as a significant portion of the project itself. A grade of Pass/Fail will be given in the course.


Internship

HON 393- Honors Internship, 0 credits, CRN 22315
Must receive permission from the Dean of the Pforzheimer Honors College
Course Description: Students from all majors are part of the Pforzheimer Honors College, and therefore internships will be pursued in a wide range of fields. In order for a student to earn Honor credit for an internship, s/he must place the experiential learning into the context of the course of study and the Honors course completed if they are relevant to the internship by writing a paper of 8-10 pages submitted to the Dean of the Honors College.


Open Only to First-Year Students

PHI 115- Normative Ethics: Contemporary Problems, 3 credits, 22208
Required for all 2nd semester freshmen
Professor Lawrence Hundersmarck
Wednesday 6:10-9:00pm
Attributes: AOK5/HSN
Course Description: A philosophical examination of such issues as abortion, homosexuality, prostitution, criminal punishment, euthanasia, medical ethics, business ethics, civil disobedience, and just and unjust wars. Discussion of these issues will be framed by an examination of major ethical theories.

PHI 115, Normative Ethics: Contemporary Problems, 3 credits, 22209
Required for all 2nd semester freshmen
Professor Lawrence Hundersmarck
Wednesday 1:20-4:20pm
Attributes: AOK5/HSN
Course Description: A philosophical examination of such issues as abortion, homosexuality, prostitution, criminal punishment, euthanasia, medical ethics, business ethics, civil disobedience, and just and unjust wars. Discussion of these issues will be framed by an examination of major ethical theories.